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MES  NfT  CIRCULATE 


ARCHIVES 


STATE  OF  NEW  JERSEY 


FIRST     SERIES. 
Vol.     XXVI. 


This  volume  was  prepared  and  edited  by  authority 
of  the  State  of  New  Jersey,  at  the  request  of  the  New 
Jersey  Historical  Society,  and  under  the  direction  of 
the  following  Committee  of  the  Society: 

WILLIAM  NELSON, 
GARRET  D.  W.  VROOM, 
AUSTIN  SCOTT, 
FRANCIS  B.   LEE, 
ERNEST  C.  RICHARDSON. 


DOCUMENTS 


RELATING  TO  THE 


COLONIAL  HISTORY 


OF  THE 


STATE  OF  NEW  JERSEY. 


EDITED  BY 


WILLIAM  NELSON 


VOUJIVIE    XXVI.  ,  ,  -,, 

v    ^* 


EXTRACTS  FROM  AMERICAN  NEWSPAPERS,  RELATING  TO 
NEW  JERSEY. 

VOL      VII.     1T68-1T69. 


PATERSON,  N.  J.: 
THE  CALL  PRINTING  AND  PUBLISHING  Co. 


!       :1HM. 


F 


WITHDRAWN  FROM 
COOPER  UNION  LIBRARY 


PREFACE. 


Within  the  five  hundred  and  ninety-three  pages  of  this  volume 
the  attentive  reader  will  find  a  vast  amount  of  information  concern- 
ing conditions — social,  economical,  religious  and  political — in  New 
Jersey  in  the  years  1768  and  1769. 

The  newspapers  of  the  day,  though  still  innocent  of  any  expres- 
sion of  opinion  by  the  printers — editors  and  editorials  being  as  yet 
unknown  even,  in  American  journalism — became  more  than  ever  the 
vehicles  of  public  sentiment,  expressed  in  communications  from  "A 
True  Patriot,"  "Independent  Freeholder,"  "Taxpayer,"  and  their 
confreres  of  the  ready  pen,  eager  to  discuss  at  intolerable  length  the 
great  questions  filling  men's  thoughts.  It  will  be  observed  that  most 
of  these  letters  relate  to  economic  subjects,  indicating  that  they  were 
the  principal  causes  of  discontent  among  the  Colonists.  New  Jersey 
was  growing  fast.  Trade  and  commerce  were  seeking  new  outlets. 
New  stage  routes  were  being  established,  there  being  two  between 
New  York  and  Philadelphia  much  of  the  time,  a  stage  setting  out 
daily  each  way.  A  new  line  between  Newark  and  New  York  con- 
sidered that  the  traffic  between  those  places  would  be  accommodated 
by  four  trips  a  week,  probably  carrying  four  or  five  persons  at  a 
time.  The  people  had  become  so  used  to  these  vehicles  that  it  was 
no  longer  necessary  to  seek  custom  by  advertising  them  as  "flying 
machines,"  as  formerly.  The  increase  of  travel  was  naturally  fol- 
lowed by  a  multiplying  of  taverns,  which  were  evidently  of  a  better 
quality  than  formerly.  The  growth  of  commerce  led  Governor 
Franklin  to  urge  upon  the  Legislature  the  importance  of  better 
roads. 

But  the  growth  of  the  Province  caused  a  demand  for  more 
currency ;  and  the  lack  of  it  was  followed  by  a  rise  in  the  cost  of 
living,  and  to  some  extent  a  falling  off  in  trade.  The  writers  for 
the  newspapers  had  their  several  explanations  and  as  diverse 
remedies  to  offer.  The  pessimist  ascribes  the  "hard  times"  in 
1768-9  to  the  scarcity  of  money  (the  experience  of  most  people  from 
the  earliest  ages  even  to  the  present  day)  ;  to  the  increased  cost  of 
living,  greatly  swollen  from  1755  to  1768;  but  chiefly  to  the  "expen- 
sive diversions  and  sins  of  dissipation  unknown  among  us  until  of 
late" — a  remark  which  has  a  familiar  sound  in  the  year  of  Grace 
1907.  This  writer  estimates  that  the  people  of  New  Jersey  actually 
expended  as  much  as  £40,000,  or  say  $100.000,  annually  in  tea, 


VI  PREFACE. 

obviously  a  waste  of  good  money  for  a  needless  luxury.  The  decay 
of  trade,  he  somewhat  inconsistently  assumes,  was  due  to  the  same 
cause.  Others,  however,  lay  the  grievances  the  people  were  supposed 
to  have  groaned  under  for  some  years  past  to  the  oppression  of  the 
lawyers,  who  were  "rioting  in  luxury,"  having  "acquired  estates 
from  the  toil  and  labor  of  the  necessitous."  The  remedy,  then,  was 
to  reduce  the  fees  of  the  legal  fraternity,  and  to  increase  the  juris- 
diction of  the  justices  of  the  peace  in  actions  of  debt,  from  £6  to 
£10,  or  from  $15  to  $25.  So  easily,  it  was  thought,  could  the  rich 
be  made  poorer,  and  the  poor  richer,  by  a  simple  act  of  the  Legis- 
lature. 

It  is  evident,  however,  that  the  popular  irritation  was  largely 
due  to  the  interference  of  the  British  King  and  Parliament  with  the 
internal  affairs  of  the  Colonies.  The  Stamp  Act,  passed  in  1765, 
though  repealed  in  1766  was  not  forgotten ;  nor  the  distinct  assertion 
by  the  British  ministry  of  the  right  of  Parliament  to  tax  the 
American  people.  The  New  Jersey  Legislature  more  than  once,  in 
obedience  to  the  popular  demand,  had  passed  bills  for  a  large 
emission  of  paper  currency,  well  secured,  only  to  have  the  acts 
disallowed  by  the  King.  Similarly,  bills  to  increase  the  civil  juris- 
diction of  the  justices  of  the  peace  had  met  a  like  fate.  This  feeling 
of  resentment  was  greatly  heightened  by  the  measures  taken  by  the 
ministry  to  punish  the  people  of  Boston,  and  the  merchants  and 
traders  and  citizens  generally  of  New  Jersey  enthusiastically  entered 
into  the  agreement  with  the  other  Colonies  to  import  no  British 
goods  until  the  embargo  should  be  lifted  from  Boston  port, 
denounced  the  merchants  and  traders  of  New  York  for  proposing 
even  a  modification  of  the  boycott  which  was  ruining  their  com- 
merce, and  dealt  mob  law  out  to  any  unfortunate  individuals  so 
much  as  suspected  of  opposing  the  Non-Importation  agreement. 
These  views  were  reflected  in  the  speech  of  Hendrick  Fisher,  on 
being  re-elected  to  the  Assembly  from  Somerset  county,  in  1768. 
Cortlandt  Skinner  presented  them  fairly  and  plainly  to  the  home 
government  in  the  same  year;  and  the  Assembly  boldly  addressed 
the  King — with  profuse  avowals  of  reverence  and  loyalty — remon- 
strating against  the  acts  of  Parliament  interfering  with  the  Colonies, 
and  especially  protesting  against  Parliamentary  taxation.  Again, 
the  Assembly  declared  that  "no  transaction  of  theirs  tended  in  the 
least  to  widen  or  continue  the  unhappy  differences  subsisting 
between  Great  Britain  and  the  Colonies,"  but  at  the  same  time 
(October  18,  1769)  they  voted  their  thanks  to  "the  merchants  and 
traders  of  New  York  and  Pennsylvania,  for  their  disinterested  and 
public  spirited  conduct  in  withholding  their  importations  of  British 
merchandise  until  certain  acts  of  Parliament  laying  restrictions  on 


PREFACE.  Vll 

American  commerce  for  the  express  purpose  of  raising  revenue  in 
America  be  repealed."  Yet  there  has  been  a  tendency  in  recent  years 
to  question  the  importance  of  the  issue  of  "No  taxation  without 
representation,"  as  one  of  the  causes  of  the  American  Revolution. 

Another  burning  question  of  the  day  was  the  proposition  of  the 
Bishop  of  Landaff  to  have  Bishops  appointed  in  England  to  super- 
intend the  affairs  of  the  Church  in  America — a  project  regarded 
with  intense  disfavor  by  the  Colonists,  at  least  by  those  not  con- 
nected with  the  Church  of  England,  who  regarded  it  as  another 
scheme  to  place  the  American  people  under  English  control,  in  a 
matter  very  near  to  their  consciences.  The  character  of  the  argu- 
ments on  this  question  is  indicated  in  the  letters  abstracted  on  pages 
77-86,  94-120,  125-6,  infra. 

Business  troubles  were  doubtless  accelerated  by  the  unsettled 
political  condition  of  the  times.  It  is  melancholy  to  see  so  many 
advertisements  of  insolvent  debtors  in  "goal."  Perhaps  these  cir- 
cumstances account  for  the  large  number  of  farms  offered  for  sale, 
most  of  them  well-cultivated,  with  many  improvements,  choice 
orchards,  etc.  Perhaps  for  the  same  reasons  many  iron  mines  and 
iron  works  were  seeking  buyers,  the  minute  descriptions  of  such 
plants,  as  set  forth  in  the  advertisements,  being  of  great  interest  and 
value.  On  the  other  hand,  the  non-importation  agreements  en- 
couraged domestic  manufactures,  glowing  accounts  of  which  were 
exultantly  published  in  the  newspapers  of  the  period.  The  attrac- 
tions of  Sussex  county,  as  captivatingly  advertised  herein,  indicate 
that  population  was  drifting  into  that  comparatively  new  region  for 
settlement. 

Still  another  cause  of  controversy  between  the  people  and  the 
royal  authorities  was  the  robbery  of  the  treasury  of  the  Eastern 
Division  of  New  Jersey,  at  Perth  Amboy,  July  21,  1768.  This  unfor- 
tunate circumstance  was  promptly  and  with  avidity  seized  upon  by 
the  Assembly  to  bait  the  Governor,  who,  however,  met  the  attack 
squarely  and  with  much  skill ;  but  the  quarrel  smouldered  for  years, 
and  was  used  as  another  argument  in  favor  of  having  the  Provincial 
officers  appointed  by,  or  at  least  responsible  directly  to,  the  Assem- 
bly, as  the  people's  representatives. 

A  pleasant  episode  was  the  attendance  of  Governor  William 
Franklin  and  Chief  Justice  Frederick  Smyth,  of  New  Jersey,  at  the 
Congress  of  the  Six  Nations  and  their  tributaries  at  Fort  Stanwix, 
New  York,  where  our  diplomatic  young  Governor  conducted  himself 
so  ably  that  he  received  from  the  admiring  savages  the  compli- 
mentary title  of  Sagorighwiyoghsta,  or  "Great  Arbiter  or  Doer  of 
Justice,"  which  style  he  cleverly  devolved  upon  the  Province  of  New 
Jersey. 


viii  PREFACE. 

Another  important  event  chronicled  herein  was  the  appointment 
by  the  King,  of  Commissioners,  in  1769,  who  settled  the  northern 
boundary  of  New  Jersey,  between  this  Province  and  New  York. 

Princeton  College  seems  to  have  maintained  a  well-managed 
bureau  of  publicity,  by  which  the  affairs  of  the  College  were  con- 
stantly kept  before  the  community.  A  preparatory  school  was 
established  at  Princeton,  which  was  soon  followed  by  stricter 
requirements  for  matriculation  in  the  College,  students  entering 
being  obliged  to  have  a  knowledge  of  vulgar  arithmetic.  The  ex- 
penses of  students  were  preposterously  low.  (See  pp.  p6g,  304,  427.) 
The  very  prosperity  of  the  College  drew  upon  it  the  animadversions 
of  the  envious.  (P.  195.) 

Here  we  note  the  beginnings  of  Queens,  now  the  flourishing 
Rutgers,  College,  at  New  Brunswick.  Schools  of  a  higher  grade 
than  formerly,  teaching  the  learned  languages,  are  advertised,  at 
New  Bridge,  Hackensack,  Elizabethtown  and  New  Brunswick,  indi- 
cating a  development  in  intellectual  culture.  More  books  are 
announced,  by  New  Jersey  authors. 

The  New  Jersey  Medical  Society,  established  in  1766,  is  flourish- 
ing in  1768  and  1769,  and  holding  regular  meetings. 

Other  incidents  herein  chronicled  may  be  briefly  noted :  A  man 
torn  to  pieces  by  a  panther,  at  Shrewsbury.  Mob  law  checked  in 
Morris  county  by  the  judicious  use  of  a  gun,  in  determined  hands. 
A  disastrous  fire  at  New  Brunswick,  destroying  several  buildings, 
and  records  of  great  importance.  The  board  of  justices  and  free- 
holders of  Middlesex  County  indicted  for  illegal  expenditures,  but 
acquitted — a  history  repeated  one  hundred  and  thirty-eight  years 
later.  More  runaway  servants  advertised  than  formerly,  but  better 
clad,  and  evidently  in  better  circumstances. 

Such  are  some  of  the  topics  touched  on  in  these  Extracts  from 
American  Newspapers,  relating  to  New  Jersey.  They  are  all 
referred  to,  and  many  besides,  in  the  copious  index  at  the  end  of 
the  volume. 

FEBRUARY  10,  1907. 


Newspaper  Extracts. 


EXTRACT  of  a  LETTER  from  PRINCETON, 
dated  January  5,  1768. 

"I  take  this  Opportunity  to  acquaint  you  of  several  un- 
fortunate Events  that  have  lately  happened  in  this  Neigh- 
bourhood, which  may  be  of  Service  (by  Way  of  Caution) 
to  publish  in  the  Pennsylvania  Chronicle.  They  are  as 
follow: — 

"On  Thursday  the  $ist  of  December  ult.  Obadiah  Wil- 
kins, a  Constable,  having  executed  a  Warrant  on  one 
Crow,  for  Debt,  attended  him  to  a  neighbouring  House 
in  order  to  obtain  Security  -  -  -  but  the  Prisoner  being 
disappointed,  watched  an  Opportunity,  and  made  his  Es- 
cape to  his  Waggon,  then  in  the  Road,  and  drove  away, 
which  Wilkins  discovering,  called  to  him,  and  charged 
him  to  stop,  being  his  Prisoner  -  -  -  This  being  disre- 
garded, he  pursued  and  overtook  the  Waggon,  and  en- 
deavoured to  stop  the  Horse;  but  Crow  still  determined 
to  proceed,  told  him  if  he  did  not  desist  he  should  drive 
over  him  -  which  happened  immediately  after,  poor 

Wilkins  being  entangled  in  the  Gcers  of  the  Horses.  It 
is  said  the  Wheels  dragged  him  thirty  Yards,  then  run 
over  and  killed  him,  notwithstanding  a  Person  present 
called  out  that  Wilkins  was  under  the  Wheels,  and  did  all 

in  his  Power  to  stop  the  Horses. /  am  informed  the 

Jury  of  Inquest  have,  brought  in  their  Verdict,  "An  Acci- 
dent, owing  to  Crow's  driving  the  Horses." 


2  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

"The  same  Day  as  a  Man  in  Hopewell  was  driving  a 
Team,  in  jumping  off  his  Waggon,  he  slipt,  and  the 
Wheeles  went  over  and  killed  him." 

"And  on  Monday  Night  last,  the  Barn  of  Mr.  Steel, 
near  Somerset  Court-House,  was  burnt  down,  with  a  con- 
siderable Quantity  of  Provender,  &c.  but  providentially 
all  the  neighbouring  Houses  were  preserved,  tho'  the 
Barn,  I  believe,  was  not  twenty  Feet  from  the  Court- 
House,  and  said  Steel's  Dzvelling-House  There 
were  also  several  other  Houses  contiguous.  In  the  Hurry 
and  Confusion  on  the  Occasion,  a  Negro  Child,  about  si.r 
Months  old,  was  smothered  on  a  Bed,  being  covered  over 
inadvertently  with  Bedding  and  other  Goods. 

Philadelphia,  January  4,  1768. 

THE  Creditors  of  Thomas  Lawrie,  late  of  Allen  Town, 
are  once  more  requested  to  bring  or  send  in  their  De- 
mands against  his  Estate,  on  or  before  the  27th 'Instant, 
to  JAMES  and  DRINKER.  Merchants,  in  Philadelphia, 
SAMUEL  ALLINSON,  Attorney  at  Law,  in  Burlington,  or 
MARIEN  LAMAR,  at  Allen  Town  that  they  may  be  ad- 
justed by  the  Trustees,  who  expect  to  be  prepared  for 
paying  said  Creditors,  their  first  Dividend  of  his  Estate, 
by  the  loth  of  February,  in  Burlington,  where  they,  or 
their  Representatives,  may  apply  for  the  same.1 

Those  who  neglect  to  deliver  in  their  Demands,  by  the 
Time  abovementioned,  must  necessarily  be  excluded  a 
•Share  in  the  first  Dividend. 

Extract  from  a  Letter  of  ATTICUS'. 

To  the  Printer  of  the  PENNSYLVANIA  CHRONICLE  : 
The  letter  sent  to  me  some  months  ago,  without  a  name 

or  signature,  dated  from  Mansfield,  in  Burlington  county. 

N.  J.  Archives.  XXV.,  650. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3 

New-Jersey,  contained  an  instance  of  greatness  of  soul, 
which  deserves  publication;  and  the  reason  of  its  being 
hitherto  delayed  was,  that  I  might  be  fully  assured  of  the 
truth  of  the  fact,  and  having  lately  seen  several  persons 
of  credit  from  that  way,  who  tell  me,  it  is  to  be  depended 
upon,  I  now  give  it  in  my  correspondent's  words,  "An 
"early  settler  in  this  neighbourhood,  acquired  a  large 
"estate — he  had  five  farms  or  plantations,  and  as  many 
"sons;  and  for  each  son,  he  intended  one  of  the  places, 
"and  his  mind  in  that  respect  was  well  known  in  his  fam- 
"ily;  he  however  neglected  to  get  his  will  reduced  into 
"writing,  and  died  without  one,  so  that  as  the  English 
"laws,  in  regard  to  descents,  take  place  in  this  province, 
"the  whole  landed  estate,  became  the  property  of  the  eld- 
"est  son.  This  he  knew,  but  tho'  he  had  then  a  family  of 
"children  of  his  own,  he,  without  hesitation  or  delay,  or- 
"clered  deeds  to  be  drawn,  and  cheerfully  executed  them; 
"to  convey  to  each  brother  the  plantation  designed  for 
"him  by  their  common  father :  "The  name  of  this  just 
"man  was  William  Black,  and  as  he  has  been  deceased 
"several  years,  its  hoped  that  the  mentioning  of  it,  can 
"give  no  offence  to  any  body,  nay,  rather  may  it  not  be 
"called  a  tribute  due  to  such  virtue,  and  the  more  neces- 
"sary  as  his  privite  way  of  living  prevented  him  from 
"being  much  known,  and  his  religious  profession  from 
"directing  any  marble  monument  to  be  erected  to  his  mem- 
"ory!" 

The  opportunities  of  shewing  such  disinterested  acts 
of  justice,  such  proofs  of  real  goodness,  beyond  the  obli- 
gation of  human  laws,  happens  to  few,  and  when  those 
to  whom  the  trial  is  permitted,  acquit  themselves  with 
honour,  the  recital  of  their  conduct  affords  great  and 
heartfelt  joy  to  the  best  of  mankind,  and  even  such  as  are 


4  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

too  selfish  and  degenerate  to  have  behaved  thus  in  the 
like  circumstances,  cannot  but  outwardly  applaud  those 
who  have  done  so. — 

Philadelphia,  1768.     No.  22. 

ATTICUS. 

— The   Pennsylvania    Chronicle,    No.    52,    January 
4-11,  1768. 

NEW- YORK,  December  28. 

It  is  said,  that  the  Merchants  of  this  Town,  trading  to 
the  West-Indies,  are  about  applying  to  the  Corporation, 
to  pass  a  BYE-LAW,  that  no  White-Oak  Hogshead  Staves 
shall  be  deemed  merchantable  by  the  Cullers,  but  such  as 
are  Three-quarters  of  an  Inch  thick  on  the  Heart  Edge, 
and  broad,  clear  of  Sap,  which  we  hope  will  restore  the 
Credit  of  our  Lumber,  and  enable  us  to  share  that  Branch 
of  Trade  with  Pennsylvania,  and  other  Provinces,  that 
have,  for  some  Years  past,  rivalled  us  in  it  at  the  West 
India  Markets.  The  North-River  Lumber  is  remarkably 
good,  which,  from  the  great  Plenty  of  fine  Lumber  on 
each  Side  that  River,  it  is  hoped  will  so  continue :  Indeed 
the  Thing  most  likely  to  hurt  its  Credit  is,  the  permitting 
the  Stave-Getters  from  New-Jersey,  and  other  Parts  (who 
have  been  used  to  get  very  ordinary  Lumber)  to  work 
our  good  Timber. 

PHILADELPHIA,  January  7.  Captain  Eastwick,  from 
St.  Eustatia  is  got  into  Cohansey- Creek. 

ON  Friday  Night,  the  first  of  this  inst.  January,  was 
broke  open,  the  House  of  John  Belong,  at  the  new  Fur- 
nace at  Badston,1  near  Little  Egg-Harbour,  and  sundry 
Goods  taken,  viz.  a  new  Suit  of  brown  Saggathy,  with 
gilt  Buttons,  two  Blankets,  two  Sheets,  a  Sett  of  China, 

i  Batsto. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  5 

and  several  Handkerchiefs.  The  said  Robbery  was  com- 
mitted by  one  William  M'Coy,  a  short  set  Man,  stoop 
shouldered,  a  little  Pock-marked,  and  has  sandy  curled 
Hair;  he  was  seen  with  the  above  Clothes  on,  in  Com- 
pany with  a  short  well  set  Woman,  of  a  dark  Complexion, 
and  black  Hair,  who  wore  a  Damask  or  striped  Silk  Gown, 
white  Stockings,  and  Leather  heeled  Shoes ;  they  crossed 
Cooper's  Ferry  on  Tuesday  last.  Whoever  apprehends 
said  Thief,  so  as  he  may  be  brought  to  Justice,  shall  have 
Five  Pounds  Reward,  and  reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

JOHN  BELONG. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2037,  January  7, 
1768. 

NEW-YORK. 

Jan.  4.  Friday  night  came  up  from  Sandy-Hook,  Capt. 
Young  in  a  ship,  in  12  weeks  from  Bristol;  On  the  3Oth 
of  December,  he  spoke  with  capt.  Inglis  in  a  brig  bound 
from  New- York,  for  Dominica,  about  135  leagues  from 
Sandy-Hook;  and  on  the  22d  of  December  spoke  a  brig 
from  Philadelphia,  but  it  blowing  very  hard  they  could 
not  learn  the  master's  name :  She  had  chairs  lash'd  on 
her  quarters,  and  supposed  themselves  to  be  about  ninety 
leagues  from  the  Capes. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No. 
1309,  January  7,  1768. 

Mr.  GODDARD, 

We  hear  grievous  complaints  of  the  languishing  con- 
dition of  these  provinces,  arising  from  the  scarcity  of  cash, 
and  loud  cries  for  Money!  Money! — Money,  it  seems,  is 
to  do  everything  for  us,  to  clothe  the  sluggard,  provide 
bread  for  the  indolent,  support  the  extravagant,  and  sup- 
ply  the  luxurious — In  short,  it  is  to  help  those  who  will 
not  help  themselves.  In  order  to  put  my  countrymen 


6  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  |  1 768 

upon  an  inquiry  whether  this  is  likely  to  be  the  case,  I 

beg  you  would  give  the  following  hints  a  place  in  the 

next  CHRONICLE,  which  will  oblige  your  constant  Reader, 

Hunterdon,  West-Jersey,  A  PLOUGHMAN. 

Jan.  7,  1768. 

The  Seven  United  Provinces  were  formerly  a  part  of 
the  Spanish  empire,  till  the  inhabitants,  rendered  desper- 
ate by  oppression,  and  impelled  by  a  thirst  of  freedom, 
after  a  long  and  obstinate  struggle,  purchased  to  them- 
selves a  state  of  independance,  and  carefully  established 
that  freedom  which  had  cost  them  so  dear.  This  people, 
possessed  of  a  small  barren  territory,  incapable  of  sup- 
porting one  tenth  of  its  inhabitants  one  tenth  of  the  year, 
destitute  of  every  article  of  trade  and  themselves  reduced, 
by  the  war,  to  extreme  poverty,  rose  to  a  state  of  opu- 
lence and  power,  with  an  amazing  rapidity;  it  may  then 
be  useful  for  us  to  inquire  into  the  cause  which  produced 
such  surprizing  effects.  Was  it  freedom  only?  Not  so, 
that  gives  the  government  of  the  will,  but  reaches  no 
farther,  happiness,  and  things  desirable,  are  obtained  by 
the  prudent  use  of  freedom; — it  was  their  industry,  ac- 
companied with  frugality,  that  raised  them  to  the  height 
they  now  stand;  it  was  this  produced  those  effects  then, 
and  will  do  the  same  now,  it  is  the  true  magnet  that  at- 
tracts riches. 

Let  us  apply  the  foregoing  to  ourselves,  and  impartially 
examine,  whether  the  complaints  we  meet  in  every  street, 
and  from  every  quarter,  for  want  of  money,  be  real  or 
only  imaginary,  i.  e.  whether,  attended  with  that  indus- 
try and  ceconomy  which  ought  to  obtain  under  our  cir- 
cumstances, there  is  not  a  sufficiency  of  cash  to  give 
strength  and  vigor  to  trade  and  improvement?  The  lat- 
ter, 1  am  persuaded,  is  the  case,  and  that  the  extreme 
plenty  of  money,  in  the  latter  part  of  the  late  war,  hath 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  7 

proved  the  greatest  mischief  that  ever  happened  to  these 
provinces;  it  relaxed  industry,  promoted  idleness,  en- 
couraged running  in  debt,  opened  a  door  to  profusion  and 
high  living,  luxury,  and  excess  of  every  kind,  that  the 
most  superficial  observer  must  be  surprised  at  the  differ- 
ence in  living  and  dress  between  1755  and  the  present 
time,  besides  the  expensive  diversions,  and  scenes  of  dis- 
sipation, unknown  among  us  till  of  late;  and  now,  the 
ebb  tide  not  floating  us  where  we  used  to  swim,  it  occa- 
sions loud  complaints,  charging  all  our  distresses  to  the 
scarcity  of  cash.  Whether  that  is  really  the  case,  may 
appear  from  the  following  computation. 

In  the  year  1754,  New-Jersey  had  not  £.  20,000  in  bills 
of  credit;  she  hath  now  near  £.  220,000,  and  I  suppose 
the  state  of  Pennsylvania  may  be  near  similar ;  and  there 
is  certainly  a  much  greater  plenty  of  gold  and  silver  now 
than  at  that  period.  I  therefore  conclude  I  am  within 
bounds  in  judging  there  is  four  to  one  more  money  now 
circulating  in  these  two  provinces,  than  there  was  in  1754. 
Judge  then  from  whence  the  source  of  these  complaints. 

To  make  money,  with  many  other  appendages  of  free- 
dom, we  find  is  dispensed  to  us  at  the  will  and  pleasure 
of  others;  but  frugality  and  ceconomy  is  wholly  in  our 
own  power,  and  is  the  only  means  that  will  yield  us  sure 
and  lasting  relief,  and  is  a  resource  that  cannot  fail,  for 
it  is  evident  our  expences  will  greatly  admit  of  being  re- 
trenched, so  as  for  the  savings  soon  to  pay  all  our  domes- 
tic debts.  To  demonstrate  which,  the  following  partic- 
ular may  serve  for  a  sample. 

From  a  critical  and  ingenious  calculation  there  appears 
to  be  expended  in  New- Jersey  upwards  of  40,000  1.  an- 
nually in  tea,  and  allowing  four  times  that  quantity  for 
Pennsylvania,  together  makes  200,000  1.  per  annum,  to 
these  two  provinces,  for  this  single  article  (which  I  need 


8  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

not  inform  my  readers  we  could  do  without)  ;  what  an 
amazing  sum  then  must  all  our  superfluous  and  unneces- 
sary imports  cost  us,  and  with  what  propriety  do  we  com- 
plain of  the  scarcity  of  money,  when  we  thus  wantonly 
lavish  away  such  immense  sums  for  meer  articles  of  lux- 
ury! Having  mentioned  tea,  I  may  add  that  the  bare 
purchase,  though  no  inconsiderable  sum,  sinks  to  a  trifle, 
scarce  worth  a  thought,  when  compared  with  the  cost  of 
its  equipage,  and  consequences  attending  the  use.  .  .  . 
—The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  53,  January  11-18, 
1768. 

A  MISTAKE. 

ON  Friday  the  6th  Instant,  two  Pieces  of  Dowlas,  and 
one  Piece  of  brown  Shallon,  tied  together,  and  directed 
to  William  Graham,  Taylor,  at  Elisabeth-Town,  were  put 
on  board  of  a  Boat  at  White-Hall  Wharf,  which  was  then 
supposed  to  be  the  Boat  commanded  by  Capt.  Dobbs,  be- 
longing to  Elizabeth-Town:  But  as  said  Graham,  has  not 
received  the  said  Goods,  and  as  Capt.  Dobbs  denies  that 
they  were  put  on  board  his  Boat,  and  carried  elsewhere 
by  Mistake:  The  Person  therefore  who  has  them,  will 
please  to  deliver  them  to  the  Printer  hereof,  or  to  said 
Graham,  at  Elisabeth-Town,  and  he  will  be  thankfully 
rewarded  for  the  same. 

New- York,  January  8,  1768. 

MAJOR  PULLENE,  and  Mr.  Kelly,  have  been  kind 
enough  to  collect  a  Sum  of  Money  for  the  Relief  of  Moses 
Sears,  a  Poor  Man,  that  lives  in  the  Highlands,  who  lost 
his  Sloop  in  the  late  Storm,  by  which  Accident,  himself, 
and  Family,  were  real  Objects  of  Charity.  The  Money 
is  lodged  in  the  Hands  of  the  Mayor,  for  the  Use  of  the 
said  Moses  Sears.  And  we  are  desired  by  the  MAJOR,  to 
give  this  Notice  of  it,  that  the  poor  Man  may  have  the 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  9 

Money,  whenever  be  will  call   for  it. — The  New  York 
Mercury,  No.  845,  January  n,  1768. 

Hackensack,  at  the  New-Bridge, 

WE  the  subscribers,  being  encouraged  by  the  favour- 
able notice,  and  approbation  of  many  gentlemen  of  char- 
acter, both  in  city  and  country,  to  pursue  our  present  busi- 
ness, do  hereby,  from  an  expectation  of  further  encour- 
agement, inform  the  public,  that  it  is  our  honest  design  in 
conjunction  with  each  other,  in  order  to  extend  our  use- 
fulness to  mankind  in  general,  to  continue  to  teach  the 
learned  languages.  A  necessary  and  beautiful  accomplish- 
ment for  young  gentlemen  who  desire  to  make  any  con- 
siderable figure  in  life,  as  they  are  the  proper  foundation 
of  all  other  advances  in  speculative  knowledge,  in  the  ap- 
proved method;  with  the  same  accuracy  and  care  as  for- 
merly, and  hope  our  good  intentions,  together  with  our 
diligence,  and  assiduous  labour,  will  always  be  such,  as 
to  merit  the  assistance  and  approbation  of  all  gentlemen 
of  letters. 

Strangers  may  have  satisfaction,  as  to  the  character  of 
the  school,  by  applying  to  a  number  of  competent  judges, 
in  New-York,  whose  sons  are  now  under  tuition;  and  as 
another  inducement  the  situation  of  the  place  is  almost 
sufficient  of  itself  to  recommend  it. 

It  is  healthy,  pleasant,  and  inviting;  it  abounds  with 
innocent  and  necessary  pleasure  and  amusement :  But, 
at  the  same  time,  youth  are  very  little  exposed  to  vice,  or 
dangerous  examples  to  corrupt  their  morals. 

The  neighbourhood  is  exceedingly  well  calculated  for 
boarding  children,  and  is  heartily  dispused  to  encourage 
so  public  a  utility.  Board  may  be  procured  in  the  best 
families,  at  the  usual  price :  All  possible  care  is,  and  will 
be  taken,  for  good  accommodations.  There  is  sufficient 


10  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

room  for  boarding  twice  the  number  of  scholars  that  are 
at  present  in  the  school,  without  exposing  them  to  any 
inconvenient  distance. 

There  is  also  a  third  person  to  teach  English,  writing 
and  arithmetic,  who  instructs  the  latin  scholars  in  those 
branches  of  education,  such  a  portion  of  time  every  day, 
as  not  to  interfere  with  their  stated  studies,  for  a  small 
additional  consideration  per  quarter. 

We  are  the  publick's  much  obliged,  and 

Most  obedient  humble  servants, 

STEPHANUS  VOORHEES, 
FRANCIS  BARBER.1 

N.  B.  We  will  esteem  it  greatly  to  our  honour,  when- 
ever any  gentleman  shall  think  fit  to  come  and  inspect  our 
school,  and  be  informed  as  to  our  manner  of  instruction, 
and  shall  be  glacl  to  receive  instruction  ourselves,  as  to 
the  method,  or  any  thing  else  that  tend  to  promote  the 
public  good. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Farm  of  223  acres,  lying  about 
two  miles  to  the  northward  of  Prince- 
ton, of  which  there  are  10  acres  of 
meadow  and  70  of  wood  land.  At  a 
little  distance  from  the  house  runs  a 
constant  stream,  which  dividing  into 
several  little  brooks,  waters  the  whole.  Also, 

A  good  convenient  house  in  Princeton,  fronting  the 
college.  Those  who  incline  to  purchase  either  the  farm 
or  house,  may  know  the  terms  of  sale,  by  applying  to  Mr. 
Joseph  Gulden,  at  Princeton,  the  Rev.  Mr.  Munro,  at 
Philipseburgh,2  or  John  Jay,  in  New  York. 

'  The  fact  that  Francis  Barber  taught  school  at  Hackensack  has  gen- 
erally escaped  the  attention  of  his  biographers.  He  taught  for  several 
years  in  the  academy  at  Elizabethtown.  until  the  Revolution,  when  he 
entered  the  army,  attaining  the  rank  of  Major. 

aNow  in  Warren  county. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  I* 

Six  Pounds  Ten  Shillings  Reward. 

STOLEN  out  of  the  house  of  John  Bordan,  at  Wehawk 
Ferry,  on  Sunday  the  I2th  of  January,  1768,  a  silver 
watch  and  pocket-book,  with  about  Nine  Pounds  in  cash, 
and  several  papers  of  value,  of  no  use  to  any  one  but  the 
owner.  The  Thief  had  on  when  he  went  away,  a  \vhite 
coloured  broad-cloth  coat,  with  lapels,  a  black  everlasting 
jacket,  check  shirt  and  trowsers;  half  worn  beaver  hat, 
blue  stockings  and  old  shoes  :  He  is  of  a  fair  complexion, 
light  brown  hair,  commonly  clubb'd  up  behind,  he  is  about 
5  feet  8  inches  high,  and  has  a  slow  low  voice.  Said  thief 
is  suspected  to  be  one  that  went  by  the  name  of  James 
Thomas,  and  was  turn'd  out  of  Hackinsack  jail  the  day 
before  the  above  goods  were  stolen.  Whoever  takes  ur> 
said  thief,  and  secures  him,  so  that  he  may  be  brought 
to  justice,  shall  have  Six  Pounds  Ten  Shillings  reward 
from  us. 

JOHN  BORDAN,  and 
JAMES  CURREN. 

N.  B.  He  very  likely  may  change  both  his  name  and 
apparel. — The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,. 
No.  1306,  January  14,  1768. 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward 

Newcastle  County,  December  30,  1767. 
ABSCONDED  yesterday,  a  certain  man,  who  called  him- 
self HUGH  WILSON,  was  born  in  Ireland,  and  appears  to- 
be  about  30  years  of  age;  he  is  a  tanner  by  trade,  is  about 
5  feet,  3  or  4  inches  high,  well  set,  has  black  hair,  marked 
with  the  small-pox,  a  pleasant  countenance,  lived  some 
time  ago  in  the  Jerseys,  near  Haddonfield :  Had  on  when 
he  went  away,  a  new  blue  surtout  coat,  blue  broadcloth 
close-bodied  coat,  snuff-coloured  waistcoat,  leather 
breeches:  ard  had  some  other  half-- worn  clothes  with 


12  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [  1 768 

him.  He  took  with  him  a  brown  Gelding,  4  years  old. 
.about  14  and  a  half  hands  high,  paces  some,  but  most 
natural  to  trot;  and  a  new  saddle,  with  a  hogskin  seat, 
and  plad  cloth  housings.  It  is  thought  he  took  with  him 
a  quantity  of  money,  chiefly  gold.  Whoever  takes  up  the 
said  Hugh  Wilson,  and  secures  him,  so  that  he  may  be 
liad,  shall  receive  the  above  reward,  paid  by 

HARMON  YEATS 


FREDERICK  SHLEMB,  born  at  Longen  Condto,1  in  Ger- 
many, and  who  came  into  this  country  last  fall,  wants  to 
know  where  his  brother  PETER  SHLEMB  is;  he  has  been 
in  the  country  13  years;  if  alive,  he  may  hear  of  his  broth- 
er, by  enquiring  of  DETERICK  TAUB,  shoemaker,  in  Sec- 
ond-street, Philadelphia. 

N.  B.  Said  Peter  Shlemb  lives  somewhere  in  New- 
Jersey. 

To  be  SOLD,  a  FARM  belonging  to  the  subscriber,  situ- 
ated at  Long  Branch,  in  the  town  of  Shrewsbury,  con- 
taining no  acres.  There  is  on  the  place  a  good  new 
dwelling-house,  with  two  rooms,  and  a  large  entry,  below, 
and  four  rooms  above,  with  very  convenient  out-houses. 
It  is  well  wooded  and  watered,  and  in  very  good  fence, 
lias  good  fresh  and  salt  meadow,  sufficient  for  any  stock 
a  judicious  farmer  would  keep  on  it.  Its  situation  is 
healthy,  and  commands  a  fine  prospect  of  the  Western 
Ocean,  and  as  fine  a  country  view  as  any  the  county  of 
Monmouth  affords;  it  is  within  a  mile  and  a  half  of  a 
fine  river,  that  abounds  with  fish  and  wild  fowl,  and  where 
there  is  a  public  landing.  The  sea  bass  banks  lie  before 
the  door,  which  afford  fish  of  the  best  kind,  winter  and 
summer.  The  advantages  of  such  a  situation  must  rec- 

i  Doubtless  Langenkandel,  in  Rhenish  Bavaria. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 

ommend  it  to  those  who  want  a  farm  for  profit,  and  the 
pleasantness  of  it,  to  those  who  want  a  cool  air,  and  fine 
prospect.  It  is  very  conveniently  situated  for  any  person 
that  would  take  lodgers,  or  keep  a  tavern;  or  any  gentle- 
man that  has  an  inclination  for  a  summer  seat  on  the  sea- 
side, where  he  will  be  troubled  with  no  mosquitoes  or 
other  vermin,  that  render  most  places,  near  the  salts,  dis- 
agreeable. Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  know 
the  terms,  by  applying  to  the  subscriber,  living  on  the 
premises,  or  to  the  printers  hereof. 

JOHN  MORRIS. 

ALL  persons  having  any  demands  against  LUKE  GIB- 
SON, late  of  Deptford  Township,  Gloucester  county,  New- 
Jersey,  deceased,  are  requested  to  bring  them  in  forthwith, 
in  order  the  better  to  enable  those  concerned  to  know  what 
quantity  of  land  to  dispose  of  for  the  payment  thereof; 
and  those  indebted,  to  make  speedy  payment,  in  order  to- 
prevent  trouble  from 

JAMES  COOPER  and  JOSHUA  LORD. 

WHEREAS  in  pursuance  of  an  Act  of  General  Assembly 
of  this  Province,  intituled,  "An  Act  for  granting  the  sum 
of  Sixty  Thousand  Pounds  for  the  King's  use,  and  for 
striking  Fifty-five  Thousand  Pounds  thereof  in  bills  of 
credit,  and  to  provide  a  Fund  for  sinking  the  same,  the 
following  tract  of  located  and  unimproved  lands  was  duly 
valued  and  rated  by  the  assessors  for  the  County  of  North- 
ampton, at  Five  Pounds  by  the  Hundred,  the  property  of 
Richard  Goodwin,  in  the  Jerseys;  to  wit,  a  tract  of  land, 
containing  about  1 50  acres,  situate  in  Mount  Bethel  town- 
ship, in  the  County  of  Northampton,  bounded  by  land  of 
Amos  Strettell  and  the  Blue  Mountains.  And  whereas 
the  owner  of  the  said  tract  of  land  hath  neglected  to  pay 


14  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [  1 768 

the  collector  of  the  said  township  the  sum  of  Eleven  Shil- 
lings and  Threepence,  which,  according  to  the  said  valu- 
ation, was  assessed  and  laid  upon  said  land,  as  the  propor- 
tion thereof  for  one  year  for  said  tax  by  the  act  imposed ; 
We,  the  Commissioners  of  the  County  of  Northampton 
aforesaid,  in  pursuance  of  the  said  act,  do  hereby  give 
notice,  that  on  the  twelfth  day  of  February  next  at  the 
house  of  John  Long,  in  Mount  Bethel  Township,  we  will 
expose  to  sale,  by  public  vendue,  the  above  mentioned  tract 
of  located  unimproved  land,  or  such  part  thereof  as  will 
be  sufficient  to  answer  the  said  tax,  and  all  charges  accru- 
ing, by  reason  of  the  non-payment  thereof,  to  the  highest 
bidder.  The  sale  to  begin  at  10  o'clock  in  the  forenoon. 
Given  under  our  hands,  this  Twenty-seventh  day  of  Octo- 
ber, 1767. 

HARMAN  SHNYDER,  CASPAR  DOLL,  JOHN  WETZEL. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2038,  January  14, 
1768. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  JONATHAN  HAMPTON,  of  Elizabeth  Town, 

in  New-Jersey,  the  following  Tracts  of  Land,  in  said 

Province,  viz. 

FIVE  hundred  acres  of  land  and  marsh,  in  Salem  county, 
bounded  by  Delaware  river,  Stow  creek,  and  Muddy  run. 
Inquire  of  Ebenezer  Miller,  Esq;  near  the  same. 

One  thousand  acres,  at  Great-Egg-harbour,  fine  up- 
lands, cedar  swamps,  and  salt  meadow.  Inquire  of  Mr. 
Few,  who  lives  on  the  same,  or  Mr.  Leeds,  surveyor. — • — 
These  tracts  were  recorded  to  John  Budd,  Esq ;  of  Morris 
County  deceased. 

Five  thousand  acres  of  exceeding  fine  uplands,  swamps 
and  meadows,  in  Hardwick,  Sussex  county,  having  twen- 
ty-two farms,  already  tenanted,  whose  leases  expire  in 
two  years.  Each  farm  has  a  quantity  of  English  meadow. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  I  5 

and  one  hundred  apple  trees,  with  other  fruit  trees.  Paw- 
1  in's  kill  runs  through  the  track,  where  are  fine  conve- 
niences for  iron  works,  or  mills,  having  plenty  of  water, 
good  falls,  and  plenty  of  timber,  which  can  be  carried 
from  this  tract,  by  water,  down  the  kill  about  six  miles  to 
Delaware,  and  then  to  Easton,  Trenton,  and  Philadelphia. 
Andover  furnace  is  about  ten  miles  from  it,  and  a  good 
road  all  that  way. 

Two  thousand  acres  in  Newtown,  joining  to  and  all 
round  the  New  Stone  Court-House,  in  Sussex  county 
aforesaid,  whereon  is  a  new  town  regularly  laid  out,  and 
already  begun  to  be  built;  the  land  is  good  and  well  tim- 
bered, having  exceeding  fine  swamps,  and  meadow,  con- 
venient for  the  town.  There  are  fine  stones  for  lime  and 
building,  which  hammers  well,  and  good  sand,  all  within 
a  mile  of  said  town  and  Court-House. 

Six  hundred  acres,  at  the  head  of  Pohatconk,  in  Mans- 
field, Sussex  county.  Inquire  of  Thomas  Newman. 

Three  hundred  acres,  on  Pawlin's  kill  aforesaid,  about 
four  miles  above  the  said  Court-House,  joining  the  land 
of  the  honourable  John  Stevens,  Esq;  with  a  fine  conve- 
niency  for  a  mill,  or  forge,  good  land,  meadow,  and  tim- 
ber. " 

Seven  hundred  and  fifty  acres,  in  Mendon,  Morris 
county,  in  three  parts,  having  three  tenements,  well  tim- 
bered, and  good  land.  Inquire  of  James  Lossey,  near  the 
same. 

Five  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  excellent  upland  and 
fine  swamp,  in  Morris  Town,  and  county  of  Morris,  join- 
ing the  seat  of  the  Right  Honourable  the  Earl  of  Stirling, 
about  ten  miles  from  Elizabeth-Town,  capable  of  very 
great  improvements.  Any  person,  who  shall  incline  to 
purchase  any  of  these  tracts,  or  any  part  thereof,  may  in- 
quire of  the  aforementioned  persons,  of  Ephraim  Darby, 


l6'  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

Esq;  at  Sussex,  New-Town,  or  of  the  Subscriber,  who 
will  give  an  indisputable  title  to  the  same,  and  on  receiv- 
ing a  small  part  of  the  money,  at  signing  the  deeds,  will 
stay  for  the  remainder,  three,  four,  or  six  years,  on  hav- 
ing the  interest  yearly  paid.  JONATHAN  HAMPTON. 
Elizabeth-Town,  Jan.  15,  1768. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  54,  January  18- 
25,  1768. 

To  be  Lett,  for  a  Term  of  4  Years, 
THE  House,  Farm,  and  Ferry,  called  WEEHAKEN,  in 
the  Township  of  Bergen,  opposite  to  Greenwich,  within 
three  Miles  of  the  City  of  New- York,  from  whence  a  con- 
stant Ferry  is  kept.  Any  Person  inclining  to  hire  the 
same,  may  apply  to  William  Bayard,  the  Owner  thereof, 
who  will  agree  for  the  same.  The  Possession  to  be  given 
the  2ist  of  March  next. — The  New  York  Mercury,  No. 
846,  January  18,  1768. 

New-York,  January  21.  As  a  further  Specimen  of  the 
Practicability  of  manufacturing  our  own  Clothes  in  this 
Country,  we  can  assure  the  Public  of  the  following  Per- 
sons in  Woodbridge  in  New-Jersey,  making  in  their  re- 
spective Families,  within  the  Year  past,  both  Woolen  and 
Linen  of  their  own  raising,  the  Quantities  following,  viz. 
Mr.  Isaac  Freeman,  599  Yards,  Mr.  James  Smith,  567 
Yards,  and  Mr.  Nathaniel  Heard,  414  Yards. 

THE  subscriber  intending  to  remove 
to  New- York,  in  May  next,  proposes 
to  sell  on  reasonable  terms,  two  fine 
lots  of  land,  (advantageously  situate 
for  a  gentleman,  a  merchant,  or  a 
tradesman,  in  the  pleasant  town  of 
Princeton,  the  dimensions  of  each  of 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  I? 

the  said  lots  being  about  55  feet  in  front  and  200  long) 
with  the  houses  and  improvements  on  one  of  them,  which 
lies  on  the  corner  of  the  Hopewell  road  directly  opposite 
to  the  college,  and  are  as  follows,  viz.  A  large  house  two 
stories  and  a  half  high,  four  rooms  on  a  floor,  with  a  fire- 
place in  each,  all  neatly  and  completely  finished,  with  a 
cellar  under  the  whole  house,  a  stable  and  gardens,  a  small 
yard  between  the  garden  and  the  house,  neatly  paved  with 
brick,  with  a  well  of  excellent  water  within  four  feet  of 
the  kitchen.  The  other  lot  adjoins  to  Mr.  Taylor's,  is 
almost  opposite  to  the  college,  and  the  best  in  the  town 
for  any  gentleman  inclining  to  build.  Whoever  inclines 
to  purchase,  may  apply  to  Mr.  JOHN  RAMSEY,  merchant, 
in  New-York,  near  the  Fly-market,  or  to  the  subscriber  in 
Princeton,  and  agree  upon  terms:  It  will  be  required, 
that  one  quarter  of  the  purchase  money  be  paid  down,  and 
good  security  given  for  the  remainder,  for  which  any  rea- 
sonable time  of  payment  will  be  allowed. 

JOHN  FORREST. 

Bromley,  joth  December,  1767. 
To  BE  SOLD,  by  the  Subscriber, 

A  Tract  of  Land,  containing  sev- 
eral   Hundred   Acres,    situate   in    the 
Township  of  Bedminster,  and  County 
of  Somerset,  in  New-Jersey,  adjoin- 
ing the  Mills,  late  Andrew  Leake's. 
Several  very  excellent  Farms  may  be 
made  on  the  Tract,  as  the  Soil  and 
Situation  are  inferior  to  none  in  the  Province.     Wood, 
Water,  and  Meadows  abound  in  great  Perfection,  and  the 
Lands  capable  of  any  Degree  of  Improvement.    One  Third 
Part  of  the  Principal  to  be  paid  down.    Bonds  with  Secur- 


1 8  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

ity  will  be  taken  for  the  Residue,  and  very  reasonable 
Terms  allowed.     Inquire  on  the  Premises,  of 

JOHN  CAREY. 

— The  Nezv  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser, 
No.  1307,  January  21,  1768. 

On  the  first  day  of  March  next,  at  10  o'clock  in  the 
morning,  will  begin  the  sale,  by  public  vendue.  at  Cun- 
ningham's tavern,  in  Allen-town,  New- Jersey,  the  follow- 
ing HOUSES,  LOTS,  TRACTS  of  LAND,  and  PLANTATIONS, 
late  the  estate  of  THOMAS  LAURIE,1  viz. 

A  LOT  in  Allen-town,  containing  about  fifteen  acres, 
on  which  are  a  large  commodious  well-finished  dwelling- 
house,  with  a  kitchen  and  store,  having  extraordinary 
good  cellars  under  them,  a  garden  adjoining,  with  a  vari- 
ety of  roots  and  flowers,  and  a  young  apple  orchard  of 
the  best  grafted  fruit. 

One  other  good  dwelling-house,  pork  and  grain  store. 

A  plantation  and  tract  of  land,  now  in  the  tenure  of 
John  Huggins,  within  one  mile  of  Allen-town  in  the  town- 
ship of  Upper  Freehold,  containing  about  200  acres,  a 
considerable  part  of  which  is  improved  low  and  upland 
meadow,  with  a  good  dwelling-house,  barn,  orchard,  and 
a  spring  of  excellent  water  within  a  few  yards  of  the  door. 
The  place  is  well  \vatered,  and  esteemed  a  very  good 
farm. 

A  plantation  and  tract  of  land,  in  Upper  Freehold  town- 
ship aforesaid,  near  Allen-town  containing  100  acres,  or 
thereabouts,  about  12  acres  whereof  is  very  good  improved 

i  Thomas  Laurie  was  a  storekeeper  at  Allentown.  His  grandfather. 
Thomas  Laurie,  brother  of  Gawen  Laurie,  came  to  America  in  1683. 
with  two  children.  James,  who  probably  married  Sarah  dau.  of  William 
Redford,  of  Freehold,  and  Anna,  who  married  John  Hebron.  His  will, 
dated  March  6,  1712-13,  was  proved  August  2,  1714.  His  son  James 
bought  land  near  Allentown  in  1705,  and  there  spent  the  remainder  of 
his  days.  He  had  two  sons,  William  and  Thomas. — Baiter's  Hist.  Mon- 
mouth  and  Ocean  Counties,  Appendix,  xxxvi;  N.  J.  Archives,  XXIII.,  286, 
377. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  19 

meadow,  part  of  the  remainder  cleared,  and  is  good  wheat 
and  corn  land. 

A  tract  of  land,  called  SPRING-GARDEN,  in  New  Wind- 
sor township,  within  two  miles  of  Allen-town,  containing 
1 02  acres,  with  a  small  dwelling-house,  and  young  apple 
orchard;  a  few  acres  of  this  land  is  cleared,  and  the  re- 
mainder remarkably  well  timbered  and  watered. 

A  lot,  containing  6  acres  cedar  swamp,  on  Davenport 
Brook,  in  Monmouth  county. 

One  ditto,  containing  seven  acres  ditto,  purchased  of 
the  executors  of  Jonathan  Thomas. 

One  ditto,  containing  12  acres,  in  company  with  Will- 
iam Lawrie,  on  Union  and  Wrangle  Brooks,  in  Mon- 
mouth county. 

One  ditto,  containing  12  acres  of  pine  land,  in  said 
county,  on  a  stream  of  water,  suitable  for  erecting  a  saw- 
mill, and  near  the  mill  formerly  Jonathan  Thomas's. 

Four  acres  of  pine  land,  on  a  bank,  called  MAWAY 
PAQUA. 

A  tract,  containing  400  acres  of  good  land,  on  Otter 
Creek,  near  Crown  Point. 

A  right  for  one  third  of  500  acres  of  pine  land  (part 
of  which  is  taken  up)  and  saw-mill  erected  on  the  same, 
at  Wading-river,  in  Burlington  county. 

A  right  to  50  acres  of  good  land,  to  be  taken  up  in  the 
Eastern  Division  of  New-Jersey. 

A  right  to  30  acres  of  ditto,  ....  ditto,  .... 
ditto. 

A  small  Proprietary  right  in  the  Western  Division  of 
ditto. 

A  store  house  and  landing,  on  Crosswick's  Creek,  in  the 
township  of  Nottingham  and  county  of  Burlington. 

The  conditions  of  purchase  will  be  made  known,  on  the 
day  of  sale.  For  further  particulars,  enquire  of  SAMUEL 


2O  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

ALLINSON,  Attorney  at  Law,  in  Burlington,  or  JAMES  and 
DRINKER,  Merchants,  in  Philadelphia.— 

To  BE  RENTED. 

The  FERRY  over  Delaware,  commonly  called  Dunks' s 
Ferry,  near  the  mouth  of  Neshamminy,  in  Bucks  county 
Pennsylvania,  about  16  miles  from  Philadelphia,  on  the 
great  road  to  Burlington.  It  is  a  very  good  situation  for 
a  tavern,  there  being  a  great  number  of  travellers  passing 
that  way,  both  by  land  and  water.  There  is  a  good  house 
for  the  purpose,  and  100  acres  of  good  LAND,  with  proper 
ferry-boats  in  good  order.  To  be  entered  on  in  May  next. 
For  further  particulars,  enquire  of  JOHN  KIDD,  near  the 
premises.  • 

To  be  SOLD  by  the  subscriber,  the  following  tracts  of 
land,  lying  in  the  county  and  township  of  Gloucester,  west 
New- Jersey,  and  may  be  entered  on  the  ist  of  March  next. 

Chestnut  Grove,  being  a  plantation  containing  200  acres 
of  land,  situated  in  the  forks  of  Great  Timber  Creek, 
within  three  quarters  of  a  mile  of  a  good  landing,  whereon 
is  a  dwelling-house,  barn,  stables  and  other  out-houses, 
about  80  acres  of  cleared  land  in  good  fence,  20  whereof 
is  meadow,  with  a  constant  stream  of  water  running 
through  the  same;  8  acres  of  young  bearing  orchard,  the 
land  is  fresh  and  good,  having  lately  been  cleared,  about 
a  mile  from  a  good  grist-mill,  and  about  the  same  distance 
from  a  Presbyterian  Meeting-house,  9  or  10  miles  from 
Philadelphia. 

Also  a  tract  of  wood-land,  within  2  miles  of  the  afore- 
said plantation,  and  about  2  miles  from  a  landing,  con- 
taining 275  acres,  about  half  a  mile  from  2  saw-mills. 

Also  about  5  or  6  acres  of  cedar  swamp,  between  9 
and  10  miles  from  the  aforesaid  plantation. 

Likewise  a  lot  of  ground  in   Philadelphia,   in   Fifth- 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS,  21 

street,  between  Arch  and  Race-streets,  being  14  feet  front, 
and  50  deep,  whereon  is  a  two  story  brick  house. 

Also  a  lot  of  ground  adjoining  the  same,  14  feet  front, 
and  50  feet  deep. 

For  terms  of  sale,  apply  to  Lazarus  Pine,  senior,  living 
on  the  aforementioned  plantation,  or  to  Lazarus  Pine, 
junior,  in  Fifth  street,  Philadelphia. 

N.  B.  Likewise  a  young  hearty  Negroe  wench,  18 
years  old,  has  had  the  small-pox  and  meazels,  and  is  fit 
for  town  or  country. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No. 
2039,  January  21,  1768. 

Lately  Published,  and  to  be  Sold  by 

WILLIAM  and  THOMAS  BRADFORD, 

At  their  BOOK-STORE,  adjoining  the  LONDON 

COFFEE  HOUSE, 

SERMONS 

ON  THE 

Most  USEFUL  and  IMPORTANT 

SUBJECTS 

ADAPTED  TO  THE 

FAMILY  AND  CLOSET 

By  the  Rev.  SAMUEL  DAVIES,  A.  M. 

Late  President  of  the  College  of  Princetown  in 

New  Jersey.  In  THREE  VOLUMES. 

N.  B.  These  Sermons  were  published  for  the  Benefit 
of  the  Author's  Family,  and  have  been  so  acceptable  in 
England,  that  a  second  Edition  was  soon  called  for;  and 
the  Editor  has  been  encouraged,  by  the  Value  set  on  these 
three  Volumes,  to  prepare  another  Collection,  which  he 
purposes  to  favour  the  Public  with,  in  two  other  Volumes.1 
— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1311,  January  21,  1768. 

i  The  three  volumes  were  printed  and  published  in  London,  in  1766. 
The  two  additional  volumes  were  published  in  London  in  1771. 


22  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Boston,  January  18.  The  mortal  Distemper  which 
lately  prevailed  among  the  Horses  at  New- York,  New- 
Jersey,  Pennsylvania,  &c.  is  now  very  prevalent  with  the 
Horses  in  this  Province. — The  Nezv  York  Journal  or 
General  Advertiser,  No.  1308,  January  28,  1768. 

NEW- YORK,  January  18. 

Tuesday  last  Capt.  Harrison  arrived  here  in  1 1  Days  from 
Ocracock,  in  North  Carolina;  by  whom  we  hear  of  the 
Arrival  of  Capt.  Moon,  in  3  Days  from  Philadelphia,  and 
Capt.  Spinning  in  7  Days  from  Elizabeth-Town. 

One  of  our  Correspondents  from  the  Country  writes 
us  as  follozvs,  viz. 

Amwell,  in  Hunterdon  County,  New- Jersey. 
Messieurs  HALL  and  SELLERS, 

ALTHO'  I  am  one  of  your  constant  Readers,  yet  I  have 
been  a  little  surprized,  that  I  found  no  Mention  made  in 
any  of  the  public  Papers  of  the  Death  or  Character  of 
JOHN  READING,  Esq;  late  of  this  Place,  especially  as  his 
Station  and  Character  was  eminent.  That  God,  who  has 
said,  "The  Righteous  shall  be  had  in  everlasting  Remem- 
brance," no  Doubt  expects  that  we  should  actively  concur 
in  accomplishing  that  sacred  Declaration.  And  besides, 
as  Example  teaches  more  powerfully  than  Precept,  so, 
illustrious  Examples  of  Virtue  being  set  before  us,  excite 
us  to  a  noble  Emulation.  These  Considerations  have  in- 
duced me  to  give  you  the  following  Strictures  of  his  Char- 
acter -  The  God  of  Nature  endowed  Mr.  Reading, 
with  good,  natural  Powers  -  -  -  a  Genius  above  the  com- 
mon Level.  His  Judgment  was  clear  and  manly;  his 
Thoughts  under  good  Command;  his  Expressions  ready 
and  pertinent.  He  justly  supported  the  Character  of  being 
a  strictly  honest  Man ;  one  of  unshaken  Integrity  and  Up- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  23 

Tightness.  He  was  under  the  Advantage  of  an  early  lib- 
eral education;  and  had  his  Mind  enriched  with  an  use- 
ful Store  of  Knowledge  -  -  -  all  which  Things  conspired 
to  qualify  him  to  act  with  Dignity  in  the  several  important 
Stations  in  which  he  was  placed  in  Life;  and  he  had  the 
deserved  Honour  of  being  entrusted  with  some  of  the  most 
important  Offices  in  the  Government.  He  was  early  ap- 
pointed a  Member  of  his  Majesty's  Council  in  this  Prov- 
ince, and  was  twice  the  President-Governor  of  it,  which 
important  Offices  he  executed  with  a  becoming  Dignity, 
Judgment  and  Fidelity.  And  though  distinguished  with 
such  honorable  Trusts,  he  did  not  appear  at  all  elevated 
by  them,  but  behaved  with  that  Meekness  and  Gentleness ; 
that  Evenness  and  Agreeableness,  that  happily  marked  his 
whole  Character;  and  with  Condescension  and  Respect 
to  the  meanest  and  poorest,  as  well  as  to  the  greatest.  He 
was  remarkably  inoffensive  and  cautious  in  his  Conduct, 
and  steady,  solid  and  grave  in  his  Deportment;  yet  he 
was  not  morose  or  sullen,  gloomy  or  impolite.  It  might 
be  said,  without  flattering  Panegyric,  that  he  never  un- 
dertook any  Trust,  to  which  he  was  not  eminently  faith- 
ful, nor  sustained  any  Relation,  whether  of  a  Husband, 
Parent,  Friend,  Counsellor  or  Ruler,  but  he  was  consci- 
entious in  the  Discharge  of  it.  And  he  had  the  rare  Art  of 
doing  worthily  without  appearing  conscious  of  it.  He 
was  temperate  in  his  Enjoyments,  and  charitable  to  the 
Poor;  was  far  from  being  vain  and  showy  in  his  Appear- 
ance; on  the  contrary,  it  was  plain  and  unaffected;  when 
he  spake,  it  was  with  a  natural  Guard  and  Prudence;  sel- 
dom did  an  unguarded  Word  drop  from  his  Lips  -  - 
He  did  not  love  to  deal  in  Calumny  or  Detraction,  or  en- 
gage in  Party  Quarrels,  but  was  a  quiet  and  peaceable 
Member  of  Society;  was  scarcely  known  to  speak  to  the 
Disadvantage  of  any,  even  though  their  Conduct  was  dis- 


24  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

agreeable;  but  prudently  concealed  his  Sentiments  in  his 
own  Breast,  and  suffered  their  own  Actions  to  be  the 
severest  Libel  on  their  Fame.  He  manifested  an  high 
Regard  to  RELIGION,  and  was  a  constant  Attendant  on 
public  Worship;  was  Catholic  in  his  Sentiments,  and 
loved  good  Men  of  every  Denomination  of  Christians  - 
He  had  a  strict  Regard  to  Truth,  and  was  punctual  to  his 
Word  -  -  -  Was  universally  beloved,  and  died  lamented 
on  the  Fifth  Day  of  November  last."1 

To  BE  SOLD, 
At  public  vendue  (if  not  sold  before  at  private  sale)  on 

Thursday,  the  25th  of  February  next, 
THAT  noted  and  long  frequented  tavern  formerly  belong- 
ing to  Samuel  Fleming,  in  the  township  of  Amwell,  county 
of  Hunterdon,  and  province  of  New  Jersey.  There  are 
belonging  to  the  premises,  an  extraordinary  good  house, 
barn  and  stables,  a  new  large  horse-shed,  a  new  pailed 
garden,  a  good  orchard,  and  30  acres  of  good  land,  part 
of  which  is  exceeding  good  meadow,  sufficient  to  supply 
the  tavern  with  plenty  of  good  hay;  the  whole  is  exceed- 
ing well  -watered  by  a  constant  brook  running  through  it. 
It  is  situate  in  the  most  public  part  of  the  country,  and 
the  whole  in  the  best  repair  for  the  conveniency  of  a  public 
house.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the  said  place 
before  the  day  of  public  sale,  may  know  the  conditions  by 
applying  to  the  subscriber,  living  on  the  premises, 

GEORGE  CREED. 

N.  B.  The  subscriber  has  likewise  for  sale,  another 
house  and  lot,  in  the  said  township,  containing  7  acres, 
part  of  which  is  exceeding  good  meadow,  watered  by  a 

iFor  a  sketch  of  John  Reading  see  N.  J.  Archives,  IX.,  5-7,  note.  The 
fullest  account  of  President  of  the  Council  and  Acting  Governor  Reading- 
is  in  that  sumptuous  work.  "Genealogical  and  Biographical  Memorials 
of  the  Reading.  Howell.  Yerkes,  Watts.  Latham,  and  Elkins  Families." 
by  Josiah  Granville  Leach,  LL.  B.,  Philadelphia,  1898,  4to,  pp.  286. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  25 

constant  stream,  situate  on  a  public  road,  and  has  been 
a  tavern  for  many  years,  and  very  convenient  for  a  store, 
a  brewer  or  tanner.  There  are  on  the  said  lot  (besides  a 
good  house)  a  new  barn,  a  good  orchard,  and  garden. 
This  will  likewise  be  sold,  at  public  vendue,  on  the  said 
25th  of  February,  if  not  sold  before  at  private  sale. 

Burlington  County,  January  9,  1768. 
NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  whereas  JOHN  BURR,  ju- 
nior, an  insolvent  debtor  in  said  county,  did  assign  all  his 
estate,  both  real  and  personal,  unto  me.  for  the  use  of  his 
creditors :  Now  these  are  to  desire  the  said  creditors  to 
meet  me  at  the  house  of  Mr.  Daniel  Jones,  innholder,  in 
Mount-holly  on  Saturday,  the  gth  day  of  April  next,  in 
order  to  receive  their  dividend  of  the  monies  in  my  hands. 

JOHN  GOLDBY,  Assignee. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  the  Subscriber,  on  very  reasonable 

Terms, 
The  valuable  INTEREST  where  he  now  lives,  in  Trenton, 

consisting  of 

A  LOT,  67  feet  front  on  King-street,  and  168  feet  back, 
but  as  it  is  a  corner  lot,  it  also  fronts  on  Market  street, 
on  which  is  a  genteel  brick  dwelling-house,  two  stories 
high,  completely  finished,  with  three  rooms  below  stairs, 
and  four  chambers,  besides  apartments  above  for  servants ; 
most  of  the  rooms  are  handsomely  papered,  and  fit  for 
any  gentleman's  family;  to  this  there  is  a  brick  kitchen 
and  wash-house  adjoining,  with  a  pump  in  the  latter,  and 
under  the  whole  there  are  excellent  cellars;  adjoining  to 
this  is  a  frame  house,  which  has  four  good  rooms,  besides 
the  garret  and  places  for  servants,  a  very  convenient  store 
room,  and  country  house  back,  together  with  a  large  store 
house,  built  for  keeping  wet  goods  and  country  produce, 


26  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

and  properly  fitted  for  that  purpose,  with  a  pork  cellar 
under  it. 

Also  a  LOT,  fronting  on  Market-street  55  feet,  and  runs 
through  to  the  lower  street,  on  which  is  a  large  stable,  and 
a  good  carriage-house  that  holds  five  carriages;  the  lot 
contains  about  a  quarter  of  an  acre,  and  is  but  a  few  rods 
distant  from  the  other  lots.  The  whole  is  very  convenient 
for  any  gentleman  inclining  to  carry  on  Trade  in  Trenton, 
as  it  is  the  best  situation  for  that  purpose  in  the  town,  and 
has  heretofore  been  a  place  of  great  business;  or  to  any 
gentleman  inclining  to  live  in  a  pleasant  country  town. 
Any  person  disposed  to  purchase,  may  apply  to  the  sub- 
scriber, and  know  the  terms,  which  are  very  moderate, 
and  reasonable  credit  will  be  given. 

JOSEPH  REED,  jun.1 

Gloucester,  January  23,  1768. 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber,  on  the  2ist  instant,  an 
Irish  servant  man,  named  James  Flannigam,  about  5  feet 
1  1  inches  high,  a  slim  fellow,  a  little  knock-kneed,  fresh 
coloured,  with  short  black  or  brown  hair,  and  has  some- 
thing of  the  brogue  on  his  tongue;  had  on,  and  took  with 
him,  a  new  light  coloured  nap  short  coat,  double  breasted, 
with  two  rows  of  basket  buttons,  red  under  jacket,  blue 
duffield  trowsers,  a  pair  of  buckskin  breeches,  and  one  or 
two  pair  of  ozenbrigs  trowsers,  a  new  Russia  sheeting 
shirt,  and  one  or  two  ozenbrigs  ditto,  a  pair  of  light  blue 
ribbed  stockings,  one  pair  of  black  ditto,  a  pair  of  good 
neats  leather  shoes,  with  square  carved  silver  buckles  in 
them,  a?n  old  beaver  hat,  'which  has  been  bound;  he  also 
took  with  him  an  axe.  Said  servant  went  away  in  com- 
pany with  a  man,  who  has  been  a  soldier  in  the  Royal  Am- 
erican regiment;  the  servant  is  inclinable  to  drink,  and 


a  brief  note  on  Adjutant  General  Joseph  Reed,  see  N.  J.  Archives,. 
X..  5.     And  see  Stryker's  "Battles  of  Trenton  and  Princeton,"  75-78. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  27 

very  quarrelsome  when  in  liquor.  Any  person  that  will 
take  up  and  secure  said  servant,  so  that  his  master  may 
have  him  again,  shall  have  Six  Dollars  reward,  from 

JOSEPH  HUGG. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2040,  January  28, 
1768. 

Whereas,  a  certain  tract  of  land  hath  been  lately  ob- 
tained, in  the  province  of  Nova  Scotia,  lying  on  the  north 
side  of  the  Bason  of  Menis,  called  Philadelphia  Township, 
whereon  some  good  families  are  now  settled  and  many 
more  engaged  to  go :  This  is  to  give  notice,  that  any 
person  inclining  to  become  settlers  on  the  said  land,  will 
meet  with  very  good  encouragement,  the  particulars  of 
which,  will  be  made  known,  by  applying  to  James  James, 
at  Piles  Grove,  Daniel  Lethgow,  at  Salem  Bridge,  James 
Thomson,  at  Hancock's  Bridge,  Benjamin  Davids,  at 
Crosswicks,  John  Jones,  in  Germantown,  or  to  Nathan 
Shepherd,  William  Ball,  John  Lukens,  James  Haldane, 
and  Benjamin  Armitage,  in  Philadelphia.  And  as  a 
proper  vessel  will  be  provided  to  carry  families  and  goods 
to  the  aforesaid  lands,  early  next  spring,  those  who  pur- 
pose to  become  adventurers,  are  desired  to  be  speedy  in 
their  application,  and  enter  into  articles  with  some  of  the 
above-mentioned  persons. 

To  be  SOLD, 

A  Plantation,  situate  in  the  township  of  Mannington, 
within  a  mile  of  the  town  of  Salem,  containing  by  estima- 
tion, about  sixty-one  acres,  whereof  twenty-five  are  cleared 
upland,  with  a  good  log  house  upon  the  same,  eleven  of 
drained  meadow,  all  under  good  fence,  and  twenty-five 
acres  of  woodland :  For  further  particulars  inquire  of  the 
subscriber  in  Salem,  aforesaid. 

JAMES  GARDINER. 


28  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward. 

MADE  his  escape  from  the  sheriff  of  Monmouth  county 
New-Jersey,  — a  certain  Nicholas  Williams,  a  Dutchman 
born;  about  five  feet  and  a  half  high,  well  set,  of  a  swarthy 
complexion,  wears  his  own  strait  brown  hair,  says  his 
mother  lives  near  Germantown,  and  is  supposed  to  be 
thereabouts,  or  else  at  Charles  Read,  Esqr's,  or  some  of 
the  country  iron  works.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
the  above  person  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  goals,  shall  have 
the  above  reward,  by  giving  notice  to 

THOMAS  LEONARD,  Sheriff. 

January  27,  1768. 

BORDENTOWN,  (N.  Jersey)  Jan  23,  1768.  Departed 
this  Life,  greatly  and  deservedly  regreted,  (being  the  Day 
on  ivhich  he  entered  his  twentieth  Year)  Mr.  PETER  IM- 
LAY,  son  of  JOHN  IMLAY,  Esq;  of  this  Place,  after  a  long 
and  painful  Illness,  which  he  underwent  with  the  Forti- 
tude of  a  CHRISTIAN. — He  was  remarkable  for  his  early 
Piety,  and  steady  Course  of  Life,  frequently  expressing  a 
grateful  Sense  of  the  DIVINE  GOODNESS  tozvards  him. 
When  Death  approached,  he  calmly  resigned  his  Breath 
to  him  who  gave  it,  and  with  the  utmost  Composure  of 
Mind  waited  the  Period  that  was  to  relieve  him  from  all 
the  Embarrassments  of  human  Nature. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

ONE  hundred  acres  of  land,  about  twenty  of  which  are 
cleared,  part  meadow,  and  more  may  be  made,  situated 
on  Delaware  river,  between  Trenton  ferry  and  Lamberton, 
and  on  which  there  is  a  valuable  fishery,  and  is  a  pleasant 
part  of  the  country  for  a  gentleman's  seat,  is  also  well  sit- 
uated for  any  person  to  follow  the  boating  business  be- 
tween that  place  and  Philadelphia. — There  is  likewise  a 
constant  stream  of  water  through  the  whole,  which  will 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  29 

be  sold  in  lots  of  fifty  acres,  or  together,  as  best  suits  the 
purchaser.  For  terms  apply  to  the  subscriber  on  the  prem- 
ises, by  whom  an  indisputable  title  will  be  given. 

Jan.  26,  1768.  JOHN  DOUGLASS. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  55,  February  i, 
1768. 

Extract  of  a  Letter  from  a  Gentleman  at  Reedy  Island, 
dated  the  4th  Instant. 

" The  Vessels  now  here,  are  the  Hercules,  Capt.  Ham- 
met,  and  the  Henry  Dawkins,  Capt.  Appleton,  from  Lon- 
don ;  the  Betsey,  Capt.  Caton,  from  Liverpool ;  the  Molly, 
Capt.  Simpson,  from  Antigua,  and,  the  Lark,  Capt.  Peel, 
from  Cork. — — Capt.  Appleton,  on  the  27th  Ult.  the  Day 
before  he  got  into  our  Capes,  spoke  the  Ship  Belfast-Pack- 
et, Capt.  Robinson,  from  Belfast  for  this  Port,  with  sev- 
enty Passengers,  who  had  been  out  sixteen  Weeks,  and 
were  in  great  Distress  for  Want  of  Provisions  and  Water, 
with  which  Capt.  Appleton  supplied  them."-—  The  Penn- 
sylvania Chronicle,  No.  56,  February  1-8,  1768. 

To  the  PUBLIC. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  a  School  is  erected  at  New- 
Brunswick,  in  New- Jersey,  under  the  inspection  of  the 
subscribers,  in  which  the  learned  languages  and  mathemat- 
icks,  are  carefully  and  accurately  taught,  by  Caleb  Cooper, 
recommended  from  Nassau-Hall,  an  able  and  well  accom- 
plished tutor  in  these  and  other  branches  of  literature. 
The  conditions  are  20  s  entrance,  and  £.  4  per  annum, 
for  tuition,  proclamation  money.  Boarding  may  be  had 
in  this  town,  as  good  and  cheap  as  can  be  expected,  and  to 
satisfaction,  sufficient  to  accommodate  a  large  school; 
which,  including  tuition,  will  not  exceed  £.  20  a  year. 

This  town,  besides  its  pleasant  rural  situation,  has  the 


3O  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

superior  advantage  of  a  pure  wholesome  air,  and  its  con- 
comitant, health,  to  recommend  it :  Properties  evinced 
from  long  experience,  by  its  inhabitants,  and  the  suffrage 
of  gentlemen  strangers  acquainted  with  it,  of  the  best 
judgment  and  observation.  It  is  also  surrounded  by  an 
extensive  fertile  country,  from  which  it  draws  constant 
supplies  of  every  necessary  of  life  in  great  variety  and 
plenty;  and  from  the  sea,  in  the  season,  has  plenty  of 
fish,  oysters,  &c.  To  which  may  be  added,  the  ready  and 
easy  conveyance  of  letters  and  goods,  by  water  or  by  land 
to  New- York,  Philadelphia,  and  all  other  parts,  as  another 
peculiar  advantage  it  enjoys.  And  in  a  religious  view, 
exceeds  any  other  place  in  the  province,  having  divine 
worship  performed  in  the  English  episcopal,  the  Dutch 
reformed,  and  presbyterian  churches,  and  as  to  the  inhab- 
itants with  regard  to  their  manners  and  other  social  vir- 
tues, compared  with  other  places,  without  prejudice,  may 
be  said  to  be  irreproachable.  The  inspection  above  pro- 
posed, is  to  consist  in  visiting  the  school  at  leas-t  once  a 
quarter;  to  enquire  into  the  deportment  of  all  concerned, 
and  to  assist  the  master  and  scholars  in  all  necessary  reg- 
ulations with  respect  to  decency  and  good  order,  as  well 
as  the  advancement  of  learning. 

JOHN  LAIGHT, 

JACOB  G.  HARDENBERGH, 

JOHANNIS  M.  VAN  HARLINGER, 

ABRAHAM-  BEACH, 

JOHN  COCHRAN, 

WILLIAM  OAKE. 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  CHARGES. 

RuN-away  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  Chesterfield, 
Burlington  County,  West  New-Jersey,  an  Irish  servant 
man  named  Francis  Nevill,  about  20  years  of  age,  5  feet 
8  inches  high,  is  pretty  talkative,  and  has  much  of  the 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  31 

brogue;  fresh  complexion,  with  yellowish  brown  hair; 
by  trade  a  wool-comber:  Had  on  when  he  went  away, 
a  brown  homespun  coat,  with  cat-gut  buttons,  and  pewter 
tops;  a  snuff  colour 'd  cloth  jacket,  with  mohair  buttons 
and  white  lining;  blue  everlasting  breeches,  blue-grey 
stockings,  and  a  new  castor  hat;  a  pair  of  shoes  with  hob- 
nails in  the  heels.  He  took  with  him  a  purple  flower'd 
flannel  jacket,  one  fine  shirt,  and  two  of  ozenbrigs;  two 
pair  of  yarn  stockings,  and  about  three  or  four  pounds  in 
money.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so 
that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  the  above 
reward,  paid  by  SAMUEL  SYKES. — The  New  York  Mer- 
cury, No.  848,  February  i,  1768. 

New-York,  February  4.  By  a  written  Account  from 
Richmond  County  on  Staten-Island,  and  by  a  Gentleman 
who  brought  it,  and  was  himself  a  Sharer  in  the  Calam- 
ity, we  are  acquainted  with  the  following  Scene  of  Dis- 
tress, viz. 

On  Thursday  Night,  the  28th  January,  between  7  and 
8  o'Clock,  the  Weather  extremely  cold,  and  the  Ground 
cover'd  with  Snow,  the  following  Persons  went  from  the 
Blazing  Star,  in  New-Jersey,  to  cross  the  Ferry  to  Staten- 
Island,  (the  Wind  being  moderate  and  fair,  and  the  Pas- 
sage judged  to  be  very  safe)  viz.  Mr.  William  Cornelius 
George,  supposed  to  belong  to  Rhode-Island;  and  Col. 
Kalb,  a  German  Gentleman;  both  lately  arrived  at  Phila- 
delphia from  London.  Mr.  Robert  French,  lately  arrived 
at  Philadelphia  from  St.  Kitts.  Mr.  John  Kidd,  of  Phil- 
adelphia. Merchant.  John  Thomson,  (who  has  a  Wooden 
Legg)  Stage  Driver.  William  Bury,  and  a  Lad,  belong- 
ing to  the 'Ferry,  (the  Lad  was  lately  Cabin  Boy  to  a  Ship 
from  London  to  New- York,  where  he  left  the  Ship,  al- 
ledging  that  the  Captain  had  misused  him).  A  Negro 
Man,  belonging  to  Mr.  Newry  of  the  Jersies,  and  a  Negro 


32  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

Man,  belonging  to  Mr.  Provoost  of  this  City,  in  all  9  Per- 
sons, and  4  Horses.  As  they  were  crossing  the  Ferry  in  a 
Scow,  a  violent  Wind  suddenly  arose  at  N.  W.  whereby 
they  were  driven  a  considerable  Way  down  the  River,  and 
ashore  on  a  Mud  Bank,  where  the  Scow  was  half  filled 
with  Water;  but  as  it  was  impracticable  to  land  at  that 
Place,  they  were  obliged  to  put  off  again,  and  in  their  Ef- 
forts to  gain  the  Land  broke  two  of  their  Oars,  and  were 
soon  driven  ashore  upon  a  small  Marsh  Island,  in  the 
Mouth  of  the  Fish-Kill  Creek,  about  half  a  Mile  distant 
from  the  Ferry-House,  where  the  Scow  immediately  fill'd, 
and  the  People  and  Horses  were  obliged  to  get  out.  The 
Mud  was  so  soft,  that  the  Men  sunk  in  it  to  near  the  upper 
Part  of  the  Thigh,  and  were  not  able  to  pull  out  their  Feet, 
without  lying  down  on  the  Water  and  Mud,  and  assisting 
with  their  Hands;  but  with  great  Difficulty  they  at  last 
all  got  to  the  highest  Part  of  the  Marsh :  The  poor  lame 
man  was  rendered  more  helpless,  by  breaking  his  Wooden 
Leg.  Three  Horses  not  being  able  to  disengage  them- 
selves from  the  Mud,  stuck  there  and  perished.  The  Peo- 
ple on  their  small  Portion  of  Marsh,  deep  cover'd  with 
Snow,  had  not  the  least  Shelter  from  the  freezing  Blasts 
of  the  Wind,  nor  could  they  make  themselves  be  heard  by 
the  People  on  Shore,  the  Wind  being  against  them.  They 
had  no  other  Resourse  than  to  huddle  as  close  together  and 
give  themselves  as  much  Motion  as  possible.  It  was  then 
about  9  o'Clock,  the  Boy  soon  gave  out  and  sunk  down,  but 
the  Men  took  him  up,  shook  him,  and  did  all  they  could  to 
exercise  and  heat  him;  but  at  about  Eleven  he  expired. 
At  one  o'Clock,  Mr.  George,  who  had  till  then  seem'd  to 
bear  up  as  well  as  any  of  them,  began  to  faulter,  and  not- 
withstanding the  best  Assistance  his  Fellow-Sufferers 
could  give  him,  he  expired  at  about  three  o'Clock,  the 
Rest  lived  out  the  dreadful  Night,  and  at  last,  almost  quite 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  33 

spent  and  hopeless,  at  about  nine  o' Clock  in  the  Morning, 
were  disco ver'd,  and  with  proper  Help,  for  they  had  all 
nearly  lost  the  Use  of  their  Limbs,  they  were  carried  to 
Mr.  Mersereau's  and  all  possible  Care  taken  of  them.  Col. 
Kalb,  after  taking  off  his  Boots  immediately  put  his  Feet 
in  cold  Water,  where  he  held  them  near  half  an  Hour,  dur- 
ing which  he  took  some  Refreshment,  and  then  went  to 
Bed  and  slept  soundly  till  the  Afternoon :  And  he  was 
the  only  Person  that  escaped  without  Hurt.  The  Rest 
sat  up,  round  the  Fire,  and  are  terribly  frost  bitten;  it  is 
fear'd  they  will  all  lose  their  Toes,  and  that  the  Feet  and 
Legs  of  some  are  in  Danger;  an  Ear  of  one  of  the  Negroes 
seems  entirely  perish'd.  Mr.  French,  Mr.  Kidd.  John 
Thomson,  Wm.  Bury,  and  the  two  Negroes  when  this  Ac- 
count came  away,  were  at  Mr.  Mersereau's  Ferry-House, 
opposite  to  the  Blazing  Star,  unable  to  travel.  The  two 
dead  Bodies  were  carried  to  the  same  Place  for  interment; 
the  Coroner's  Inquest  having  first  sat  on  them.  Mr. 
George,  (said  to  be  a  Man  of  good  Family  and  Fortune) 
was  buried  on  Sunday  last,  with  proper  Solemnity.  His 
Effects  are  in  the  Hands  of  the  Coroner,  till  claimed  by 
his  Friends.  Col.  Kalb,  proceeded  on  his  Journey,  and 
arrived  here  on  Monday  last.  The  Horses  belonged  to 
Mr.  Mersereau. 

Many  Horses  having  been  stole  in  Pennsylvania  within 
a  few  Months  past,  they  got  Intelligence  lately,  that  sev- 
eral had  been  sold  cheap  at  Whippany  and  Acquackonock 
in  the  Jersies,  which  were  supposed  to  be  stole,  whereupon 
a  Man  from  Bucks-County  went  thither  a  few  Days  ago, 
and  found  and  recovered  one  that  had  been  stolen  from 
him,  and  'tis  supposed  others  might  do  the  same. 

New-Brunswick,  28th  Jan.  1768. 

THE  Subscriber  intending  to  remove  with  his  Family 
to  Great-Britain,  in  the  Spring,  desires  that  all  those  who 


34  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

are  indebted  to  him,  will  immediately  discharge  their  Ob- 
ligations. And  if  any  Persons  have  any  Demands  upon 
him,  they  are  desired  to  bring  them  in.  He  has  to  dispose 
of  (to  be  delivered  when  he  embarks,  probably  the  Be- 
ginning of  May)  Two  healthy,  likely  Negro  Wenches, 
one  about  29  Years  of  Age,  unmarried.  The  other  about 
24  Years  old,  married,  has  a  very  likely  Child  (a  Girl) 
about  4.  Years  old,  and  has  had  no  Children  since.  The 
Wenches  have  both  had  the  Small-Pox,  and  can  be  rec- 
ommended from  seven  Years  Experience,  as  sober,  hon- 
est, good  Servants ;  also,  a  healthy,  likely  spry  made 
Negro  Boy,  about  19  Years  of  Age;  also,  a  very  good 
Horse  and  Chair,  and  sundry  Houshold  Furniture.  For 
further  Particulars  inquire  of  the  Subscriber,  or  Capt. 
William  Merceir,  within  a  few  Doors  of  the  Coffee-House, 
in  New- York. 

WILLIAM  DONALDSON. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1309,  February  4,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  February  4 

Last  Friday  Evening  the  Roof  of  the  Court-House  at 
Gloucester,  took  Fire,  by  a  Spark  from  the  Chimney, 
which  greatly  damaged  the  same;  but  by  the  timely  As- 
sistance of  the  Inhabitants,  the  Building  was  preserved. 

To  be  LETT, 

A  PLANTATION  at  Clemmell  Creek,  in  Gloucester  coun- 
ty, about  14  miles  from  Gloucester,  containing  300  acres, 
all  within  good  banks,  250  is  in  good  order  for  grazing  or 
mowing,  with  sundry  utensils  for  farming,  and  may  be 
entered  on  the  25th  of  March  next.  For  further  particu- 
lars, enquire  of  JOSEPH  MORGAN,  at  Pensawkin,  in  West 
New-Jersey,  or  CHARLES  WEST,  in  Philadelphia,  near 
Vine-street. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  35 

STOLEN  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  the  township  of 
Arhwell,  in  the  county  of  Hunterdon,  in  the  night  of  the 
25th  of  January  last,  a  bay  GELDING,  13  hands  and  3 
inches  high,  with  a  star  on  his  forehead,  has  neither  brand 
nor  ear-mark,  and  has  a  feather  on  each  side  his  jaws,  has 
lately  had  the  distemper,  and  has  a  scar  on  the  under  side 
of  his  jaws,  another  on  the  inside  of  his  thigh,  and  is  low 
in  flesh.  Whoever  takes  up  the  said  horse,  and  secures 
him,  so  that  the  owner  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
the  reward  of  Twenty  Shillings,  and  all  reasonable  char- 
ges; and  for  the  thief  and  horse  the  sum  of  Three  Pounds, 

paid  by  me 

NOAH  HIXON. 

A  LIST  of  LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post-Office, 
Philadelphia 

A.  James  Anderson,  New-Jersey. 

B.  Jonathan  Bowen,  Esq;   Cumberland  County,   New- 

Jersey. 

C.  Hugh  Creighton,  Joseph  Clemens,  Haddonfield,  N. 

Jersey.     George  Curtis,  Little  Egg  Harbour. 

H.     Robert  Hunt,  Cole's  Town,  N.  Jersey 

M.     George  Middleton,  N.  Jersey;    Thomas  Miller,  Ox- 
ford, West  Jersey. 

P.     Thomas  Perkinson,  Evesham,  W.  Jersey. 

R.     Saunders    Robinson,    Gloucester,    W.    Jersey. — The 

Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2041,  February  4,  1768. 

TO  BE  SOLD, 

A  Very  valuable  and  well  situated  plantation  and  tract 
of  land,  in  the  township  of  Alloway's  Creek,  Salem 
county,  and  province  of  West  New  Jersey;  containing 
about  600  acres,  with  good  brick  buildings,  barn,  out- 
houses, orchards,  timber,  wild-marsh,  meadow  ground, 
and  clear'd  land,  in  proportion;  with  every  other  con- 


36  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

veniency,  either  for  producing  grain  or  grazing.  For  par- 
ticulars inquire  of  William  Hewlings,  Esq;  at  Burling- 
ton, John  Hart,  in  Philadelphia;  Joseph  Hart,  at  Port- 
Penn;  Edward  Test,  Esq;  at  Salem,  or  Samuel  Oakford, 
on  the  premises. 

N.  B.  Any  reasonable  time  will  be  given,  for  payment 
of  the  purchase  money,  giving  security  if  required,  and 
paying  interest. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1313, 
February  4,  1768. 

February  13,  1768. 

TAKEN  up,  adrift,  about  the  eighth  of  January  last,  at 
the  Mouth  of  Cohansey  Creek,  a  Moses  built  Boat,  about 
the  Size  of  a  Ship's  Yawl.  Whoever  has  lost  the  same, 
by  applying  to  Benjamin  Reeve,  living  in  Greenwich 
Town,  Cumberland  County,  West  New-Jersey,  proving 
their  Property,  and  paying  Charges,  may  have  it  again. 

Captain  Ashmead.  who  arrived  here  on  Saturday  last 
from  Barbados,  gives  us  the  following  intelligence,  viz. 
—That  Capt.  Singleton,  in  the  Ship  Patient  Mary, 
was  also  arrived  at  Barbados  from  hence,  but  that  three 
Days  after  he  left  the  Capes,  he  lost  fifteen  Oxen,  off  of 
his  Deck  in  a  Gale  of  Wind. 

ARRIVALS  at  Barbados  -       -  extracted  from  the  Bar- 
bados Mercury. 

Captain  Hibbert,  from  Salem. — The  Pennsylvania 
Chronicle,  No.  57,  February  8-15,  1768. 

Philadelphia,  February  i.  We  hear  from  Amwell,  in 
New-Jersey,  that  on  the  5th  of  November  last,  the  Hon- 
ourable JOHN  READING,  Esq;  late  President  of  His  Maj- 
esty's Council  for  that  Province,  died  there,  in  an  ad- 
vanced Age,  much  lamented  for  his  many  great  and  emi- 
nent Virtues. 


/ 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  37 

THE  creditors  of  Abraham  Clark,  Ter.  late  of  Elizabeth- 
Town,  an  insolvent  debtor,  are  desired  to  meet  at  the 
House  of  Broughton  Reynolds,  in  Elizabeth-Town,  on 
Monday  the  second  day  of  May  next,  at  2  o' Clock,  P.  M. 
to  receive  a  dividend  of  what  money  yet  remains  in  the 
hands  of  the  assignees. 

RECOMPENCE  STANBURY 
NOAH  MARSH. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  now  living  on  the  prem- 
ises, (and  if  not  sold  by  the  first  of  April,  then  to  be  let,) 
a  PLANTATION,  containing  335  acres,  whereof  there  is 
about  250  clear 'd,  and  in  good  fence,  with  about  25  acres 
of  extraordinary  good  meadow,  that  yearly  produces  two 
crops ;  as  also  may  be  made  70  acres  more  of  rich  swamp 
meadow,  at  a  very  small  expence.  The  remainder  of  the 
tract  good  wood  land;  There  is  also  125  acres  of  wood 
land  may  be  further  had,  if  required.  There  is  on  the 
premises  a  good  new  farm  house,  with  four  rooms  on  the 
lower  floor,  and  four  above,  with  a  good  kitchen  24  by 
20  feet,  and  a  leinter  to  the  kitchen  for  servants,  with  good 
cellars  under  the  whole  building;  there  is  also  a  good  new 
barn,  well  finished  and  covered  with  cedar,  50  by  24  feet, 
with  a  good  plank  floor,  and  stables,  compleatly  done. 
Also  two  large  fram'd  corn  cribs,  made  in  the  best  manner, 
and  other  useful  houses  to  accommodate  the  plantation. 
There  is  also  a  good  young  orchard  of  260  apple  trees  of 
the  best  grafted  fruit;  the  -whole  fields  are  well  water'd 
and  never  dry;  the  land  affords  good  pasture  of  clover, 
and  spear  grass.  There  is  also  on  the  said  premises,  a 
good  grist-mill,  with  two  pair  of  the  best  Esopus  stones 
that  could  be  had,  and  remarkable  at  New- York  and  Phil- 
adelphia, for  making  the  best  of  flour.  The  houses  is 
large,  and  well  built  with  good  stone  and  lime;  the  bolt- 
ing boxes,  and  lift  jack  for  hoisting  the  meal,  are  all 


38  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

drove  by  water,  and  the  whole  running  geers  of  the  mill 
are  done  in  the  best  manner.  The  mills  are  well  contrived 
for  holding  wheat,  and  stands  on  Asanpunk,  a  stream 
never  failing.  The  whole  of  the  above  premises  being 
about  one  mile  and  an  half  from  Trenton,  30  from  Phila- 
delphia, and  30  from  Brunswick,  and  from  thence  by  water 
to  New- York.  The  said  mills  lie  in  a  fine  wheat  country, 
and  may  be  supplied  with  any  quantity  that  can  be  re- 
quired. The  purchaser  paying  one  fourth  of  the  purchase 
money,  in  three  months,  may  have  ten  years  to  pay  the  re- 
mainder, with  interest.  For  further  particulars,  enquire 
of  the  subscriber. 

SAMUEL  HENRY.1 

THE  Creditors  of  Barnaby  Shute,  of  Elizabeth-Town, 
New -Jersey,  are  desired  to  meet  at  the  Sign  of  the  Mar- 
quis of  Granby,  in  Elizabeth-Town  aforesaid,  on  Friday 
the  eleventh  Day  of  March  next,  by  ten  o' Clock  of  the 
Forenoon  of  the  same  day,  as  the  Subscribers  are  author- 
ized then  and  there  to  deliver  up,  and  assign  over  to  the 
said  Creditors,  divers  Bonds,  Notes,  and  other  Debts,  due 
to  the  said  Barnaby,  provided  the  said  Creditors  will  dis- 
charge the  said  Barnaby  from  their  present  Demands 
against  him;  otherwise,  the  Subscribers  must  then  and 
there  return  to  the  said  Barnaby,  their  several  Bonds, 
Notes,  and  other  Debts,  agreeable  to  the  Trust  reposed  in 
them  by  the  said  Barnaby.2 

WILLIAM  HARRIMAN. 

JOSEPH  WOODRUFF,  Jim. 

i  Samuel  Henry  was  probably  a  native  of  Ireland.  He  was  the  owner 
pf  large  tracts  of  land  in  Trenton  and  elsewhere,  including  "the  old 
iron  works"  in  that  place.  He  was  one  of  the  subscribers  toward  the 
salary  of  the  Rev.  Elihu  Spencer,  of  the  Presbyterian  church  in  Tren- 
ton and  vicinity,  but  was  probably  an  Episcopalian,  as  in  his  will  he 
left  a  contingent  legacy  to  the  English  Church  of  Trenton,  and  was 
buried  in  the  yard  of  that  church.  He  died  May  10,  1784,  aged  67  years. 
— <Hall's  Hist.  Pres.  Church  in  Trenton,  257.  Henry's  iron  foundry  and 
steel  works  were  on  the  Assunpink  creek,  where  it  is  crossed  by  State 
street. — Trenton  One  Hundred  Years  Ago,  by  William  S.  Stryker,  4. 

2 Barnaby  Shute  kept  tavern  in  Elizabethtown  for  many  years.  He 
died  there  March  25,  1797,  in  his  70th  year. 


1768]     .  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  39 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Good  PLANTATION,  in  the  county 
of  Morris,  township  of  Hanover,  con- 
sisting of  1 60  acres  of  good  land, 
OF  1  whereon  is  a  good  dwelling  house,  and 
kitchen,  with  five  fire  places,  a  good 
PLANTATION]  store  house  and  cellar  under  the  same, 
a  large  new  barn,  with  a  fine  young 
orchard,  with  other  good  fruit  trees. 
The  plantation  is  well  watered  and  timbered;  wherein  is 
thirty  acres  of  good  mowing  ground  fit  for  the  scythe, 
consisting  of  English  and  timothy  grass.  Sixty  acres  of 
said  plantation  in  good  fence;  there  is  still  a  large  quan- 
tity of  low  land  to  be  cleared,  which  will  make  good  mow- 
ing ground.  The  Plantation  is  most  pleasantly  situated 
on  the  country  road,  7  miles  (east)  from  Morris-Town 
court  house,  3  miles  (south  west)  from  William  Kelly's 
farm.  2  miles  (south)  from  Mr.  Ogden's  refinery,  one 
mile  from  Pissipenny  meeting  house,  adjoining  to  the 
farm  of  Revd.  John  Darby.  Any  person  having  a  mind 
to  purchase  said  plantation,  may  know  the  conditions,  by 
applying  to  Willian  Kelly,  at  New- York;  or  to  Daniel 
Peirson,  Esq;  at  Newark;  or  to  the  subscriber,  on  the 
premises.  An  indisputable  title  will  be  given,  and  time 
of  payment  allowed  for  one  half  of  the  purchase  money, 
if  desired. 

LEMUEL  BOWER. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
849,  February  8,  1768. 

To  be  SOLD  by  the  Subscriber, 

A  Handsome  well  finished  brick  house,  two  stories  high, 
four  rooms  below  stairs,  and  four  chambers  above  stairs, 
besides  garrets;  the  rooms  above  and  below  stairs  are 


40  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

genteelly  papered,  a  large  dry  cellar  under  the  whole 
house,  properly  divided;  a  convenient  kitchen  adjoining, 
with  chambers  above  for  servants,  situate  in  King-street 
in  Trenton;  the  lot  contains  about  3  quarters  of  an  acre, 
and  extends  through  to  Queen-street,  on  which  are  placed 
the  stables.  Also  several  five  acre  lots  of  meadow,  orch- 
ard and  pasture  lands,  each  good  of  their  kind,  near  and 
convenient  to  the  town;  as  also  a  good  house,  and  new 
large  framed  barn,  with  17  acres  of  excellent  land,  8  acres 
of  which  is  garden,  meadow  and  orchard  of  best  grafted 
fruit;  the  remaining  9  acres  good  woodland.  Its  situa- 
tion renders  it  convenient  for  a  shop-keeper,  tradesman, 
&c.  The  purchaser  may  have  any  of  the  above,  on  very 
moderate  terms,  and  reasonable  credit  given,  with  inter- 
est. 

WILLIAM  PiDGEON.1 

Six  POUNDS  Reward 

Salem,  February  i,  1768. 

RUN  away,  last  night,  from  the  Subscriber,  living  in 
Elsenborough,  Salem  county,  West  New-  Jersey,  the  fol- 
lowing servants.  WALTER  LINDY,  an  Englishman,  born 
in  Wiltshire,  about  24  years  of  age,  about  5  feet  8  or  9 
inches  high,  a  thick,  well  set  fellow,  fresh  coloured,  mark- 
ed with  the  small-pox,  strait  black  hair,  speaks  somewhat 
on  the  West  country  dialect,  and  is  a  still,  sly  fellow;  had 
on,  and  took  with  him,  a  new  light-coloured  homespun 
cloth  jacket,  with  metal  buttons,  lined  with  white  half- 
worn  blanketing,  a  short  blue  sailor's  jacket,  with  the 


?  idiveon  "ved  in  Kin£  <now  Warren)  street,  near  the  pres- 
street  and  was  a  man  of  some  substance.  He  advertised 
Hale,  at  T/ent<?n  in  1758  and  1760.  as  acting  executor  of  Daniel 
JftM  £  -advertised  land  from  1751  to  1761.  Gov.  Franklin  ap- 
pointed him.  March  31.  1774,  a  justice  of  the  peace  in  the  counties  of 
Burlington  and  Monmouth.  In  1756  he  was  one  of  the  managers  of 
rSfr.  w  *•  ^  tteJ70for  finishing  and  completing  the  church  in  that 
He  died  at  Stafford.  Monmouth  county.  January  5,  1780.  from 
^  ^  VI  iUe-ttlnJr  out  of  his  nouse  when  it  was  on  fire.  He  left  £50  to 
«Y,H  *o  SS??*  £.ociety  of  Trenton,  for  the  repair  of  their  meeting  house, 
and  £3,000  to  his  executors,  to  be  used  for  charitable  purposes. 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4! 

sleeves  taken  out,  blue  half -thick  trowsers,  linen  ditto, 
good  shoes,  with  strings,  new  footed  stockings,  two  old 
great  coats,  with  metal  buttons,  and  an  old  check  shirt; 
he  came  in  with  Captain  John  Simons,  from  Waterford, 
last  fall.  MARY  BRIAN,  an  Irish  girl,  born  in  Dublin, 
middle  sized,  fair  complexion,  dark  brown  hair,  pretty 
full  mouth,  very  talkative  and  apt  to  get  drunk,  and  very 
impudent  when  in  drink,  is  about  18  or  19  years  of  age, 
and  has  been  in  the  country  some  years;  had  on,  and  took 
with  her,  a  blue  and  white  striped  short  gown,  striped 
camblet  skirt,  old  blue  quilt  good  linsey  petticoat,  check 
apron,  straw  hat,  half-worn  shoes,  good  calf  skin  pumps, 
and  brass  buckles.  They  have  sundry  other  things,  not 
known,  and  it  is  likely  may  offer  something  for  sale,  to 
get  money  to  travel  with.  Whoever  takes  up  said  ser- 
vants, and  secures  them  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  goals,  so 
as  their  master  may  have  them  again,  shall  have  the  above 
reward  for  both;  or  Five  Pounds  for  the  man  alone,  and 
Twenty  Shillings  for  the  girl,  paid  by 

JOHN  FIRTH. 

N.  B.  It  is  likely  they  may  change  their  names,  and 
pass  for  man  and  wife,  or  part,  and  forge  a  pass,  as  the 
fellow  can  write;  all  masters  of  vessels,  and  others,  are 
forbid  to  harbour  or  carry  them  off  at  their  peril. 

Philadelphia,  February  i,  1768. 

WHEREAS  JACOB  DECAMP,  servant  to  John  Beale 
Boardley  Esq;  of  Baltimore  town,  Maryland;  George 
Jack,  ....  THOMAS  WILKINSON,  alias  SOUTH,  ser- 
vant to  Cornelius  Robbins,  of  Amwell,  New-Jersey; 
....  being  confined  in  the  public  goal  of  this  county, 
as  runaway  servants,  public  notice  is  hereby  given  to  the 
masters  of  the  said  servants,  that  I  intend  to  apply  to  the 
court  of  quarter  sessions,  to  be  held  in  the  city  of  Phila- 
delphia, for  the  county  of  Philadelphia,  on  Monday,  the 


42  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

7th  day  of  March  next,  for  an  order  to  sell  the  said  ser- 
vants for  their  fees,  unless  their  masters  redeem  them 

before  that  time. 

JEHU  JONES,  goaler. 

Gloucester  county,  New- Jersey  Feb.  13,  1768. 

TEN  POUNDS  Reward, 

Broke  out  of  the  goal  of  the  county  of  Gloucester,  this 
morning,  the  following  prisoners,  viz.  HUGH  WILSON,. 
born  in  Ireland,  about  30  years  of  age,  a  tanner  by  trade, 

5  feet  3  or  4  inches  high,  well  set,  has  black  hair,  a  pleas- 
ant countenance,  marked  with  the  small-pox,  has  lived 
lately  in  Chester  and  New-Castle  counties;1    had  on,  .1 
good  blue  surtout,  a  light  coloured  broadcloth  jacket,  and 
swanskin  waistcoat  with  black  spots,  a  pair  of  good  leather 
breeches,  and  a  good  hat.     It  is  thought  he  has  a  large 
quantity  of  money  with  him,  chiefly  gold.     And  DAVID- 
COCHRAN,  born  in  Ireland,  about  25  years  of  age,  5  feet 

6  inches  high,  has  a  freckled  face,  and  red  short  hair,  a 
fuller  by  trade,  and  has  lived  in  Allentown  and  Haddon- 
field;    had  on,  a  light  coloured  homespun  cloth  coat,  a 
striped  jacket,  cloth  breeches,  a  pair  of  half -boots,  and  an 
old  hat;  also  took  a  pair  of  shoes  with  him ;  it  is  supposed 
he  is  gone  towards  Lancaster.     They  are  both  much  in- 
clined to  strong  liquor,  and  apt  to  be  intoxicated.    Who- 
ever takes  up  the  above  prisoners,  and  secures  them  in  any 
goal  in  New- Jersey,  Pennsylvania,  or  the  lower  counties 
on  Delaware,  and  gives  notice  to  the  subscriber,  so  that 
he  may  have  them  again,  shall  receive  for  Hugh  Wilson, 
Six  Pounds  reward,  and  for  David  Cochran,  Four  Poundsr 
and  reasonable  charges,  from 

SAMUEL  BLACKWOOD,  Sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2042,  February  nr 
1768. 

i  See  page  11,  ante. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  43 

To  the  PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS  an  advertisement  has  been  inserted  in  the 
Chronicle,  No.  50,  and  subscribed  by  John  Ration;  in 
which  the  said  Ration,  conscious  of  the  badness  of  his  own 
cause,  has  endeavoured  to  impose  upon  strangers,  [for 
none  else  can  he  deceive]  by  supporting  his  assertions  with 
the  grossest  falsehoods  and  calumny — I  therefore  think 
it  necessary  to  submit  to  the  judgment  of  the  Public,  the 
particulars  of  the  dispute  subsisting  between  us,  in  vindi- 
cation of  my  character  [for  I  have  a  character  to  lose], 
which  has  been  attacked  by  said  Ration,  with  all  that  vir- 
ulence and  disregard  to  truth,  for  which  he  is  so  univer- 
sally distinguished. 

I  have  thought  it  most  prudent  to  proceed,  in  this  affair, 
in  a  manner  the  most  public  and  legal,  and  before  magis- 
trates have  evidences  examined,  whose  testimony  would 
invalidate  his  assertions,  and  expose  him  to  that  censure 

so  total  a  deviation  from  the  truth  justly  deserves. 1 

went  to  his  house,  on  the  gth  instant,  with  Edward  Test, 
Esq;  to  notify  to  him  my  intention,  and  require  his  at- 
tendance, that  he  might  have  an  opportunity  of  confuting 
any  untruth,  if  advanced,  in  the  course  of  examination, 
and  to  convince  him  that  my  design  was  to  proceed  in  a 
fair  open  way;  and  then  I  named  the  I5th  instant  for  the 

day His  wife  told  me  he  was  not  at  home,  and  was 

certain  lie  would  not  attend—  —He  did  not,  but  went  to 

Philadelphia,  on  the  morning  of  the  appointed  day 

The  reason  will  appear  very  evident  from  the  purport  of 
the  following  depositions,  by  which  it  will  be  proved  that 
the  said  Ration  has  most  industriously  avoided  relating 
the  truth,  lest  it  might  appear  an  inconsistency  with  the 
character  he  has  acquired. 

By  the  first  deposition  it  will  appear,  said  Ration  as- 
serted that  the  boy  was  not  subject  to  fits; an  asser- 


44  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

tion  he  was  conscious  to  be  false,  at  the  time  he  made  it, 
being  a  fact  known  in  his  own  family,  and  confessed  by 
the  boy,  when  questioned  about  it —  —That  said  Hatton 
consented  to  take  him  back  again;  received  the  bill  of 
sale  from  me  and  promised  to  surrender  up  the  bond,  upon 
the  return  of  the  boy,  without  any  of  those  conditional 
compensations  he  mentions  so  equitably  to  have  made,  in 
his  advertisement :  And  I  apprehend  his  chief  reason  for 
omitting  the  receipt  of  the  bill  of  sale  was,  that  his  argu- 
ments would  appear  absurd,  and  that  it  was  a  fact  he  did 
not  care  to  reveal  to  the  Public—  .... 
1  have  been  represented,  by  said  Hatton,  as  a  con- 
tentious man,  a  character  my  neighbours  will  acquit  me 
of;  but  if  a  perpetual  state  of  litigious  cavilling,  or  the 
universal  voice  of  a  people  can  give  a  just  title  to  that 
character,  I  am  sure  no  man  can,  with  equal  demerit,  claim 
it  as  JOHN  HATTON,  Esquire,  Collector  of  his  Majesty's 
Customs,  in  the  port  of  Salem. 

Salem,  Jan.  19,  JACOB  SCROGGIN. 

1768. 

Salem,  ss.  JACOB  HOLLINSHEAD,  of  the  town  of  Salem, 
watchmaker,  of  full  age,  personally  appeared 
before  us  the  subscribers,  three  of  his  Majesty's  justices 
of  the  peace,  for  the  county  of  Salem,  who  being  one  of 
the  people  called  Quakers,  on  his  solemn  affirmation, 
which  he  took  according  to  law,  did  declare  and  affirm 

[signed]    JACOB  HOLLINSHEAD. 
Affirmed  before  us  the  I5th 
of  January,  1768. 
A.  SINNICKSON, 
ROB.  JOHNSON, 
JOHN  NICHOLSON. 

Salem,  ss.     THOMAS  ANDERSON,  of  Alloway's  Creek,  in 
the  county  aforesaid,  personally  appeared  be- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4:5 

fore  us  the  subscribers,  three  of  his  Majesty's  justices  of 
the  peace,  for  the  county  aforesaid,  who  being  duly  sworn 
on  the  Holy  Evangelists  of  Almighty  God,  doth  declare, 
that  on  or  about  six  day's  after  Mr.  Jacob  Scroggin  had 
purchased  a  Negro  boy  of  John  Hatton,  Esq;  and  brought 
him  home,  he,  this  deponent,  at  that  time  lived  with  the 
said  Scroggin,  and  that  he  was  in  the  house  when  the  said 
Negro  boy  had  one  fit  or  more. 

his 
THOMAS    x    ANDERSON. 

Mark. 

Sworn  before  us  the  I5th 
of  January,  1768. 

A.   SlNNICKSON, 

ROBT.  JOHNSON, 
JOHN  NICHOLSON. 

Salem,  ss.  JOSEPH  THOMPSON,  of  the  town  of  Salem, 
tanner,  (of  full  age)  personally  appeared  be- 
fore us  the  subscribers,  three  of  his  Majesty's  justices  of 
the  peace,  for  the  county  of  Salem  aforesaid,  who,  being 
one  of  the  people  called  Quakers,  on  his  solemn  affirma- 
tion, which  he  took  according  to  law,  did  declare,1  .  .  . 

[signed]    JOSEPH  THOMPSON. 
and  justices  as  above. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  58,  February  15- 
22,  1768. 

To  BE  SOLD 

By  the  subscriber,  now  living  on  the  premises 
A  Plantation,  containing  about  200  acres  of  land,  (or 
more  if  required)   there  is  about   100  cleared,   the  rest 
woodland,  it  is  accommodated  with  a  genteel  brick  dwell- 
ing-house, 40  by  48  feet,  two  story  high,  four  rooms  on 

iThis  controversy  occupies  two  and  a  half  columns  of  the  Chronicle. 


46  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

a  floor,  with  a  large  handsome  stair  case  and  entry,  with 
cellars  under  the  whole  building,  and  a  court-yard  on  each 
front  of  the  house,  one  fronting  down  the  river  Delaware 
to  the  ferry,  thro'  a  large  handsome  avenue  of  English, 
cherry-trees,  the  other  fronting  up  the  river  to  Trenton, 
with  a  large  brick  kitchen,  30  by  20  feet,  two  story  high, 
with  a  well  in  it,  and  four  handsome  apartments  above  for 
servants;  also  a  good  barn  40  by  38  feet,  with  a  plank 
floor,  and  stables  for  ten  horses;  also  a  good  stone  smoak- 
house,  chaise-house,  poultry  house,  and  all  other  useful 
buildings  to  accommodate  the  same,  with  a  fine  piece  of 
meadow  that  yearly  produces  from  20  to  25  loads  of  good 
clover  and  timothy  hay,  with  an  orchard  of  about  350 
bearing  apple-trees  of  good  fruit;  there  is  also  a  fine  col- 
lection of  other  fruits,  viz.  peaches,  damesens,  cherries, 
quinces,  English  walnuts,  grapes,  raspberries,  &c.  and  a 
handsome  large  garden  well  boarded  in.  The  above  prem- 
ises lying  in  the  county  of  Burlington,  West-New-Jersey, 
and  pleasantly  situated  on  the  river  Delaware,  at  the  head 
of  the  navigation,  and  opposite  the  falls  thereof,  between 
Trenton  and  the  ferry;  there  is  a  great  variety  of  fish  that 
may  be  caught  in  the  river  by  trolling  and  angleing,  and 
plenty  of  duck  and  other  water  fowl  in  the  fall  and  winter 
season.  The  whole  premises  are  in  good  fence  and  repair. 
Also  one  handsome  brick  house,  lately  the  property  of  Rob- 
ert Rutherford,1  and  allowed  the  best  stand  for  a  tavern 
or  a  Gentleman  in  any  part  of  Trenton;  the  house  is  two 
stories  high,  four  rooms  on  a  floor,  and  a  cellar  under  the 
whole  house,  with  a  large  kitchen,  wash  house,  and  a  well 
of  good  water,  four  handsome  rooms  above,  two  large 
stables  that  will  hold  from  20  to  25  horses,  a  good  coach- 
house, a  handsome  large  lot  and  garden,  well  fenced  in  by 
a  brick  wall  at  the  front,  and  large  folding  gates  to  enter 

iFor  a  sketch  of  Robert  Rutherford,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  XX.,  168. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  47 

the  yard;  the  stair-way,  and  three  of  the  rooms  of  the 
house  are  handsomely  papered,  the  whole  in  good  order. 
Also  one  other  house  in  Trenton,  two  stories  high,  three 
rooms  on  a  floor,  and  a  good  cellar,  with  a  large  garden 
of  near  half  an  acre  of  ground,  well  fenced  in,  and  front- 
ing King's-street,  and  at  the  rear  of  the  lot  in  Queen- 
street.  Also  one  other  handsome  house  near  Trenton  mills 
in  Kingsbury,  in  the  township  of  Nottingham,  and  county 
of  Burlington,  one  story  and  an  half  high,  four  rooms  on 
the  lower  floor,  and  two  on  the  upper  floor  with  two  other 
rooms  for  servants,  and  a  cellar  under  the  whole  house  a 
good  well,  a  large  garden  well  boarded  in,  a  barn,  stable, 
chaise  house,  poultry-house,  all  in  good  repair,  and  painted 
in  the  best  manner.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the 
whole,  or  any  one  part  of  the  premises,  by  paying  the  one 
third  part  of  the  purchase  money  down  may  have  any  rea- 
sonable time  for  the  payment  of  the  remainder,  with  in- 
terest. For  further  particulars,  enquire  of  the  subscriber. 
May  n,  1767.  ROBERT  LETTICE  HOOPER. 

N.  B.  The  Gentleman  that  purchases  the  plantation, 
may  be  supplied  with  three  negro  men  and  a  wench,  that 
understands  all  manner  of  farming,  and  was  born  and 
bred  in  the  family,  cattle,  horses,  a  four-wheel  chaise,  fur- 
niture, farming  utensils,  twenty  acres  of  wheat,  six  acres 
of  rye,  and  may  enter  on  any  part  of  the  premises  in  three 
weeks  after  agreement. — Supplement  to  the  New  York 
Gazette  or  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  849,  February  8,  1768. 

To  BE  LET. 

AND  entered  on  the  first  of  April  or  May  next,  the  house 
and  lot  wherein  the  widow  Sarah  Thomas  now  lives,  in 
Elizabeth-Town,  containing  about  three  quarters  of  an 
acre  of  land.  The  house  is  in  good  repair,  has  seven  rooms 
on  a  floor,  and  two  good  cellars  under  the  same,  and  a 


48  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

good  kitchen,  stable,  and  other  out-houses,  and  a  fine 
garden;  the  whole  pleasantly  situated  on  the  post  road 
from  New- York  to  Philadelphia,  in  the  center  of  the  town, 
and  within  six  rods  of  a  good  grist-mill,  and  about  eight 
rods  of  the  court-house;  and  is  a  good  stand  for  a  store 
or  publick  house,  as  it  hath  been  occupied  for  one  or  both 
for  upwards  of  thirty  years  past.  Any  person  inclining 
to  rent  the  same  for  one  year,  or  a  term  of  years,  may 
know  the  conditions  by  applying  to  Edward  Thomas,  liv- 
ing near  the  premises. 

N.  B.  Said  Thomas  has  two  young  negro  wenches  for 
sale,  the  one  with  or  without  two  children;  the  other 
about  fourteen  years  of  age. — The  Nezv  York  Gazette  and 
Weekly  Mercury,  No.  850,  February  15,  1768. 

New  Biasing-Star,  4th  February,  1768. 
To  the  IMPARTIAL  PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS  it  has  been  maliciously  reported;  that  John 
Thomson,  Stage- Waggoner,  was  the  sole  Cause  of  the  un- 
happy Misfortune  which  happened  on  the  28th  last,  we 
who  were  at  that  Time  in  the  Boat,  and  had  come  with  Mr. 
Thomson  from  Princeton,  cannot  refrain  from  clearing 
an  innocent,  suffering  Man,  from  that  false  Imputation 
under  which  he  at  present  labours :  We  do  candidly  own, 
that  he  proffered  staying  at  Woodbridge,  but  we  not  will- 
ingly consenting  to  that  Proposal,  set  off;  when  we  came 
to  the  Ferry,  the  Night  appeared  very  agreeable,  and  we 
all  with  one  Consent  got  into  the  Boat,  when  about  the 
Middle  of  the  River,  a  Storm  came  on,  which  drove  us 
on  a  desert  Island,  where  we  staid  till  next  Morning,  when 
Mr.  Mersereau  came  to  our  Assistance. 

JOHN  KIDD, 
ROBERT  FRENCH. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  49 

To  be  sold,  at  public  Sale,  at  Vendue,  the  2oth  Day  of 
April  1768,  or  at  private  Sale  any  Time  before. 

A  Convenient  House  and  Lot  of 
Ground,  situate,  lying  and  being  in 
Newark,  and  very  convenient  for  a 
Gentleman  or  Tradesman:  For  fur- 
ther Particulars  inquire  of  Mr.  Will- 
iam Camp,  in  Newark,  or  of  Henry 
Sickels,  in  New- York,  who  will  give 
an  indisputable  Title  for  the  same. 

To  be  sold,  at  private  Sale, 
By  the  subscriber,  on  the  Premises,  at  Hackinsack, 

A  Small  convenient  Farm  or  Lot, 
lying  on  a  very  public  Road  from  the 
CUT     1         back  Country,  Ringwood  and  Sterling 
OF  Iron  Works,  &c.  and  on  Hackinsack 

River,  being  the  first  Landing  conve- 
AR1  nient  to  that  Road,  and  very  suitable 

for  a  Merchant  or  Trader.    It  adjoins 
to  the  River,  and  is  dock'd  off  300 
Feet,  and  has  upon  it  the  following  Improvements,  Build- 
ings and  Conveniences,  viz. 

A  very  good  Orchard  and  Garden,  a  good  Dwelling- 
House,  with  a  large  Passage  and  two  Rooms  on  a  Floor, 
five  of  the  Rooms  with  Fire-Places,  and  all  completely  fin- 
ished, the  Chimney  Pieces  tiled,  &c.  A  good  Kitchen,  28 
Feet  by  18,  adjoining  to  one  End  of  the  back  Part,  a  Stone 
Smoke-House,  a  small  Store-House,  near  the  Dwelling- 
House,  with  a  Chimney;  a  fine  Cider  Barn,  an  excellent 
Spring  with  a  Pump,  near  the  Kitchen,  and  a  large  Store- 
House,  three  Stories  high,  on  the  Dock.  The  Dwelling- 
House  is  very  pleasantly  situated,  fronting  on  the  River  on 
one  Side,  and  on  the  other  having  a  View  of  three  large 


50  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Roads  to  the  Distance  of  near  a  Mile  on  each.     Any  Per- 
son inclining  to  purchase,  may  apply  at  the  Place  to 

SAMUEL  BENSON  LEYDEKKER. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser, 
No.  1311,  February  18,  1768. 

To  be  LETT,  for  two  Years,  from  the  Twenty-fifth  of 
March  next, 

A  QUANTITY  of  good  drained  Meadow,  at  Clommell 
Creek,  in  Gloucester  County,  about  seven  Miles  from  Will- 
iam Cooper's  Ferry,  fit  for  mowing  or  feeding  of  Cattle, 
being  mostly  in  a  good  Sward  of  Grass;  together  with 
some  Upland  adjacent,  suitable  for  Plowing,  or  raising 
Corn,  and  foddering  Cattle  thereon,  in  the  Winter  Season. 
The  Meadows  are  in  good  Banks,  containing  about  300 
Acres,  with  Timber  for  Rails  and  Firewood.  Likewise 
an  Overseer,  who  has  lived  on  the  Place  for  some  Years 
past  with  his  Family,  and  for  his  Conduct  can  be  well  rec- 
ommended. An  Agreement  is  made  with  him  for  one 
Year  certain.  For  Terms,  apply  to  JOSEPH  MORGAN,  at 
Pensawkin,  in  West  New- Jersey;  or  to  CHARLES  WEST, 
near  Vine-street,  Philadelphia. 

WILL  be  exposed  for  Sale,  by  public  Vendue.  on  Third 
Day,  the  22d  of  March  next  ensuing,  at  Clommell  Mead- 
ows, in  Gloucester  County,  about  17  Miles  below  William 
Cooper's  Ferry,  for  ready  Money,  109  steers,  in  good  Or- 
der ;  and  1 22  Ewes  and  Lambs  with  them ;  a  Quantity  of 
Hay;  sundry  Houshold  Goods;  several  Horses;  a  Wag- 
gon; Carts,  and  other  Utensils,  suitable  for  Farming; 
where  Attendance  will  be  given,  at  the  Day  of  Sale,  by 
the  Subscriber. 

All  Persons  who  are  indebted  to  the  Estate  of  ISAAC 
COOPER,  late  of  Newton,  in  the  County  of  Gloucester, 
West  New-Jersey,  deceased,  either  by  Bond,  Note  or  Book 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  5  l 

Debt,  are  desired  to  come  and  discharge  the  same :  And 
those  who  have  any  Demands  against  the  said  Estate,  to 
bring  in  their  Accounts,  that  they  may  be  properly  ad- 
justed by 

SAMUEL  NOBLE,  Executor. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2043,  February  18. 
1768. 

On  the  same  day  [26th  of  last  month]  arrived  the  brig 
Phoenix,  Capt.  Watt,  in  42  days'  from  Kingston,  Jam- 
aica :  .  .  .  .  And  on  the  8th  inst.  about  noon,  15  or  16 
leagues  to  the  southward  of  our  Capes,  he  fell  in  with  the 
brig  John  and  Richard,  Capt.  Collins,  out  16  weeks  from 
Liverpool,  bound  for  this  port,  with  whom  he  kept  com- 
pany till  evening,  when  they  saw  the  Cape,  but  it  coming 
on  very  thick  Capt.  Watt  stood  off,  but  Capt.  Collins  after 
making  two  attempts  to  do  the  same,  not  being  able  to 
put  his  vessel  about,  stood  in  for  the  land,  after  which 
Captain  Watt  saw  no  more  of  him. 

Several  vessels  arrived  here  last  week,  saw  a  brig  ashore 
about  twenty  miles  to  the  southward  of  our  Capes,  which 
is  supposed  to  be  the  brig  John  and  Richard,  Capt.  Collins, 
from  Liverpool  for  this  port,  who  was  spoke  with  on  the 
coast  as  above. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1315, 
February  18,  1768. 

New-York,  February  20.  By  a  Man  from  Shrewsbury, 
we  are  informed,  that  last  Week,  a  Man  of  that  Place,  was 
killed  and  torn  to  Pieces  by  a  Panther;  that  about  an 
Hour  after,  two  Men,  knowing  nothing  of  the  Matter, 
went  with  their  Guns  into  the  same  Wood,  when  the  Beast 
leaped  from  the  Branch  of  a  Tree  where  he  sat  unseen, 
upon  the  Back  of  one  of  the  Men,  where  the  other  Man 
immediately  shot  and  killed  him. 


52  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l7^8 

They  afterwards  found  the  mangled  Body  of  the  dead 
Man,  near  the  Place. 

The  same  Week  two  Men  of  that  Place,  Mr.  Cook  and 
his  Son,  who  had  gone  from  home  with  their  Guns,  and 
had  been  missing  five  Days,  were  found  drown'd,  near  the 
Shore,  in  Water  not  more  than  Knee  deep.  Each  of  them 
had  a  Bruise  on  the  Forehead,  over  one  of  the  Eyes,  but 
whether  by  Accident  or  Design,  or  for  what  Reason  they 
went  into  the  Water  (having  no  Vessel  with  them)  was 
not  known. 

The  same  Week,  a  Barn  in  that  Place,  by  a  Person's 
going  into  it  with  a  Candle,  was  accidentally  set  on  Fire 
and  entirely  consumed,  with  all  it  contained,  being  full  of 
Wheat  and  Flax.  A  like  Accident  happened  there  a  few 
Weeks  ago,  when  a  Barn,  with  500  Bushels  of  Corn  was 
burnt. 

From  Middletown,  in  the  Jersies,  we  hear,  that  the  same 
Week,  a  Alan  hearing  another  had  said  something  to  his 
Disadvantage,  went  to  his  House  seemingly  with  a  Design 
to  Quarrel,  and  after  using  some  abusive  Expressions, 
told  the  Man's  Wife  she  was  a  damn'd  Lyar,  on  \vhich  the 
Husband  being  provoked,  snatched  down  a  Gun  and  struck 
him  with  it  on  the  Head;  he  immediately  went  away, 
swearing  Revenge.  Another  Man  who  happened  to  be 
there  went  with  him,  as  they  went  he  complained  of  his 
Head,  and  concluded  to  go  to  a  Neighbour's  House  hard 
by,  where  he  also  complained  of  his  Head,  applied  some- 
thing to  it,  and  lay  down,  but  soon  after  grew  delirious 
and  died.  The  Man  who  gave  him  the  Stroke  surrendered 
himself,  and  is  in  Gaol,  his  Family  much  distressed.  The 
Coroner's  Inquest  brought  in  their  Verdict,  Accidental 
Death. — Supplement  to  the  Nezv  York  Journal  or  General 
Advertiser,  No.  1311,  February  20,  1768. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  53 

To  be  sold  at  publick  vendue,  on  the  premises,  on  the  I2th 

day  of  April  next. 

THE  equal  one  half  of  the  house  and  lot  of  ground,  (or 
the  'whole )  formerly  belonging  to  Hezekiah  Johnson,  de- 
ceased, situate  about  two  miles  from  Newark,  on  the  main 
road  that  leads  to  Elizabeth-Town.  The  lot  contains  nine 
acres  of  land,  a  house  two  stories  high,  with  4  rooms  on 
a  floor,  a  good  orchard,  and  is  a  good  situation  for  a  tav- 
ern or  store,  there  being  a  publick  landing  at  the  rear  of 
said  lot.  The  conditions  will  be  made  known  on  the  day 
of  sale,  and  an  indisputable  title  given,  by 

MOSES  SCOTT. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
851,  February  22,  1768. 

Springfield,  February  25,  1768. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Springfield 
Township,  Burlington  County,  and  province  of  West 
New- Jersey,  on  the  24th  of  this  inst.  an  English  servant 
man,  named  JOSEPH  MAYALL;  he  is  about  22  years  of 
age,  of  a  fair  complexion;  has  light  straight  hair,  and 
white  eyes :  Had  on,  and  took  with  him,  a  wool  hat,  one 
snuff-coloured  coat,  and  a  black  broadcloth  waistcoat,  an 
old  jacket  with  new  sleeves,  one  striped  flannel  shirt,  and 
two  white  ditto;  a  pair  of  good  leather  breaches,  two  pair 
of  woollen  stockings,  and  two  pair  of  shoes ;  he  also  took 

with  him  a  white  mare,  about  thirteen  hands  high. 

Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  him  and  the  mare,  shall 
have  FOUR  POUNDS  reward,  and  for  the  mare  only, 
TWENTY  SHILLINGS,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by  me 

JOB  STOCKTON. 

Burlington,  Feb.  23,  1768. 
Some  time  the  beginning  of  February,  1768.  was  left 


54  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

at  the  house  of  the  Subscriber,  in  the  city  of  Burlington, 
by  a  person  unknown,  a  black  trunk,  with  sundry  things 
in  it,  as  is  supposed,  being  very  heavy.  And  also,  some 
time  last  summer,  was  left  at  the  said  house  a  man's  light 
coloured  cloth  cloak.  The  persons,  who  left  the  above 
things,  by  applying  to  me,  proving  their  property,  and 
paying  cost,  may  have  them  again. 

JOSEPH  HAIGHT. 

To  BE  SOLD 

A  Bank  House  and  Lot  of  Ground,  about  fourteen  Feet 
Front,  and  thirty  Feet  eight  Inches  deep,  from  Front- 
Street  to  Water-street,  situate  between  Chestnut  and  Wal- 
nut Streets,  in  the  City  of  Philadelphia,  now  in  the  Ten- 
ure of  Benjamin  Condy To  know  the  Terms  of  Sale, 

apply  to  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Greenwich,  in  Cumber- 
land County,  West  New-Jersey,  or  to  Isaac  Stretch,  in 
Philadelphia. 

Feb.  25,  1768.  BENJAMIN  REEVE. 

To  BE  SOLD,  at  public  sale,  by  the  subscriber,  to  the  high- 
est bidder,  on  Monday  the  twenty-first  day  of  March 
next,  at  12  o'clock, 

A  very  valuable  farm,  situate  on  the  river  Delaware,  in 
the  county  of  Hunterdon,  and  province  of  New- Jersey, 
containing  three  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land,  one  hun- 
dred and  seventy  of  which  are  cleared  and  in  good  fence, 
the  remaining  part  well  timbered,  the  whole  tract  is  excel  • 
lent  good  land  for  wheat,  Indian  corn,  and  grass.  There 
are  on  said  farm,  a  good  stone  house  and  kitchen,  a  good 
barn  and  waggon  house,  also,  a  very  fine  young  orchard ; 
it  is  situate  about  thirty  miles  from  Philadelphia,  eighteen 
from  Trenton,  three  from  Correll's  Ferry,  and  about  two 
or  three  miles  from  several  grist  mills.  The  conditions 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  55 

will  be  made  known  on  the  day  of  sale,  and  attendance 
given  by  JOHN  IMLAY. 

Bordentown,  Feb.  24,  1768. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  Public  V endue,  on  the  premises,  on  the 
2 ist  day  of  March  next, 

A  lot  of  land,  containing  about  thirty  acres,  in  West- 
New-Jersey,  in  Burlington  county,  and  within  about  half 
a  mile  of  Bordentown,  and  formerly  known  by  the  name 
of  Black  Creek  Forge.  There  are  on  the  premises  two 
dwelling  houses,  several  out-houses,  a  bearing  orchard, 
and  a  good  saw-mill,  with  two  saws,  on  a  good  stream  of 
water,  where  logs  are  rafted  to  the  mill  tail,  and  the  stuff 
transported  from  thence  to  Philadelphia,  either  by  boats 
or  rafts.  It  is  in  a  good  part  of  the  country  for  a  fulling 
or  grist  mill,  and  has  ^vater  sufficient  for  both.  It  is,  also, 
in  a  plentiful  part  of  the  country  for  wheat.  Two  thirds 
belonging  to  the  estate  of  Joseph  Curtis,  deceased,  and  the 
other  third  to  Aaron  Watson.  The  ivhole  will  be  exposed 
to  sale,  together  with  a  team  of  horses,  and  carriages  suit- 
able to  carry  on  the  saw  mill,  by  MARMADUKE  WATSON, 
ANNE  CURTIS,  and  AARON  WATSON,  Executors. 

N.  B.    An  indisputable  title  will  be  given. 

Feb.  22,  1768. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  59,  February  22- 
29,  1768. 

TO   THE   PUBLIC. 

As  I  find  myself  Chronicled,  after  a  very  slanderous 
manner,  in  Mr.  Goddard's  Paper,  No.  '57,  by  Arthur  Don- 
aldson, (formerly  of  Southzvark,  now  tending  a  Ferry  at 
Point  Pleasant,  West  New  Jersey)  who  says,  he  "takes 
that  method  to  justify  himself  against  an  unjust  account 
contained  in  my  books,  that  I  for  several  years  past,  have 


56  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

refused  to  comply  with  justice  for  the  settlement  of  the 
same,  though  frequently  pressed  thereto;"  I  am  under  a 
necessity  of  clearing  my  character  from  such  aspersions, 
and  doubt  not  that  the  base  insinuations  couched  under 
them,  will  evidently  appear  to  the  world,  to  proceed  from 

malice  and  ill  nature 

[signed]     WILLIAM  DREWRY. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1316,  February  25, 
1768. 

WHEREAS  RICHARD  BROWN,  and  others  of  the  inhabi- 
tants of  the  county  of  Monmouth,  did  send  in  a  petition  to 
the  House  of  Assembly,  at  a  sessions  held  in  Burlington, 
June  1767,  respecting  the  duty  of  maintaining  a  bridge 
over  Crosswick  Creek,  in  the  county  aforesaid.  Ordered 
by  the  said  house,  that  Richard  Brown  have  leave  to  bring 
in  a  bill  for  his  relief  in  the  premises,  at  the  next  session, 
if  no  reasonable  objection  appear  against  the  ,same,  of 
which  I  do  hereby  give  public  notice,  by  order  of  the  said 
house 

RICHARD  BROWN. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2044,  February  25, 
1768. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Farm,   situate  in  the  Township 
of   Bedminster,   county   of   Somerset, 
and  province  of  New-Jersey,  lately  the 
property  of  Jeremiah  Bright,  contain- 
ing 210  acres,  70  or  80  acres  of  which 
is  cleared  fit  for  tillage,  20  or  30  acres 
of  improved  meadow,   and   as  many 
more  may  be  made;  the  remainder  of  the  land  is  well  tim- 
bered;  on  the  farm  is  a  good  stone  house  two  stories;    a 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  57 

barn,  and  other  ont-houses,  a  bearing  orchard  of  about  1 50 
apple-trees,  the  whole  in  good  fence,  and  a  fine  lively 
stream  running  through  the  same.  Inquire  of  Doctor 
Lewis  Johnston,  John  Barberie,  Stephen  Skinner,  or  John 
Johnston,  at  Perth-Amboy,  who  will  give  easy  payments, 
and  an  indisputable  title  for  the  same,  good  bonds  will  be 
taken  in  payment. 

Perth-Amboy,  Feb.  18,  1768. 

Perth-Amboy,  Feb.  10,  1768. 
To  be  sold,  at  public  Vendue,  on  Thursday, 
the  3  ist  Day  of  March, 

THE   plantation    of   John    Gordon, 
situate    in    Cranbury,    in    Middlesex 
county,    east    New-Jersey,   containing 
about  200  acres,  whereon  is  a  house, 
barn,    orchard,    and    other    improve- 
ments, conveniently  situated  to  mills 
and  places  of  worship,  and  about  five 
miles  from  Spotswood.     The  vendue  to  be  held  on  the 
premises;    one  third  of  the  purchase  money  being  paid 
down,  good  security  will  be  taken  for  the  remainder,  pay- 
ing interest.    For  further  particulars  apply  to  JOHN  BAR- 
BERIE, at  Perth-Amboy,  who  has  power  to  sell. 

N.  B.  He  has  also  a  negro  girl  of  14  years  of  age  to 
sell,  fit  for  the  country. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  the  stated  Meetings  of  the 
General  Proprietors  of  the  Eastern  Division  of  New-Jer- 
sey, are  held  at  Perth-Amboy,  on  the  2d  Tuesday  in  April 
and  2d  Tuesday  in  September. 

JAMES  PARKER.1 

Perth-Amboy,  Feb.  22,  1768. 

i  For  a  sketch  of  James  Parker,   see   N.   J.   Archives,   Second   Series, 
I.,  454. 


58  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

BY  virtue  of  sundry  executions  to  us  the  subscribers 
directed,  against  the  goods  and  chattels,  lands  and  tene- 
ments of  William  Van  Kirk,  and  pursuant  thereto,  we 
have  seized  a  certain  tract  of  land  and  tenement,  belong- 
ing to  the  said  William  Van  Kirk,  situated  in  Freehold, 
containing  about  three  hundred  acres  of  good  wheat-land, 
well  water'd  and  timbered,  about  twenty  acres  of  meadow ; 
great  part  well  improv'd,  a  bearing  orchard,  consisting  of 
about  five  hundred  trees  of  the  best  fruit;  a  good  house 
and  barn,  and  waggon-house,  and  other  out-houses;  and 
is  nigh  by  a  grist-mill,  and  about  five  miles  from  the  court- 
house. Now  this  is  to  give  notice,  that  the  aforesaid  lands 
and  tenements,  so  taken,  will  be  exposed  to  sale,  by  way  of 
public  vendue,  on  Saturday  the  ninth  day  of  April,  on  the 
premises,  between  the  hours  of  twelve  and  five  in  the  after- 
noon of  the  same  day,  by 

JOHN  TAYLOR,  late  Sheriff.    . 

THOMAS  LEONARD,  Sheriff. 
February  5,  1768. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Farm,  containing  about  220  acres,  situate  at  Match- 
aponix,  in  the  county  of  Middlesex  and  province  of  New- 
Jersey,  eleven  miles  from  Amboy  and  New-Brunswick, 
and  four  from  South-  River  landing,  in  the  neighbourhood 
of  two  iron-works,  and  two  grist-mills,  where  is  a  good 
market  for  all  kind  of  produce,  has  the  valuable  advantage 
of  a  large  out-let  for  cattle  and  swine.  There  is  on  the 
farm,  a  small  house,  Dutch  barn,  Blacksmith's  shop,  and 
a  young  bearing  orchard ;  about  30  acres  cleared  land,  the 
remainder  good  land,  well  timbered,  30  or  40  acres  of  good 
swamp  meadow  may  be  made  with  little  expence.  The 
farm  is  well  watered,  will  suit  a  farmer  or  tradesman,  be- 
ing in  a  neighbourhood  of  wealthy  farmers.  Inquire  of 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  59 

John  Johnston,  at  Amboy,  or  Thomas  Newton,  on  the 
premises. 

Matchaponix,  Feb.  20,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1312,  February  25,  1768. 

To  BE  LET, 

[And  may  be  entered  upon  immediately] 
A  FARM  or  PLANTATION,  in  the  township  of  Newtown, 
county  of  Sussex,  and  eastern  division  of  the  province  of 
New-Jersey;  containing  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres, 
one  hundred  acres  thereof  meadow,  the  residue  arable 
land  and  woods,  of  the  latter,  about  eighty  or  ninety  acres : 
The  tract  is  bounded  upon,  and  in  some  places  includes, 
part  of  three  ponds,  one  of  which  is  nearly  three  miles 
long,  and  is  the  head  of  Pequess,  which  empties  into  Del- 
aware; great  plenty  of  fish  may  be  caught  at  any  season 

of  the  year between  one  of  the  ponds  and  the  house, 

is  a  young  bearing  orchard,  of  near  two  hundred  apple 
trees,  producing  sufficient  fruit  for  the  use  of  the  farm; 
on  that  pond  is  a  small  boat,  neatly  painted,  and  furnished 
with  oars,  &c.  wild  fowl  and  venison  abound  in  their  sea- 
son, and  it  is  to  be  remarked,  that  neither  of  those  waters 
are  stagnated,  but  flow  transparently  from  sandy  shores 
(through  channels  cut  for  that  purpose)  into  the  river 

Pequess  aforesaid There  are  on  the  premises  a  small, 

but  comfortable,  log  house,  barn,  barrackr  paled  garden, 
and  a  spring  at  the  door;  the  upland  and  meadows  in  tol- 
erable good  fence,  and  some  very  excellent  meadow  may 

yet  be  made. This  plantation  lies  on  the  main  road  to 

Goshen,  distant  about  two  miles  from  Andover  Furnace, 
and  three  from  the  court-house,  commands  an  out-let,  or 
range  of  several  thousand  acres,  of  which  (from  particu- 
lar circumstances)  it  never  can  be  deprived;  its  contiguity 


6O  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

to  the  two  last-mentioned  places,  is  exceedingly  advan- 
tageous, as  every  thing  that  can  be  raised  upon  it,  has  an 
immediate  sale,  for  the  supply  of  one  or  other  of  them. 

There  is  a  crop  in  the  ground,  which  should  be  early 

attended  to;  the  tenant  may  be  supplied  with  about  thirty 
head  of  cattle,  ten  of  them  cows,  (mostly  with  calf)  about 
twenty  sheep;  from  two  to  six  horses;  and  two  negro 
men,  that  understand  farming :  For  any  other  particulars 
or  information,  apply  in  New-Brunswick,  in  New-Jersey, 
to  the  owner, 

CORNELIUS  Low,  jun. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  60,  February  29- 
March  7,  1767. 

To  be  LET,  at  Newark,  in  the  Jersies, 
A  House,  neatly  finished,  with  a  BARN  and  ORCHARD, 
(or  only  the  House  and  Garden)   on  the  first  of  April 
next,  by  Stephen  Baldwin,  and  Thomas  Brown. 

To  be  SOLD,  or  LET,  by  the  subscriber, 
A  New  well  situated  house,  in  Elizabeth-Town-Raway, 
with  four  rooms  on  the  lower  floor,  and  two  fire-places, 
and  one  above  stairs;  is  neatly  finished,  has  a  dry  cellar 
under  it,  and  a  well  of  good  water  near  the  door;  also  a 
new  barn,  chair-house,  garden,  and  a  young  orchard  of 
apple  and  pear  trees,  grafted  with  the  choicest  fruits  in 
those  parts;  a  peach  orchard,  and  sundry  other  sorts  of 
frUit  trees,  such  as  cherries,  quinces,  and  plumbs.  It 
stands  between  the  two  branches  of  Raway-River,  and 
bounded  on  the  main  branch,  near  the  post  road;  and  is 
within  a  mile  and  a  half  of  two  publick  landings,  and 
about  the  same  distance  from  a  presbyterian  and  quaker 
meeting  house,  and  two  grist-mills.  The  land  is  exceed- 
ing good,  part  for  tilling  and  part  for  mowing;  and  is 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  6 1 

a  good  situation  for  a  merchant,  tradesman,  or  tavern 
keeper.  It  will  be  sold  or  let,  with  any  quantity  of  land 
not  exceeding  20  acres,  and  a  reasonable  time  allowed  for 
the  payment,  as  ready  money  is  not  wanted;  and  if  any 
person  inclines  to  purchase  or  hire  a  larger,  or  one  not 
so  large  as  the  above  mentioned,  they  may  be  suited  by 
the  subscriber,  in  as  short  a  time  as  the  work  can  be  done, 
as  the  materials  is  now  ready  to  be  put  together,  and 
building  is  his  trade.  The  above  premises  may  be  taken 
into  possession  six  weeks  after  agreement  is  made;  and 
a  good  title  may  be  had,  by  applying  to  the  subscriber,  on 
the  premises. 

JONATHAN  HIGGENS. 

To  BE  LET, 

THE  house  and  lot  wherein  GEORGE  Ross,  Esq;  lives, 
in  Elizabeth-Town,  an  extreme  pleasant  situation.  Also 
the  house  and  lot  wherein  WILLIAM  GREY,  lives,  adjoin- 
ing the  first  mentioned  lot.  For  further  particulars,  en- 
quire of  Mr.  Woodruff,  jun.  in  Elizabeth-Town,  or  Mr. 
Kelly,  in  New  York. 

To  BE  LET, 

A  House  and  large  garden,  at  New- 
Brunswick,  the  property  of  Dr.  Mer- 
cer,   and    now    in    the   possession    of 
William  Donaldson;    it  is  very  pleas- 
antly situated  upon  the  bank  of  the 
river;   has  three  good  fine  rooms  upon 
the  first  floor,  and  four  rooms  on  the 
second,   with  a  good  kitchen,   cellar, 
pantry,  &c.  below,  and  a  large  barn,  with  very  convenient 
stabling  in  it,  and  other  out  houses.    Also  two  large  con- 
venient store  houses  adjoining;    the  possession  to  be  en- 


62  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

ter'd  upon  the  first  of  May.  For  further  particulars,  en- 
quire of  Doctor  Mercer,  at  New-Brunswick,  or  Archibald 
Mercer,  at  Walter  and  Samuel  Franklin's  store,  in  New- 
York. 

WANTED. 

A  Person  that  understands  the  nailing  business  in  its 
different  branches,  or  has  been  employed  in  that  manu- 
factory. Such  a  person  bringing  proper  recommendations, 
will  meet  with  good  encouragement,  by  applying  to  Joseph 
Riggs,  Esq;  or  Joseph  Hadden,  in  Newark,  New-Jersey, 
who  are  entring  largely  into  that  business. 

THREE  POUNDS  REWARD. 

RuN-away  about  the  6th  of  January  last,  an  indented 
servant  man  named  Siles  Palmer,  born  in  New-England, 
and  is  supposed  to  have  gone  that  way  or  towards  the 
Nine- Partners ;  he  is  about  25  years  old,  5  feet  6  or  7 
inches  high,  light  hair,  blue  eyes,  adicted  to  drinking,  and 
when  in  liquor,  talkative  and  impertinent :  Had  on  when 
he  went  away,  a  small  bound  felt  hat,  leather  breeches, 
and  a  blue  jacket,  but  it  is  likely  he  may  change  his  dress. 
Whoever  takes  up  said  servant,  and  commits  him  to  any 
of  his  Majesty's  goals,  shall  have  the  above  reward,  by 
applying  to  the  subscriber,  living  in  Morris-Town,  East 
New-Jersey. 

MARY  MOORE. 

To  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Monday  the  2d  of  May 

next  in  the  county  of  Morris,  and  town  of  Pequanick ; 

AN  excellent  tavern,  and  farm,  which  contains  50  acres 

of  excellent  good  land,  whereof  is  cut  18  or  20  tuns  of 

good  English  hay,  yearly,  and  more  may  be  cut  with  little 

expence;    there  is  on  said  farm  150  young  bearing  apple 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  63 

trees,  a  good  dwelling  house,  new  barn,  barrack,  out- 
house, &c.  the  land  is  well  watered,  and  pleasantly  situated 
for  a  tavern,  merchant,  or  tradesman,  as  there  is  a  num- 
ber of  forges,  furnaces,  &c.  at  proper  distances,  to  make 
the  place  exceeding  profitable.  There  will  also  be  sold  at 
the  same  time,  by  the  subscriber,  26  or  27  acres  of  excel- 
lent marsh  swamp.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase 
either  the  swamp,  or  farm,  at  private  sale,  will  have  good 
times  of  payment  given,  and  an  excellent  title. 

LEWIS  STEWART. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
852,  February  29,  1768. 

New-York,  March  3.  We  hear  from  Morris  County 
in  New- Jersey,  that  about  ten  Days  ago  one  William 
Thorpe,  of  that  County,  having  been  assisting  to  bring 
some  Persons  to  Justice,  for  Breach  of  the  Laws,  they 
were  so  enraged  at  him,  that  they  threatened  Vengeance 
against  him;  of  which  the  Justice  getting  Intelligence,  he 
sent  his  Son  to  Thorpe  to  give  him  Notice:  While  the 
young  Man  was  at  Thorpe's  House,  the  People  came 
there  to  execute  their  Purpose,  whereupon  Thorpe  got 
up  Stairs  in  his  Chamber  with  his  Gun,  and  the  others 
attempting  to  pursue  him;  he  told  them  that  it  would  be 
at  their  Peril  to  advance;  but  they  disregarding  that, 
pushed  forward,  whereupon  he  fired,  and  shot  one  dead 
upon  the  Spot;  and  with  his  Gun  and  the  Assistance  of 
the  Justice's  Son,  beat  off  the  rest:  Thorpe  then  went 
and  surrendered  himself  up  to  Justice.  We  have  not  learnt 
the  Name  of  the  Person  killed. 

New-Jersey,  Middlesex  County,  January  i8th,  1768. 
BY  Virtue  of  several  Writs  of  Fieri  Facias  to  me  di- 
rected, will  be  exposed  to  public  Sale,  on  Monday  the 


64  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

2ith  Day  of  March  next,  at  one  o' Clock  in  the  Afternoon, 
at  the  House  of  the  Widow  Lot,  in  South-Amboy.  A 
Tract  of  Wood  Land,  situate  in  South-Amboy,  between 
Tenant's  Creek  and  Day's  Run;  containing  by  Estima- 
tion Three  Hundred  Acres,  late  the  Property  of  Thomas 
Leonard,  deceased,  seized  and  taken  in  Execution,  at  the 
Suit  of  Thomas  Watson,  and  others,  by 

JAMES  BROOKS,  late  Sheriff. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1313,  March  3,  1768. 

RuN-away  from  the  subscriber,  on 
Wednesday  the  24th  February  1768, 
living  in  Middleton,  Monmouth  Coun- 


MAN 

RUNNING 
AWAY 


ty,  East  New- Jersey,  a  Negro  fellow 
named  Lank,  about  five  feet  eight  or 
nine  inches  high,  slender  made,  about 
twenty-five  years  of  age;  had  on  a 
light  coloured  homespun  coat,  an  old  hat,  a  grey  homespun 
jacket,  blue  cloth  breeches,  and  yarn  stockings  :  Any  per- 
son who  takes  up  said  run-away,  and  brings  him  to  me, 
shall  have  twenty  shillings  reward,  and  all  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by 

WILLIAM  HENDRICKS. 

To  be  sold,  by  public  Vendue,  on  the  7th  Day  of  the 
Week,  between  the  Hours  of  Two  and  Five  in  the  After- 
noon, the  1 9th  Day  of  this  instant  March,  on  the  Premises, 
A  valuable  Plantation,  and  Tract  of  Land,  containing  200 
Acres,  situate  on  the  South-side  of  Timber  Creek  in  the 
County  of  Gloucester,  9  Miles  from  William  Cooper's 
Ferry  by  Land,  and  but  n  Miles  from  Philadelphia  by 
Water,  about  70  Acres  of  Upland  cleared,  fit  for  either 
Rye  or  Indian  corn,  20  Acres  of  mowable  Tide  Meadow, 
and  the  rest  Woodland;  there  is  on  the  Premises  a  Dwell- 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  65 

ing-house,  a  large  Barn,  48  Feet  square,  a  large  Stable, 
Corn  Cribs,  Milk-house,  an  Orchard,  and  a  good  Well  of 
Water,  now  in  the  Tenure  of  Thomas  Done.  Any  Per- 
son inclining  to  purchase,  may  view  the  Premises,  by  ap- 
plying to  the  Tenant,  who  will  shew  the  same  any  time 
before  the  Day  of  Sale.  The  Purchaser  paying  one  Third 
of  the  Purchase  Money  down,  may  have  Time  for  Pay- 
ment of  the  Remainder,  giving  Security,  and  paying  In- 
terest, and  the  Premises  may  be  entered  on  immediately; 
Part  of  the  real  Estate  late  of  James  West  deceased.  At- 
tendance will  be  given  at  the  Day  of  Sale,  by  DANIEL 
COOPER,  and  CHARLES  WEST,  Executors. 

To  be  LETT,  or  SOLD, 
By  THOMAS  BOND,  of  Philadelphia,  or  WILLIAM  HUGG 

of  Gloucester. 

A  VALUABLE  PLANTATION,  on  Racoon  Creek,  in  West- 
Jersey,  containing  188  Acres  of  good  Land,  on  which  are 
two  Dwelling-houses,  a  Barn,  and  large  Orchard. 

WHEREAS  I  Gamaliel  Garrison,  of  Alloway's  Creek 
Precinct,  in  the  County  of  Salem,  New- Jersey,  Brick- 
layer, did,  about  three  Years  ago,  enter  into  two  Bonds  or 
Obligations;  one  conditioned  for  the  Payment  of  70  1. 
with  Interest;  and  the  other  conditioned  for  the  Payment 
of  60  1.  with  Interest,  unto  a  certain  John  Drummond,  on 
certain  Days  therein  mentioned  and  long  since  past;  and 
whereas  the  same  Bonds  were  given  in  Payment  for  a 
Tract  of  Land  sold  by  the  said  John  Drummond  to  me, 
and  as  the  said  John  Drummond  hath  not  made  me  a  Title 
to  the  same  Land,  I  hereby  forewarn  all  Persons  from 
taking  an  Assignment  of  said  Bonds,  or  either  of  them, 
as  I  intend  not  to  pay  the  same,  unless  the  said  Drummond 
makes  me  a  clear  Title,  pursuant  to  our  Agreement. 

GAMALIEL  GARRISON. 


66  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

WHEREAS  George  Smith,  on  the  I4th  of  February  last, 
absconded,  and  stole  from  John  Tindall,  two  new  home- 
spun shirts,  and  other  things,  not  yet  known;  he  is  very 
remarkable  in  being  very  fluent  with  his  tongue,  that  is 
the  English  tongue,  and  can  talk  Dutch  very  well,  is  coun- 
try born,  marked  a  little  with  the  small-pox,  long  brown- 
ish hair,  light  coloured  eyes,  loves  liquor,  and  gaming; 
had  on  when  he  went  away,  a  brown  double-breasted 
broadcloth  coat,  with  brass  buttons,  and  patched  in  sev- 
eral places  with  dark  grey  forrest  cloth,  a  brown  broad- 
cloth jacket,  an  old  pair  of  leather  breeches,  blue  and  white 
yarn  stockings,  and  a  strong  pair  of  shoes,  with  large  brass 
buckles.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Smith  and  secures  him 
in  any  of  his  Majesty's  goals,  and  gives  notice  thereof  to 
the  subscriber,  so  as  he  may  have  him,  shall  receive  THREE 
POUNDS  reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by  JOHN 
TINDALL,  living  in  Windsor  township,  Middlesex  county. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  on  Monday,  the 
28th  day  of  March  instant,  on  the  premises,  the  following 
lots  of  land,  viz.  One  lot,  containing  about  4  acres,  on 
which  is  a  very  large  dwelling-house,  a  large  stable,  with 
a  hay  loft  over  it;  also  a  very  good  shed  for  horses,  30 
feet  long,  with  other  conveniences,  suitable  for  a  tavern, 
where  there  has  been  one  kept  for  many  years.  Also  one 
other  lot,  lying  within  a  quarter  of  a  mile  of  said  house, 
containing  20  acres  of  cleared  land,  on  which  is  a  very 
good  bearing  orchard  of  good  fruit.  Likewise  60  acres 
of  woodland,  within  about  one  mile  of  said  house,  re- 
markably well  timbered ;  part  of  which  land  is  rich  swamp, 
and,  with  a  small  expence,  may  be  made  good  meadow. 
All  of  said  lots  of  land  are  situate  in  and  near  Allen's 
town,  Monmouth  county,  New- Jersey.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase  all  said  lots  together,  or  either  of  them. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  67 

before  the  day  of  sale,  may  be  informed  of  the  conditions, 

by  applying  to  GUISBERT  GIBERSON,  or  SAMUEL  PARENT, 

in  the  township  of  Upper  Freehold,  and  county  aforesaid. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2045,  March  3,  1768. 

AT  Etna  Furnace,  in  the  County  of  Burlington,  good 
Colliers,  two  good  Carpenters,  a  good  Smith  that  under- 
stands the  making  flatt  or  padd1  iron  handles,  a  Stone  Cut- 
ter, a  person  used  to  grind  flatt  irons  and  waggon  boxes, 
will  meet  with  encouragement. — The  Pennsylvania  Jour- 
nal, No.  1317,  March  3,  1768. 

To  be  sold  at  VENDUE,  on  Thursday  the  3ist  Day  of 

March,  Inst.  at  two  o'clock  P.  M. 
FIFTY  two  acres  of  land,  situate  in  Hanover,  in  the 
county  of  Morris,  adjoining  the  Land  of  Matthias  Burnet, 
Benjamin  Coe,  and  on  the  land  formerly  belonging  to 
Caleb  Ball,  deceased,  and  by  Abraham  Casterlin,  Samuel 
Ford,  and  Jonathan  Johnson,  being  good  for  meadow  and 
tillage,  with  a  saw-mill  thereon,  standing  on  Whipening 
river,  called  or  known  by  the  name  of  Connor's  saw-mill. 
The  above  land  belonged  to  Timothy  Connor,  Fuller,  late 
of  Hanover,  deceased.  The  vendue  to  be  held  on  the 
premises,  by 

MATTHEW  LUM, 
JOSEPH  WOOD. 
Auditors 

To  be  sold,  a  plantation,  lying  and  being  in  Middletown, 
county  of  Monmouth  and  province  of  East  New- Jersey, 
containing  two  or  three  hundred  acres  of  land,  (or  any 
number  more  or  less,  as  may  suit  the  purchaser,)  situate 
within  one  mile  and  an  half  of  Middletown-Point,  and 
two  miles  of  Chinquerora  Bay;  where  is  plenty  of  fish- 

i?sad. 


68  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

ing,  oystering,  and  claming,  and  within  one  mile  of  a 
grist-mill,  and  half  a  mile  of  a  saw-mill.  There  is  on  said 
plantation  a  tolerable  good  dwelling-house,  bearing  orch- 
ard, and  about  sixty  acres  of  up-land  and  meadow  cleared, 
and  much  more  may  be  made;  the  woodland  well  tim- 
bered, and  the  whole  well  water'd  and  in  good  fence,  an 
indisputable  title  will  be  given  for  the  same  by  the  sub- 
scriber living  near  the  premises. 

JAMES  KEARNEY 

To  be  sold,  at  Hanover,  in  the  County  of  Morris,  and 
Province  of  East  New- Jersey; 

THE     Plantation     whereon     Peter 
Smith,1  now  lives:     It  contains  360 
Acres  of  excellent  Land,  well  wooded 
and  watered;    and  as  much  Meadow 
as  will  yield  80  Loads  of  Hay  yearly, 
and  much  more  may  be  made,  the  Rest 
all  good  Wood  and  Plow-land.    There 
is  on  said  Plantation  two  Dwelling- 
Houses,  one  of  which  almost  new,  and  the  other  pretty 
tolerable,  with  a  good  Barn,  and  two  excellent  Orchards 
of  the  best  Fruit.    It  lies  in  a  well  settled  Part  of  the  Coun- 
try, and  within  13  Miles  of  Newark.     Whoever  may  in- 
cline to  purchase  the  same,  may  apply  to  the  subscriber  on 
the  Premises. 

PETER  SMITH. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
853,  March  7,  1768. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  way  of  public  VENDUE,  on  the  Prem- 
ises, on  the  4th  Day  of  April  next. 
A  VALUABLE  plantation,  in  Deptford  township,  Glou- 


i  Peter  Smith  died  January  16,  1771,  in  his  61st  year,  and  is  buried  at 
Hanover. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  69 

cester  county,  New- Jersey,  being  the  property  of  Luke 
Gibson,  late  deceased,  containing  287  acres,  more  or  less, 
of  which  there  are  near  20  acres  good  meadow,  well 
watered,  the  upland  naturally  good,  100  acres,  or  near  it, 
cleared,  and  good  for  grass  as  well  as  grain,  an  apple 
orchard,  and  a  well  of  good  water  at  the  door.  Also  a 
tract  of  land  or  plantation,  containing  184  acres,  on  which 
there  is  a  grist-mill  that  now  goes,  grinds  well,  and  sup- 
plied by  a  constant  stream  of  water;  about  40  acres  of 
upland  cleared,  and  six  acres  of  swamp  that,  when  im- 
proved, will  make  good  meadow.  Likewise  two  tracts 
of  woodland,  one  containing  117  acres,  the  other  77  acres, 
all  adjoining,  and  very  convenient  for  one  person  to  pur- 
chase, if  so  disposed;  situate  about  12  miles  from  Phil- 
adelphia, and  one  and  a  half  from  a  landing.  For  infor- 
mation respecting  the  title,  enquire  of  the  subscribers, 
who  live  near  the  premises. 

JAMES  COOPER,   JOSHUA  LORD. 

Freehold,  Monmouth  County,  East  New-Jersey, 

Jan  25,  1768. 

WHEREAS  ELEANOR,  Wife  of  the  Subscriber,  hath  eloped 
from  him,  and  run  him  considerably  in  Debt,  besides  pil- 
fering from  him  a  valuable  Sum  of  Money,  and  sundry 
Effects  of  Value,  and  continues  to  strole  about  the  Coun- 
try, with  a  certain  red  haired  Highland  Tinker,  who  calls 
himself  John  M/Donall  (who  it  is  probable  was  an  accom- 
plice in  the  aforesaid  base  Conduct)  and  passes  for  his 
Wife;  and  as  he  has  Reason  to  fear  she  will  run  him  yet 
farther  in  Debt,  takes  this  Method  of  requesting  all  Per- 
sons, not  to  trust  her  on  his  Account,  for  he  will  pay  no 
Debts  of  her  contracting,  after  the  Date  hereof. 

WILLIAM  ORCHARD. 


7O  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  public  VENDUE,  on  the  Premises  on  the 

26th  Day  of  this  Instant  March. 

A  PLANTATION,  or  tract  of  land,  containing  no  acres, 
more  or  less,  situate  and  lying  in  the  township  of  Piles- 
grove,  and  county  of  Salem,  West  New-Jersey;  the  land 
is  very  good,  with  a  parcel  of  exceeding  good  meadow, 
there  is  a  dwelling  house  on  the  same  with  a  small  orch- 
ard of  apples  and  peaches,  about  30  or  40  acres  of  cleared 
land;  the  whole  well  watered  and  timbered,  within  half 
a  mile  of  a  grist-mill.  The  title  indisputable.  The  condi- 
tions will  be  made  known  on  the  day  of  sale,  and  due  at- 
tendance will  be  given,  by 

JOHN  HOLTON. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2045,  March  10, 
1768. 

THREE  POUNDS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  Chesterfield, 
Burlington  county,  New-Jersey,  last  night,  an  Irish  ser- 
vant man,  named  Francis  Nevil,  about  twenty  years  of 
age,  five  feet  eight  inches  high,  fair  complexion,  straight 
hair,  a  mole  on  his  left  cheek :  Had  on  and  took  with  him, 
a  new  beaver  hat,  a  homespun  light  coloured  great-coat, 
the  under  part  of  the  sleeves  lighter  coloured,  an  old  tight- 
bodied  brown  broadcloth  coat,  lined  with  green,  blue  ever- 
lasting breeches,  flowered  flannel  vest,  double-breasted, 
tied  with  strings,  pale  blue  stockings,  half  worn  shoes : 
He  took  with  him  a  sorrel  horse,  near  fifteen  hands  high, 
about  ten  years  old,  light  main  and  tail,  blaze  down  his 
face,  shod,  a  natural  pacer,  carries  his  head  low.  Whoever 
takes  up  the  said  servant,  and  secures  him,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  the  above  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges  paid  by  me 

SAMUEL  SYKES. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  71 

N.  B.     He  was  advertised  in  the  Pennsylvania  news- 
papers the  24th  of  January  last.1 
March  16,  1768 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  62,  March  14-21, 
1768. 

To  be  sold  by  the  Subscriber,  a  Tract  of  Land,  contain- 
ing several  Hundred  Acres,  situate  in  the  Township  of 
Bedminster,  and  County  of  Somerset,  in  New-Jersey; 
adjoining  the  Mill  and  Lands  late  Andrew  Leak's :  Sev- 
eral very  excellent  Farms  may  be  made  on  the  Tract,  as 
the  Soil  and  Situation  are  inferior  to  none  in  the  Prov- 
ince; Wood,  Water,  and  Meadow,  abounds  in  great  Per- 
fection, and  the  Lands  capable  of  any  Degree  of  Improve- 
ment. One  third  of  the  Principal  to  be  paid  down,  Bonds, 
with  Security,  will  be  taken  for  the  Residue,  and  very 
reasonable  Time  allowed.  Enquire  on  the  Premises,  of 

JOHN  CAREY. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

ONE  or  Two  Hundred  Acres  of  choice  Timber  and 
Wood-Land,  lying  but  5  Miles  from  the  City  of  New- 
Brunswick,  between  the  Post  Road  leading  to  Philadel- 
phia and  George's  Road.  Whoever  inclines  to  purchase, 
may  apply  to  Peter  Farmer,  living  on  the  Premises,  who 
will  give  a  good  Title  for  the  same. — Supplement  to  the 
New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  853,  March 
7,  1768. 

New  York,  March  7.  We  are  assured  the  General  As- 
sembly of  the  Province  of  New- Jersey,  are  to  meet  at 
Perth- Amboy  the  I2th  of  April  next,  to  proceed  on  Busi- 
ness; circular  Letters  having  already  been  sent  to  the 
Members  for  that  Purpose. 

1  See  page  31,  ante. 


/2  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

Springfield,  March  5,  1768. 
To  BE  SOLD, 

By  Way  of  Publick  Vendue,  on  Monday  the  2ist  Day  of 
March,  on  the  Premises. 

A  Plantation,  or  Tract  of  I^and,  situated  at  Springfield, 
in  the  Borough  of  Elisabeth,  and  Province  of  New-Jersey, 
within  half  a  Mile  of  Isaac  Woodruff's,  Esq,  containing 
about  140  Acres,  late  the  Property  of  Daniel  Ball:  On 
the  Premises  there  are  a  Dwelling-House,  Barn,  Saw- 
Mill,  and  about  25  Acres  of  Meadow,  fit  for  the  Scythe, 
with  a  young  Orchard.  The  Terms  of  Sale,  and  the  Title 
to  be  given,  will  be  made  known  at  the  Day  and  Place 
abovesaid,  by 

JONATHAN  J.  DAYTON, 
NATHANIEL  BALL, 
THOMAS  BALL,, 
NATHANIEL  SALMON, 
THOMAS  BAILY. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1315,  March  14,  1768. 

HERMITAGE,1 

Pleasantly  situated  on  the  river  Delaware,  one  mile  from 
Trenton,  in  New-Jersey,  to  be  sold  by  the  subscriber. 
The  farm  contains  220  acres  of  land,  170  whereof  is 
cleared,  between  30  and  40  of  excellent  meadow,  the  re- 
mainder finely  timbered,  an  orchard  of  250  apple  trees  of 
different  kinds,  the  greatest  part  grafted,  a  choice  collec- 
tion of  other  fruits,  as  pears,  plumbs,  peaches,  cherries, 
quinces,  &c.  The  dwelling-house  of  four  handsome 
rooms  on  the  lower  floor,  and  cellars  underneath,  well  fin- 
ished, a  large  kitchen,  two  stories  high,  with  rooms  and 

i  During  the  Revolution  and  many  years  afterward  the  residence  of 
Gen.  Philemon  Dickinson;  now  a  part  of  the  Atterbury  estate.  This 
>roperty  was  advertised  a  few  months  previously.  See  N.  J.  Archives, 

~"r.,  536. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  73 

fire  places  sufficient  for  a  number  of  servants,  a  new  barn 
and  stables,  and  good  garden.  The  plantation  is  extreme- 
ly well  watered,  and  the  soil  very  fertile,  fishing  and  fowl- 
ing in  abundance.  The  situation  commands  a  most  agree- 
able prospect  of  several  miles,  both  up  and  down  the  river, 
and  a  full  view  of  all  vessels  coming  from  Philadelphia, 
or  boats  crossing  the  ferry  at  Trenton  landing,  calculated 
in  every  respect  for  a  gentleman's  seat.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase,  may  know  the  terms,  by  applying  to 
me  on  the  premises, 

BENJAMIN  BILES. 

By  virtue  of  a  writ  of  Fieri  Facias,  to  me  directed,  will 
be  exposed  to  sale,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  to  the  high- 
est bidder,  at  the  house  of  Daniel  Lanning,  in  Trenton 
township,  on  Saturday,  the  ^oth  day  of  April  next,  to  be- 
gin at  i  o'clock  in  the  afternoon,  horses,  cattle,  sheep,  hogs, 
beds  and  bedding,  tables,  chairs,  a  cupboard  and  sundries. 
Also  to  be  sold  the  same  day,  on  the  premises,  between 
the  hours  of  12  and  5  o'clock  in  the  afternoon,  a  certain 
piece  or  tract  of  land  and  plantation,  in  Trenton  aforesaid; 
bounded  east  by  Joseph  and  William  Green,  west  by  Jacob 
Carle,  and  Abial  Davis,  north  by  Stephen  Lanning,  and 
south  by  David  How  ell f  and  David  Holden,  containing  200 
acres,  more  or  less;  late  the  property  of  Daniel  Lanning, 
•seized  and  taken  in  execution  at  the  suit  of  Ebenezer  Cow- 
ell,  executor  of  David  Cowell  deceased,  and  to  be  sold  by 

MICAJAH  How,  Sheriff. 

On  Monday,  the  Fourth  Day  of  April  next,  will  be  sold 
at  public  Vendue,  at  Sussex  Court-house,  in  New  Jersey, 
sundry  Tracts  of  Land,  being  Part  of  the  Estate  of  Rich- 
ard Reading,  viz. 

ONE  undivided  sixth  Part  of  616  Acres  of  Land,  sit- 


74  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

uate  on  Scott's  Mountain,  in  the  Township  of  Oxford, 
and  County  of  Sussex,  to  the  Southeast  of  the  Vanetta's 
Farms,  adjoining  the  southerly  Side  of  Lands  surveyed 
to  Thomas  Boulsby. 

Also  one  equal  undivided  sixth  Part  of  100  Acres,  in 
the  said  Township  of  Oxford,  including  a  very  valuable 
Stream,  suitable  for  any  Kind  of  Water- works,  adjoining 
Lands  of  Governor  Penn. 

One  undivided  sixth  Part  of  20  Acres,  in  the  aforesaid 
Township,  on  the  Southwesterly  Side  of  the  last  men- 
tioned Tract,  and  bounded  on  all  other  Sides  by  Lands 
belonging  to  the  Vanetta's,  containing  an  inexhaustible 
Quantity  of  the  richest  Iron  Ore  in  New-Jersey,  lying 
within  a  few  Hundred  Yards  of  the  River  Delaware. 

Also  one  equal  undivided  Moiety,  or  half  Part  of  160 
Acres  of  extraordinary  Land,  in  Newtown,  in  the  County 
of  Sussex,  and  Province  aforesaid,  lying  at  the  foot  of 
the  Slate  Mountain,  bounded  by  Joseph  Hull  to  the  North- 
west, and  by  the  Division  Line  between  East  and  West- 
Jersey,  to  the  Northeast. 

One  equal  undivided  Moiety,  or  half  Part  of  422  Acres 
of  very  valuable  Land,  mostly  rich  Meadow  Ground,  sit- 
uate in  the  Township  and  County  aforesaid,  on  a  Branch 
of  the  River  Paquass;  adjoining  Lands  now  or  late 
Thomas  Pettit's. 

One  equal  undivided  Moiety,  or  half  Part  of  303  Acres, 
as  valuable  Land  as  any  in  the  Neighbourhood,  situate 
in  the  Township  of  Greenwich,  in  the  County  of  Sussex; 
bounded  by  Lands  of  Clark  Rodman,  and  Joseph  Kirk- 
bride,  Part  of  the  said  Land  being  cleared,  and  in  Fence. 

Also  all  the  said  Richard  Reading's  Share  of  a  certain 
well  known  valuable  Copper  Mine,  at  Walpack,  with  a 
sufficient  Quantity  of  Land  thereunto  belonging.  The 
Vendue  to  begin  at  Ten  o' Clock  in  the  Forenoon;  where 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  75 

Attendance  will  be  given  by  JAMES  JAUNCEY,  JOHN  Cox, 
junior,  and  THOMAS  PRYOR,  junior,  Assignees. 

To  be  SOLD  by  the  subscriber,  living  in  Springfield,  in 
the  county  of  Burlington,  and  province  of  New-Jersey,  a 
large  brick  house,  kitchen,  and  other  improvements,  with 
a  lot  of  ground,  containing  about  3  acres,  situate  in  the 
city  of  Burlington,  on  the  west  side  of  High-street,  a  little 
above  the  Court-House;  it  is  in  a  good  place  for  a  shop- 
keeper, or  other  public  business.  For  terms  of  sale,  apply 
to  DANIEL  SMITH,  jun.  living  in  the  said  city,  or  to  the 
subscriber,  at  his  house  in  Springfield  aforesaid. 

DANIEL  DOUGHTY. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2047,  March  17, 
1768. 

To  the  Public. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  a  School  is  erected  at  New- 
Brunswick,  in  New-Jersey,  in  which  the  learned  languages 
and  mathamaticks  are  carefully  and  accurately  taught  by 
Caleb  Cooper,  recommended  from  Nassau-Hall,  an  able 
and  well  accomplished  tutor  in  these  and  other  branches 
of  literature,  under  the  inspection  of  the  Rev.  John  Light, 
the  Rev.  Jacob  R.  Hardenburg,  the  Rev.  /.  H.  Van  Har- 
lingen,  the  Rev.  Abraham  Beach,  Dr.  John  Cochran  and 
William  Oakee,  Esq. 

The  conditions  are  twenty  shillings  entrance,  and  four 
pounds  per  annum,  for  tuition,  proclamation  money. 

Boarding  may  be  had  in  this  town,  to  satisfaction,  as 
cheap  as  can  be  expected,  and  sufficient  to  accommodate  a 
large  school,  which,  including  tuition,  will  not  exceed 
twenty  pounds  a  year. 

This  town,  besides  its  agreeable  rural  situation,  has  the 
great  advantage  of  a  wholesome  pleasant  air,  and  hence 


76  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

its  being  very  healthy  to  recommend  it Properties 

evinced  from  long  experience  by  the  inhabitants,  and  the 
suffrage  of  gentlemen,  strangers,  acquainted  with  it.  It 
is  also  surrounded  by  an  extensive  plentiful  country,  from 
which  it  has  constant  supplies  of  all  necessaries  of  life  in 
great  variety  and  plenty,  and  from  the  sea,  in  the  season, 
has  also  plenty  of  fish,  oysters,  &c. 

The  ready  and  easy  conveyance  of  letters  and  goods  by 
water  or  by  land  to  Philadelphia,  New-York,  and  other 
parts,  is  another  peculiar  advantage  it  enjoys :  And  in  a 
religious  view,  exceeds  any  other  place  in  the  province, 
having  divine  worship  performed  in  the  English  episco- 
pal, Dutch  reformed,  and  Presbyterian  churches;  and  as 
to  the  inhabitants,  with  regard  to  their  manners  and  other 
social  virtues,  compared  with  other  places,  without  preju- 
dice may  be  said  to  be  irreproachable. 

The  inspectors  propose  to  visit  the  school  at  least  once 
a  quarter,  to  inquire  into  the  deportment  of  all  concerned, 
and  assist  the  master  and  scholars  in  all  necessary  regula- 
tions with  regard  to  decency  and  good  order,  as  well  as 
the  advancement  of  learning. 

N.  B.  This  school  from  the  skill  and  diligence  of  the 
tutor,  as  well  as  the  uncommon  progress  which  the  pupils 
have  made  in  learning,  in  less  than  six  months,  gives  a 
pleasing  prospect  of  its  increase. 

THE  Members  of  the  New-Jersey  Medical  Society  are 
desired  to  remember,  that  their  next  stated  General  Meet- 
ing will  be  on  the  first  Tuesday  in  May  next,  at  the  House 
of  Mr.  William  Hick,  in  Princeton;  and  as  some  very 
important  Affairs  respecting  the  future  Establishment, 
&c.  of  said  Society  will  be  then  taken  into  Consideration, 
whereby  its  benevolent  Intentions  may  be  more  fully  an- 
swered; it  is  expected  every  Member  will  make  a  Point 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  77 

of  attending,   and  not  absent  himself  unless   something 
very  extraordinary  should  interfere. 

Those  Gentlemen  of  the  Profession  who  have  not 
joined,  are  again  invited,  and  for  the  above  Reasons,  it 
would  be  extremely  agreeable  to  the  Society  that  as  many 
as  possible  would  attend  the  ensuing  General  Meeting. 

MOSES  BLOOMFIELD,  Secretary. 
Woodbridge,  N.  Jersey. 
March  23,   1768. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  63,  March  21-28, 
1768. 

London  December  29.  By  a  gentleman  arrived  in  town 
from  Perth- Amboy,  in  America,  we  are  informed,  that  a 
manufactory  of  shaloons  and  serges,  very  good  in  quality, 
has  lately  been  set  on  foot  there.  [/  don't  remember  that 
there  is  one  weaver  in  the  capital  part  of  Perth- Amboy, 
neither  have  the  whole  corporation  sheep  for  a  manufac- 
tory. ] 

An  Advertisement  to  the  PUBLIC. 
THE  principal  design  of  the  appeal  to  the  public1  was,  to 


i  This  publication  was  one  of  a  considerable  series  issued,  on  the 
subject  of  an  American  Episcopate.  Some  idea  of  the  character  and 
extent  of  the  controversy  may  be  obtained  from  the  following  titles 
of  works  in  the  library  of  the  editor  of  this  volume: 

A  |  Sermon  |  Preached  before  the  |  Incorporated  Society  |  for  the  | 
Propagation  of  the  Gospel  in  |  Foreign  Parts;  |  at  their  |  Anniversary- 
Meeting  |  in  the  |  Parish  Church  of  St.  Mary-le-Bow,  |  On  Friday  Feb- 
ruary 20,  1767.  |  By  the  Right  Reverend  Father  in  God,  |  John  Lord 
Bishop  of  Landaff.  i  London:  |  Printed  by  E.  Owen  and  T.  Harrison 
in  |  Warwick-Lane.  |  MDCCLXVII.  i  Sm.  4to.  Pp.  98,  1. 

Sermon,  pp.  26;  Abstract  of  Charter  of  the  Society,  Proceedings, 
Names  of  the  Society's  Missionaries  in  America,  Reports  from  the 
Missions,  etc.,  pp.  27-77;  blank,  1  page;  List  of  Members  of  the  Soci- 
ety, pp.  79-93;  Ladies  Annual  Subscribers,  p.  94;  Preachers  before  the 
Society,  1701-1767,  pp.  95-98;  Form  of  Legacy,  p.  [99]. 

In  this  Sermon  the  Bishop  deplored  the  heathenism  and  infidelity 
prevalent  in  America,  the  lack  of  efforts  to  convert  the  Indians,  the 
want  of  seminaries  to  train  young  men  for  the  ministry,  and  (pp.  20-24) 
urges  the  appointment  of  American  Bishops  to  remedy  these  evils. 

[Half  Title:]  Dr.  Chauncy's  |  Remarks  |  On  certain  Passages  in  1 
The  Bishop  of  Landaff 's  |  Society-Sermon.  |  [Full  Title:]  A  |  Letter 
I  To  a  Friend,  |  Containing,  |  Remarks  on  certain  Passages  in  a  |  Ser- 
mon |  Preached,  by  the  Right  Reverend  Father  |  in  God,  John  Lord 


78  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

assign  the  reasons  for  which  the  members  of  the  church 
of  England  in  America,  are  desirous  of  having  Bishops  to 
reside  in  this  country,  to  state  and  explain  the  plan  on 
which  alone  American  Bishops  have  been  proposed  and 
requested,  and  to  obviate  and  confute  the  objections,  that 
might  be  supposed  to  arise  in  the  minds  of  many  against 
such  an  episcopate.  Whether  the  reasons  assigned  are 
not  sufficient  to  justify  the  late  application  of  the  clergy 

Bishop  of  Landaff,  [  before  the  Incorporated  Society  for  the  |  Propaga- 
tion of  the  Gospel  in  Foreign  |  Parts,  at  their  Anniversary  Meeting  in 
the  I  Parish  Church  of  St.  Mary-Le-Bow,  Fe-  |  bruary  20.  1767.  In 
which  the  highest  |  Reproach  is  undeservedly  cast  upon  the  |  American 
Colonies.  |  By  Charles  Chauncy,  D.  D.  |  Pastor  of  the  first  Church  of 
Christ  in  Boston.  [  Boston:  Printed  by  Kneeland  and  Adams  |  in 
Milk- Street,  for  Thomas  Leverett,  in  Corn-hill.  MDCCLXVII.  8vo. 

Pp.  56. 

Dr.  Chauncy  claims  that  the  American  Colonists,  especially  in  New 
Kngland,  are  exceptionally  pious  and  zealous  in  good  works;  that  they 
successfully  prosecuted  missions  among  the  Indians  more  than  sixty 
years  before  the  Society  was  formed;  that  there  were  six  seminaries 
in  America,  three  of  them  Episcopalian;  that  of  the  sixty  or  seventy 
Episcopalian  churches  (thirty  in  New  England),  not  more  than  eight 
were  self-supporting,  while  in  New  England  alone  there  were  550  Con- 
gregational and  Presbyterian  churches. 

A  |  Letter  |  to  the  |  Right  Reverend  Father  in  God,  [  John,  Lord 
Bishop  of  Landaff;  |  Occasioned  by  |  Some  Passages  in  his  Lordship's 
Sermon,  on  the  20th  )  of  February,  1767,  in  which  the  American  Col- 
onies |  are  loaded  with  great  and  undeserved  Reproach.  |  By  William 
Livingston.  |  Boston:  |  Re-printed  and  Sold  by  Kneeland  and  Adams, 
I  next  to  the  Treasurer's  Office,  in  Milk-street.  |  MDCCLXVIII.  8vo. 
Pp.  26. 

First  printed  at  New  York.  Mr.  Livingston  objects  to  the  aspersions 
on  the  Colonists  as  having  "abandoned  their  native  manners  and  re- 
ligion," and  points  out  the  laws  in  New  England  requiring  lands  to  be 
set  apart  in  every  new  township  for  the  erection  of  churches;  he  claims 
a  more  general  observance  of  the  Sabbath  in  America  than  in  London, 
and  shrinks  from  any  further  manifestation  of  England's  power,  polit- 
ical or  ecclesiastical,  in  the  Colonies. 

Hildeburn  mentions  (No.  2373)  a  Philadelphia  edition,  but  the  title 
is  taken  evidently  from  a  newspaper  advertisement,  and  not  from  a 
copy  of  the  book  itself. 

A  |  Vindication;  |  of  |  The  Bishop  of  Landaff's  Sermon  |  from  |  The 
gross  Misrepresentations,  |  and  |  Abusive  Reflections,  |  contained  |  in 
Mr.  William  Livingston's  Letter  |  To  his  Lordship:  |  With  |  Some  Addi- 
tional Observations  |  On  certain  Passages  in  Dr.  Chauncey's  Remarks, 
&c;  |  By  a  Lover  of  Truth  and  Decency.  |  Quid  verum  atque  decens 
euro  et  rogo,  et  omnis  in  hoc  sum.  Horace.  I  Non  equidem  hoc  studeo 
bullatis  ut  mihi  nugis  |  Pagina  turgeseat,  dare  pondus  idonea  fumo. 
Persius.  New- York:  J  Printed  by  J.  Holt,  at  the  Exchange,  | 
M,DCC,LXVIII.  1  8vo.  Pp.  viii,  82. 

By  the  Rev.  Charles  Inglis,  Rector  of  Trinity  Church,  New  York. 

A  Letter  to  a  Friend,  |  Containing  Remarks  on  certain  Passages  in 
a  Ser-  |  mon,  preached  by  the  Right  Reverend  John.  |  Lord  Bishop  of 
Landaff,  before  the  incorporated  |  Society  for  the  Propagation  of  the 
Gospel  in  foreign  |  Parts,  at  the  anniversary  Meeting,  in  the  Parish 
I  Church  of  St.  Mary  Le  Bow,  London.  February  20,  |  1767;  in  which 
the  highest  Reproach  is  unde-  I  servedly  cast  upon  the  American  Col- 
onies. |  By  Charles  Chauncy,  D.  D.  |  Pastor  of  the  first  Church  of 
Christ  in  Boston.  |  Boston,  in  N.  E.  printed  MDCCLXVH.  |  London,  re- 
printed MDCCLXVIII.  |  With  a  supplement,  |  Containing  an  Answer  to 


i;68] 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  79 


for  Bishops,  whether  the  nature  of  the  proposed  epis- 
copate is  not  honestly  and  fairly  represented  and  ex- 
plained, and  whether  the  most  considerable  objections 
against  it  are  not  obviated  and  confuted  in  the  appeal,  is 
submitted  to  the  judgment  of  the  reader,  but  N.  B.  not  of 
those  who  are  not  readers  of  the  pamphlet.  The  author 
was,  and  is,  fully  persuaded  of  the  goodness  of  the  cause 
'which  he  undertook  to  plead;  and,  although  sensible  of 

the  Plea  of  T.  B.  |  Chandler,  D.  D.  of  New  Jersey,  for  American  | 
Bishops:  Wherein  his  Reasonings  are  shewn  to  I  be  fallacious,  and 
iiis  Claims  indefensible.  |  By  a  Presbyter  in  Old  England.  |  London, 
printed,  for  S.  Bladon,  in  Paternoster-row,  I  MDCCLXVIII  I  8vo.  Pp. 
79,  1. 

A  Letter,  etc.,  pp.  42;  A  Supplement,  etc.,  pp.  43-79;  Address 
of  the  clergy  of  the  Church  of  England  in  New-Jersey  and  New-York, 
to  the  Chancellor,  etc.,  of  the  University  of  Cambridge,  p.  [80]. 

An  |  Appeal  to  the  Public,  |  in  I  Behalf  |  of  the  |  Church  of  England  | 
in  |  America.  |  By  Thomas  Bradbury  Chandler,  D.  D.  |  Rector  of  St. 
John's  Church,  in  Elizabeth-Town,  New-Jersey,  |  and  Missionary  from 
the  Society  for  the  Propagation  of  |  the  Gospel,  &c.  |  "We  desire  a  fair 
Trial — if  we  are  guilty,  punish  us;  if  I  we  are  innocent,  protect  us." 
Justin  Martyr.  I  New- York:  |  Printed  by  James  Parker,  at  the  New- 
Prin-  I  ting-Office,  in  Beaver- Street.  |  M,  DCC,  LXVII.  8vo.  Two 
titles,  2  11.;  Pp.  i-xii,  127. 

Hildeburn  mentions  (No.  2286)  a  Philadelphia  edition,  printed  by 
William  Goddard,  1767,  but  as  he  gives  neither  lined-off  title,  number 
of  pages,  nor  location  of  a  copy,  it  is  evident  that  he  never  saw  the 
book,  and  doubtless  took  the  title  from  a  newspaper  advertisement. 
It  is  not  probable  that  there  was  such  an  edition. 

The  Dedication  to  the  Archibishop  of  Canterbury  is  dated  Elizabeth- 
Town,  in  New-Jersey,  June  24,  1767.  In  the  Advertisement  to  the 
Reader,  Dr.  Chandler  says  this  Appeal  was  written  primarily  at  the 
request  of  the  Rev.  Dr.  Samuel  Johnson,  of  Stratford,  Conn.,  subse- 
quently supported  by  the  request  of  a  Convention  of  the  Clergy  of 
New  York  and  New  Jersey. 

[Half  Title:]  Dr.  Chauncy's  \  Answer  |  To  Dr.  Chandler's  |  Appeal 
to  the  Public.  |  [Full  Title:]  The  |  Appeal  |  to  the  |  Public  Answered,  I 
In  behalf  of  the  Non-Episcopal  |  Churches  in  America;  |  containing  | 
Remarks  on  what  Dr.  Thomas  Brad-  |  bury  Chandler  has  advanced, 
on  the  |  four  following  Points.  |  The  Original  and  Nature  of  the  Epis- 
copal Office.  |  Reasons  for  sending  Bishops  to  America.  |  The  Plan  on 
which  it  is  proposed  to  send  them.  |  And  the  Objections  against  send- 
ing them  obviated  |  and  refuted.  !  Wherein  the  \  Reasons  for  an  Amer- 
ican Episcopate  |  are  shewn  to  be  insufficient,  |  and  the  Ob-  |  jections 
against  it  in  full  Force.  |  By  Charles  Chauncy,  D.  D.  |  And  Pastor  of 
the  first  Church  of  Christ  in  Boston.  |  Boston:  N.  E.  |  Printed  by 
Kneeland  and  Adams,  in  Milk-Street,  for  |  Thomas  Leverett,  in  Corn- 
hill.  1768.  |  8vo.  Pp.  205.  (P.  206,  advertisement  of  books  for  sale  by 
Thomas  Leverett.) 

Hildeburn  mentions  (No.  2349)  a  Philadelphia  edition,  but  the  title 
is  evidently  taken  from  a  newspaper  advertisement,  and  not  from  a 
copy  of  the  book.  It  is  not  probable,  that  there  was  such  an  edition. 

A  |  Letter,  |  concerning  |  an  |  American  Bishop,  &c.  f  to  |  Dr.  Brad- 
bury Chandler,  |  Ruler  of  St.  John's  Church,  in  |  Elizabeth-Town.  | 
In  Answer  to  the  I  Appendix  |  Of  His  1  Appeal  to  the  Public,  &e.  | 
Printed,  A.  D.  1768.  1  8vo.  Pp.  19. 

An  argument  against  the  validity  of  the  ordination  of  the  English 
Bishops,  and  against  the  dangers  of  an  encroachment  on  American 
liberties  by  American  Bishops. 


80  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

his  inability  to  do  it  justice,  he  had  the  vanity  to  think 
himself  able  to  satisfy  the  public,  as  to  the  main  points  on 
which  it  depended.  With  this  opinion  he  entered  upon 
the  work,  and  in  the  execution  of  it  he  was  particularly 
careful  to  avoid  giving  offence,  and  to  treat  every  denom- 
ination of  Christians,  every  set  of  men  whom  he  had  occa- 
sion to  mention,  with  great  tenderness  and  all  proper  re- 
spect. 

According-  to  Hildeburn,  printed  at  Philadelphia  by  W.  and  T.  Brad- 
ford. See  "Issues  of  the  Press  in  Pennsylvania,"  No.  2370. 

A  |  Letter  |  To  the  Right  Honourable  |  Horatio  Walpole,  Esq;  | 
Written  Jan.  9,  1750-1,  |  By  the  Right  Reverend  |  Thomas  Seeker, 
LL.  D.  [  Lord  Bishop  of  Oxford:  |  concerning-  |  Bishops  in  America.  | 
London:  |  Printed  for  J.  and  F.  Rivington,  at  the  Bible  and  |  Crown, 
(No.  62)  in  St.  Paul's  Church-Yard.  |  M  DCC  LXIX.  |  8vo.  Pp.  (4),  28. 

"Printed  in  obedience  to  an  order  left  with  it  under  his  Grace's  own 
hand  (dated  May  25,  1759),"  directing  it  to  be  printed  after  his  death. 
Earnestly  advocates  the  sending-  of  two  or  three  Bishops  to  America, 
to  ordain  young  men  to  the  ministry,  etc.,  whereby  the  Church  would 
be  strengthened,  the  Colonies  more  closely  bound  to  the  mother  coun- 
try, and  the  churches  provided  with  young  men  of  the  best  families, 
instead  of  depending  on  strangers  and  vagabonds.  Parliament,  at  its. 
last  session,  without  opposition  from  anybody,  had  expressly  estab- 
lished Moravian  Bishops  in  America.  "Why  then  should  there  be  such 
Fear  of  establishing  Bishops  of  the  Church  of  England?" 

The   |  Appeal  Defended:    |  or,  the   |  Proposed  American  Episcopate   | 
Vindicated,    |   In  Answer  to   |   the   |   Objections  and  Misrepresentations. 
I  of  Dr.  Chauncy  and  Others.  |  By  Thomas  Bradbury  Chandler,  D.  D. ;  I 
There  are  some  Spirits  in  the  World,  who,  unless  they  are  in  actual  | 
Possession  of  Despotism  themselves,  are  daily  haunted  with  the  Appre- 
hension of  being  subject  to  it  in  others;    and  who  seem  to  speak  and 
act  under  the  strange  Persuasion,  that  every  Thing  short  of  Persecu- 
tion against  what   they   dislike,   must  terminate    in   the   Persecution 


of  |  themselves.  |  Lett,  to  the  Author  of  the  Confessional.  |  New- York: 

igh  Gai 
769.  I  8vo.     Title  1  1.;     Advertisement,  pp.  2;    Contents,  pp.  v;    Errata, 


Printed  by  Hugh  Gaine,  at  the  Bible  and  Crown,  I  in  Hanover- Square, 
1769.   f  8vo.     T 
(1);    Pp.  268. 


Hildeburn  mentions  (No.  2429)  a  Philadelphia  edition,  but  the  title 
is  evidently  taken  from  a  newspaper  advertisement,  and  not  from  a 
copy  of  the  book  itself.  It  is  not  probable  that  there  was  such  an 
edition. 

[Half  title:]  Dr.  Chauncy's  |  Reply  |  to  |  Dr.  Chandler's  |  'Appeal 
Defended.'  [Full  title:]  A  |  Reply  |  to  |  Dr.  Chandler's  |  'Appeal  De- 
fended:' |  wherein  |  His  Mistakes  are  rectified,  his  false  Arguing  |  re- 
futed, and  the  Objections  against  |  the  Planned  American  Episcopate 
|  shewn  to  remain  in  full  Force,  notwith-  |  standing  all  he  has  offered 
to  render  |  them  invalid.  |  By  |  Charles  Chauncy,  D.  D.  |  Pastor  of  the 
First  Church  in  Boston.  |  [Eleven  Lines  of  Quotation.]  |  Boston:  | 
Printed  by  Daniel  Kneeland,  opposite  the  Pro-  |  bate-Office,  in  Queen- 
Street,  for  Thomas  |  Leverett,  in  Corn-hill.  |  MD,  CC,LXX.  |  8vo.  Pp. 
180.  Appendix,  pp.  x. 

A  Critical  |  Commentary  |  on  |  Archbishop  Seeker's  Letter  |  to  the  | 

Right  Honourable  Horatio  Walpole.   |  concerning  |  Bishops  in  America. 

-  Meditor   esse   affabilis,    |    Et   bene   procedit.   —          |    Paulatim 

plebem  primulum  facio  meam.   j  London:   \  Printed  for  E.  and  C.  Dilly, 

in  the  Poultry.   |   MDCCLXX    |  16mo.     Pp.  111. 

By  the  Rev.  Francis  Blackburne,  Archdeacon  of  Cleveland. 

[Half  title:]  An  1  Address  |  to   |  The  Episcopalians   |  in  |  Virginia.   \ 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  8 1 

The  appeal,  upon  its  first  publication,  was  received  as 
favourably  as  the  author  could  expect;  several  persons, 
of  different  principles  and  characters,  who  condescended 
to  read  it,  being  then  pleased  to  testify  their  general  ap- 
probation of  the  performance.  If  it  has  been  treated  by 
some  persons  latterly  in  a  different  manner,  perhaps  it  has 
been  owing  to  motives  that  have  occurr'd  since  the  time 
of  its  publication.  A  general  attack  from  different  quar- 
ters has  been,  at  length,  projected,  and  some  of  the  com- 
batants begin  to  shew  themselves. 

[Full  title:]  An  |  Address  I  From  the  Clergy  |  of  |  New-York  and  New- 
Jersey,  |  to  the  |  Episcopalians  in  Virginia;  |  Occasioned  |  By  some  late 
Transactions  |  In  that  Colony  |  Relative  to  |  An  |  American  Episcopate. 

I  Quis  Furor  este  novus?     Quo  nunc,  quo  tenditis,  iniquit  |  non 

Hostem,    inimicaque   Castra   I   Argivum:    Vestras   Spes,   uritis.   | 

Virg.  Aen.  v.  670.  |  New- York:  |  Printed  by  Hugh  Gaine,  at  the  Bible 
and  Crown,  |  in  Hanover-Square,  1771.  |  8vo.  Titles,  2  11.  Pp.  58. 

The  |  Appeal  |  farther  defended;  |  in  answer  to  |  the  |  Farther  Misrep- 
resentations |  of  |  Dr.  Chauncy.  I  By  Thomas  B.  Chandler,  D.  D.  |  

Not  using  your  Liberty  for  a  Cloak  of  Maliciousness.  |  St.  Peter.  |  If 
the  Presbyterian  Parity  had  any  Place  in  the  primitive  |  Times  as 
some  do  imagine,  it  must  needs  have  been  an  |  intolerable  Kind  of 
Government,  since  all  on  the  sudden  it  |  was  universally  abolished.  | 
Maurice  against  Baxter.  |  New- York:  |  Printed  by  Hugh  Gaine,  at  his 
Book  Store  and  |  Printing-Office,  in  Hanover- Square.'  I  M,  DCC.LXXI. 
|  8vo.  Title,  1  leaf;  Contents.  Pp.  iii-vi;  Errata,  1  leaf;  The  Appeal, 
etc.,  pp.  240. 

A  |  Free  Examination  |  of  the  |  Critical  Commentary  |  on  |  Arch- 
bishop Seeker's  Letter  |  to  |  Mr.  Walpole:  |  To  which  is  added,  |  By 
Way  of  Appendix,  |  a  copy  of  I  Bishop  Sherlock's  Memorial.  |  By 
Thomas  B.  Chandler,  D.  D.  j  Surely,  no  great  Matters  can  be  depended 
on,  from  the  Tolerating  I  Spirit  of  those  Persons,  were  We  upon  Terms 
of  supplicating  it,  who  |  can  allow  themselves  in  all  the  Arts  of  Mis- 
representation, in  Order  |  to  blacken  the  Reputations  of  those  Advo- 
cates for  our  Faith  (and  |  Discipline)  while  living,  and  their  Memo- 
ries when  dead,  who  had  set  |  them  Examples  of  a  real  Moderation  in 
every  Respect,  the  Force  of  (  their  Reasonings  only  excepted.  I  Dr  G 
Fothergill.  |  New- York:  |  Printed  by  H.  Gaine,  at  the  Bible  and  Crown, 
in  |  Hanover- Square,  |  MDCCLXXV  .  |  8vo.  Pp.  xii,  122,  Errata,  1,  Ad- 
vertisement of  four  of  the  preceding  works,  for  sale  by  Hugh  Gaine,  1. 

A  Collection  of  Tracts  from  the  News  Papers  &c.  containing  par- 
ticularly, The  American  Whig,  A  Whip  for  the  American  Whig,  with 
some  other  Pieces,  On  the  Subject  of  the  Residence  of  Protestant 
Bishops  in  the  American  Colonies,  and  in  answer  to  the  Writers  who 
opposed  it,  &c.  New  York.  John  Holt,  1768.  8vo.  Pp.  208. 

The  present  writer's  copy  is  imperfect,  containing  only  pp.  9-164. 
Vol.  II.,  pp.  406,  1,  was  published  by  John  Holt,  New  York,  1769.  Brin- 
ley,  No.  6135. 

"The  American  Whig"  was  a  series  of  essays  published  in  The  New 
York  Gazette,  and  generally  ascribed  to  William  Livingston.  These  es- 
says were  republished  in  the  Philadelphia  and  Boston  newspapers.  "A 
Whip  for  the  American  Whig,"  by  "Timothy  Tickle,"  really  by  the 
clergy  of  the  English  church;  "The  Centinel"  was  published  in  the 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  the  authors  being  supposed  to  be  Dr.  Allison,  Vice 
Provost  of  the  College  of  Philadelphia,  assisted  by  a  number  of  his 
Presbyterian  brethren,  and  John  Dickinson.  Then  there  was  "A  Kick 
for  the  Whipper."  by  "Sir  Isaac  Foot;"  "The  Anatomist."  by  the  Rev. 
Dr.  William  Smith,  of  Philadelphia,  in  reply  to  "The  Centinel,"  etc.. 
etc. 


82  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

The  author  is  not  unwilling  to  re-examine  any  thing 
that  has  been  advanced  or  asserted  in  the  course  of  the 
appeal,  and  to  have  the  subject  "fairly  and  candidly  de- 
bated, before  the  tribunal  of  the  public,"  being  still  of 
opinion,  that  the  plea  for  American  Bishops,  the  more 
closely  it  is  examined,  and  the  better  it  is  understood,  will 
appear  proportionably  to  greater  advantage.  Whatever 
therefore  shall  be  offered  on  the  subject  in  a  reasonable  and 
decent  way,  he  thinks  it  his  duty  to  attend  to,  but  to  noth- 
ing farther.  As  to  personal  abuse,  he  thinks  he  does  not 
deserve  it,  even  from  the  enemies  of  an  American  episco- 
pate, to  whom  he  has  behaved  respectfully;  and  he  is  de- 
termined not  to  regard  what  every  innocent  and  honest 
man  ought  to  despise.  But  although  he  consents  to  de- 
bate matters  with  any  one,  who  has  the  appearance  and 
manner  of  a  gentleman,  yet  he  chuses  not  to  enter  the  lists, 
in  a  match  of  flinging  dirt,  with  scrubs  and  scavengers. 

Which  of  these  characters  the  American  Whig  (for 
America  has  whigs)  will  think  proper  to  appear  in,  can 
hardly  be  judged  from  his  first  exhibition;  but  I  am  sorry 
to  say  that  I  look  upon  his  symptoms  to  be  rather  unfav- 
ourable. I  have  also  been  told  by  some  who  pretend  to 
know  him,  that  this  same  Whig  (who  by  the  bye  is  rep- 
resented to  have  as  many  heads  as  the  monster  Hydra)  is 
violently  enraged  at  Somebody  and  Something,  and  has 
sworn  revenge  upon  me.  If  so,  in  what  manner  I  shall 
be  treated,  may  be  easily  conjectured.  But  why  should  I 
be  singled  out  as  the  mark  of  his  resentment?  If  some 
people  have  failed  in  their  application  for  a  charter,  and 
have  been  disappointed  in  the  late  election,  how  can  I  help 
it  ?  These  are  no  affairs  of  mine,  and  I  am  not  answerable 
for  them. 

I  make  it  a  general  rule  to  myself,  to  treat  all  persons 
with  as  much  notice  and  respect  as  they  deserve.  Upon 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  83 

this  principle  I  propose  to  conduct  myself  towards  the 
American  Whig;  so  that  what  treatment  he  is  to  receive 
from  me,  will  depend  greatly  upon  his  future  behaviour. 
So  far  as  he  shall  reason,  or  shall  appear  to  think  that  he 
reasons,  he  will  have  a  claim  to  my  notice;  so  far  as  he 
shall  rail,  he  will  be  beneath  it.  Not  a  single  argument 
that  is  pertinent  to  the  subject,  shall  escape  my  attention, 
and,  if  it  pleases  God  to  continue  my  health,  I  will  either 
confess  its  force,  or  shew  its  weakness. 

But  he  must  excuse  my  not  attending  him  in  a  weekly 
paper.  For  such  a  task  I  cannot  always  promise  myself 
leisure;  and,  in  the  present  case,  I  confess,  I  have  no  great 
inclination.  Some  of  my  objections  against  this  mode  of 
defence,  are  the  following. 

ist.  I  cannot  engage  with  him  upon  equal  terms.  If 
I  appear  in  this  way,  it  must  be  in  my  own  person;  but 
my  opponent  is  covered  with  a  mask  (and  for  a  particular 
"reason  it  is  his  interest  that  he  should  remain  for  ever 
masked")  and  an  engagement  by  two  persons  under  such 
different  circumstances,  would  afford  to  the  public  but 
an  odd  spectacle.  While  I  should  risque  my  own  charac- 
ter and  reputation  in  the  fray,  I  know  not,  until  I  can  dis- 
cover the  real  features  of  my  antagonist,  whether  he  has 
any  reputation  and  character  to  risque.  For  this  reason 
it  has  been  generally  esteemed  base  and  ungenerous,  for  a 
writer  who  disguises  or  conceals  himself,  to  attack  an  au- 
thor who  stands  fairly  upon  open  ground.  Such  a  method 
of  carrying  on  hostilities  has  been  looked  upon  as  a  sort 
of  literary  bush-fighting,  to  which  it  is  almost  as  incon- 
sistent to  expose  one's  self,  as  it  is  with  honour  to  practice. 
2dly.  There  appears  to  me  to  be  a  great  unfitness  and 
impropriety  in  such  a  contest,  on  other  accounts.  The 
Appeal,  agreeably  to  the  importance  of  its  subject,  was 
written  with  real  and  great  seriousness;  and  the  defence 


84  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

of  it,  when  undertaken  by  its  author,  ought  to  be  carried 
on  in  the  same  manner.  But  the  attack  of  our  Whig  is 
like  to  be  conducted  with  a  very  different  spirit.  No.  i, 
from  which  we  must  at  present  judge,  is  penned  altogether 
in  a  ludicrous  strain;  it  is  thickly  bespangled  with  droll- 
ery, it  frequently  flashes  with  witticisms  (but  observe 
gentle  reader,  they  are  of  a  spurious  breed,)  and,  in  short, 
ridicules  the  general  subject  of  the  Appeal  and  its  various 
parts.  Now  as  this  has  never  been  allowed  to  be  the  fair- 
est method  of  dealing  with  any  thing  that  is  serious,  so 
serious  answers  to  funny  writers,  like  throwing  pearls  be- 
fore a  certain  kind  of  animals,  are  looked  upon  as  improp- 
erly applied,  and  yet  none  but  serious  answers,  as  has  been 
said,  doth  it  become  the  author  of  the  Appeal  to  give.  He 
proposes  therefore  to  reserve  himself  for  the  present,  and 
to  watch  whether  anything  solid  can  come  from  so  ludi- 
crous and  frothy  a  writer.  He  is  so  intirely  void  of  spleen, 
and  ill-nature,  and  prejudice  against  this  writer,  that  he  is 
ready  to  confess  the  nimble  turns  and  motions  of  his  pen, 
and  can  laugh  as  heartily  at  any  monkey  tricks  he  can 
exhibit  for  the  amusement  of  his  Majesty's  liege  subjects, 
as  any  other  person.  In  the  mean  while,  if  any  one  who  is 
not  under  these  restraints,  shall  incline  to  divert  himself 
with,  or  to  endeavour  to  bring  to  order,  this  hussar  in 
controversy,  who  will  confine  himself  to  no  rules,  but  as 
the  whim  takes  him  will  fly  from  front  to  rear,  and  from 
flank  to  center,  he  has  my  consent. 

3dly.  I  object  against  immediately  engaging  with  the 
American  Whig,  because  it  is  yet  uncertain  whether  he 
will  produce  any  thing  worthy  of  notice,  and  because  I 
think  it  adviseable  to  see  the  amount  of  his  whole  per- 
formances, that  I  may  have  it  in  my  power  to  choose  for 
myself  in  wThat  manner  to  deal  with  him. 

4thly.    Another  objection  arises  from  the  strange  aver- 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  85 

sion  I  have  to  a  repetition  of  the  same  things.  Now  it 
happens,  that  among  others,  a  gentleman  of  character  in 
Boston1  has  undertaken  a  confutation  of  the  hapless  Ap- 
peal; and  he  is  intitled,  both  from  his  known  reputation, 
and  his  open  and  manly  method  of  advancing,  to  particular 
respect.  I  know  of  no  one,  at  present,  that  bids  as  fair  to 
be  the  object  of  my  principal  attention  as  this  gentleman; 
as  to  those  anonymous  writers  who  shall  please  to  favour 
me  with  their  animadversions  on  my  pamphlet,  they  will 
not  take  it  amiss,  if  I  consider  them  as  belonging  to  an 
inferior  class.  They  must  be  contented,  so  far  as  their 

arguments  shall  correspond  with  those  of  Dr.  C y,  to 

take  their  places  in  his  train,  and  hear  what  I  have  to  say 
to  him;  but  in  any  cases  wherein  they  shall  be  thought 
to  deserve  special  notice,  they  shall  have  it  occasionally. 

Having  thus  declared  my  intention  to  do  justice  to  all 
men,  I  will  mention  the  manner  in  which  it  will  probably 
be  distributed.  In  the  first  place  I  shall  be  careful  to  dis- 
tinguish reasoning  from  railing,  from  empty  harangue, 
from  the'flourishes  of  wit,  and  from  all  other  heterogen- 
ious  mixtures.  The  reasoning  I  will  keep  for  my  own  use, 
and  leave  all  the  rest  untouched  for  the  original  propri- 
etors, in  order,  that  when  opportunity  offers,  they  may 
bestow  it  more  properly.  I  will  then  make  a  farther  dis- 
tinction, and  mark  out  those  reasons  that  are  immediately 
to  the  purpose,  separating  them  from  those  that  are  but 
remotely  so,  and  from  others  that  shall  have  been  totally 
misapplied.  To  those  of  the  first,  and  second  classes,  I 
will  endeavour  to  give  proper  and  distinct  answers ;  as  to 
those  of  the  third  class,  it  will  be  sufficient  to  shew  their 
impertinence. 

In  this  way  I  hope  I  shall  be  able  to  serve  the  cause  of 
truth,  and  to  remove  prejudices  and  errors;  and,  to  whis- 


i  Dr.   Chauncy. 


86  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

per  a  secret  into  the  ears  of  the  public,  I  do  not  despair, 
that  even  our  American  Whig,  with  all  his  briskness  and 
volatility,  will  be  proselyted  to  the  sober  doctrine  of  the 
Appeal.  For  I  think  his  opposition  cannot  be  of  long  con- 
tinuance, after  the  honest  concession  he  has  made  towards 
the  close  of  his  paper.  "Tis  true,  says  he,  the  pamphlet  is 
specious,  and  appears  to  ask  nothing  but  what  is  highly 
reasonable;  and  could  any  man,  above  the  capacity  of  an 
Idiot,  really  persuade  himself,  that  the  Doctor  and  the 
Convention  would  content  themselves  with  a  Bishop,  so 
limited  and  curtailed  as  he  is  pleased  to  represent  his  fu- 
ture Lordship;  it  were  manifest  injustice  to  deny  them 
what  in  their  opinion  their  eternal  salvation  so  greatly 
depends  upon."  So  that  nothing  appears  to  be  now  want- 
ing to  his  conversion,  but  to  convince  him  that  the  Doctor 
and  the  Convention  would  content  themselves  with  such 
Bishops  as  are  described  in  the  Appeal.  Now  this  is  as 
really  and  certainly  true,  as  that  he  himself  is  a  Whig; 
and  unless  he  is  obstinately  resolved  to  be  deaf  and  blind 
to  all  proper  evidence,  it  can  be  clearly  proved  to  him. 

By  way  of  conclusion,  the  author  of  the  Appeal  begs 
leave  to  assure  the  Public,  that  notwithstanding  the 
charge  brought  against  him  by  the  American  Whig,  he 
neither  knows,  nor  believes,  nor  suspects,  that  he  was  mis- 
represented a  single  fact,  and  to  subscribe  himself 

their  very  respectful 

Elisabeth-Town  and  obedient  Servant. 

March  16,  1768. 

Perth-Amboy,  March  7,  1768. 
To  BE  LETT  for  any  Term  of  Years. 
A  House  at  Amboy,  on  Rariton  River,  opposite  Mr. 
Stevens's  Ferry,  having  two  Parlours,  four  Bed-Cham- 
bers, two  Kitchens,  and  a  Dairy,  with  Cellars  under  the 
whole  House;    a  large  Garden,  well  stored  with  every 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  8/ 

Kind  of  Fruit,  and  Necessaries  for  the  Kitchen;  an  Or- 
chard, a  good  Barn  and  Stables :  As  much  arable  Land 
and  Meadow  may  be  had  with  the  House,  as  the  Tenant 
shall  think  necessary;  a  great  Variety  of  Fish  are  yearly 
taken  in  the  River  before  the  House;  the  Shore  abounds 
with  Shell-Fish  of  many  Kinds,  and  has  the  most  con- 
venient Places  for  bathing,  the  Water  being  salt  enough 
for  that,  and  every  other  Purpose.  Enquire  of  Doctor 
Johnson,  at  Amboy. 

New-York,  March  21,  1768. 
To  BE  SOLD. 

A  Large  Neck  of  Land  lying  in  Monmouth  County,  in 
East  New-Jersey,  in  the  Township  of  Shrewsberry,  at 
Tom's  River,  in  Sight  of  the  Sea,  and  adjoining  on  a  Bay, 
in  which  is  very  fine  fishing  of  all  Sorts,  Winter  and 
Summer,  and  very  Plenty  of  Oysters,  Clams  and  Muscles. 
The  Neck  contains  upwards  of  One  Thousand  Acres, 
whereof  is  at  least  Four  Hundred  Acres  of  the  best  Sort 
of  Salt  Meadow,  which  bears  excellent  good  Grass;  there 
is  a  large  Piece  of  between  Salt  and  Fresh  Meadow  :  The 
Neck  lies  between  two  Creeks,  a  Fence  of  Three  Quarters 
of  a  Mile  long  will  fence  in  the  whole;  there  might  be  kept 
on  the  Neck  Three  Hundred  Head  of  horned  Cattle,  Win- 
ter and  Summer,  and  at  least  one  Thousand  Sheep,  and 
as  many  Hogs,  with  a  small  Expence;  there  is  a  large 
Range  adjoining  for  an  out  Drift  for  Cattle.  If  the  above 
is  not  sold  before  the  23d  of  May  next,  then  the  said  Neck 
will  be  sold  at  Public  Vendue,  on  that  day,  at  the  House 
of  Mr.  JOHN  WILLIAMS,  at  Tiniconck  Bridge:  Whoever 
has  a  Mind  to  purchase  before  the  Day  of  Sale,  may  apply 
to  Abraham  Probasco,  in  Monmouth  County,  Peter  Rem- 
sen,  in  A/>w-Fc>r£,  or  Abraham  Schenck,  at  Bushwick,  on 
Long-Island. 


88  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Also  to  be  sold  a  Saw-Mill  belonging  to  Abraham 
Schenck,  about  Four  Miles  distant  from  the  above  Neck, 
standing  on  a  Branch  of  Tom's  River,  with  1500  Acres  of 
fine  Land  belonging  to  the  Saw-Mill :  The  Saw-Mill  is 
lately  built,  and  in  very  good  Order,  it  rents  now  for 
82,000  Feet  of  good  merchantable  Inch  Boards,  a  Year, 
to  be  delivered  at  the  Landing,  free  of  all  Cost :  Any 
Body  that  has  a  Mind  to  purchase  the  said  Mill,  may  apply 
to  Paul  Schenck,  in  New-York,  or  Abraham  SCHENCK, 
in  Bushwick.  on  Long-Island,  who  will  agree  on  reason- 
able Terms. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1316,  March  21,  1768. 

To  be  LET,  by  William  Kelly, 

A  very  valuable  Tract,  of  about  2000  Acres  of  Land,  in 
the  County  of  Morris,  in  East  New- Jersey,  as  healthy 
a  Country  as  any  in  the  World,  about  15  Miles  from 
Newark,  (a  Sea-port  Town)  in  that  Province,  and 
about  23  Miles  from  New- York. 

THIS  Tract  is  so  fine  a  Body  of  Land,  as  I  believe  few, 
if  any  can  equal  it,  for  Fertility  and  Richness;  about  1500 
Acres  of  which  is  a  rich  low  Ground,  clear  of  Stones, 
black  Mould  from  about  9  to  36  Inches  on  a  Stratum  of 
blue  Clay:  The  Soil  is  as  fine  as  any  in  the  World  for 
Grass,  and  will  grow  any  Kind  of  Grain,  in  so  very  lux- 
uriant a  Manner,  as  to  be  in  Danger  of  lodging  in  high 
Winds.  The  Remainder  in  Upland,  on  which  there  is  a 
fine  Situation  to  build;  commanding  a  Prospect  of  great 
Extent  over  the  low  Ground;  and  is  very  good  in  Quality, 
with  a  fine  young  Orchard,  the  largest  in  the  Province, 
containing  about  1400  Trees,  of  the  best  grafted  Fruit, 
at  50  Feet  Distances,  which  bore  this  (for  the  first)  Year, 
and  from  which,  when  it  comes  to  Maturity,  there  may  be 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  89 

from  500  to  1000  Barrels  of  Cyder  made  yearly.  There 
is  on  the  Estate  fine  Black  Heart,  May  Duke,  White 
Heart,  Coronation,  and  Bleeding  Heart  Cherries;  Ber- 
gamott,  and  other  Pears;  Holland,  Green  Gage,  and  Or- 
hea  Plumbs;  a  fine  Nursery  of  several  Thousand  Apple 
Trees,  some  of  which  are  fit  to  set  out.  A  good  Farm 
House,  Kitchen,  and  a  very  fine  Dairy,  and  Cyder-House 
built  this  Year,  a  Barn,  with  nine  Barracks  for  Hay  and 
Corn;  a  very  fine  Corn-House,  and  a  large  Grannery;  a 
Negro-House,  Smoak-House,  a  large  Fowl-House,  a 
Smith's  Shop,  a  Coal-House,  a  large  Cow-House,  two 
Horse  Stables,  two  Green  Houses  to  preserve  Cabbage 
and  Roots  in  the  Winter;  a  Pidgeon-House,  well  stock'd; 
and  other  Conveniencies  too  many  to  mention.  There  is 
on  this  Tract,  at  a  Distance  of  less  than  half  a  Mile,  a  good 
House  for  a  Hind  or  Steward,  and  two  other  Tenements, 
that  will  let,  or  accommodate  Servants  that  have  families ; 
and  there  may  (one  Year  with  another)  be  upwards  of 
150  Tuns  of  fine  English  Hay,  Clover  and  Speer  Grass, 
and  upwards  of  500  Tuns  of  coarse  Hay  cut;  all  the  Land 
producing  at  present  this  coarse  Grass,  is  capable  of  being 
made  as  fine  Meadow  as  any  in  the  World,  at  a  very  small 
Expence;  and  is  deem'd  one  of  the  finest  Places  in  Amer- 
ica to  breed  Mules  for  the  West-Indies.  There  is  on  the 
whole  about  300  Acres  of  Woods,  containing  some  fine 
Timber  for  building.  Through  the  Tract  runs  a  fine 
Brook,  on  which  stands  (within  less  than  half  a  Mile  of 
the  Dwelling-House)  a  Grist-Mill,  and  Saw-Mill,  (not 
on  the  Tract)  and  in  the  Brook;  and  also  a  River  on  which 
the  Tract  bounds,  are  plenty  of  Trout  and  other  Fish: 
There  is  also  some  Deer,  Turkeys,  and  plenty  of  wild 
Geese,  Ducks,  Partridges,  Quails,  &c.  on  it  in  the  proper 
Season,  and  at  the  Foot  of  the  Garden  is  a  very  fine  Spring, 
never  dry,  and  an  extreme  good  Place  for  a  Fish-Pond. 


90  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

The  main  Road  66  Feet  Wide,  runs  through  the  Tract, 
not  an  Acre  of  barren  or  poor  Land  on  the  Whole. 

This  Estate  lies  in  the  Heart  of  a  Country,  where  any 
Quantity  of  Cattle  may  be  bought,  at  all  Seasons  of  the 
Year,  at  a  very  moderate  Price;  and  as  there  may  be  some 
Persons  extremely  well  qualified  to  buy,  faten,  and  sell 
Cattle,  who  wou'd  incline  to  rent,  in  case  they  had  a  proper 
Capital  to  carry  on  that  Business  to  Advantage ;  the  Own- 
er proposes  to  let  a  good  Tenant  have  any  Sum  on  Inter- 
est, not  exceeding  1000  1.  giving  good  Security. 

Shou'd  any  Person  incline  to  purchase,  rather  than  rent, 
the  above  Estate,  it  may  be  bought  at  a  reasonable  Price, 
and  any  Term,  not  exceeding  ten  Years,  given  for  Pay- 
ment of  a  Part  or  the  Whole  of  the  Money,  on  allowing 
Interest,  and  giving  good  Security.  The  Title  clear  and 
indisputable,  and  -will  be  warranted  to  the  Purchaser. 
There  is  on  it  now,  the  largest  and  finest  Breed  of  Cattle 
in  America,  imported  from  Holland,  and  as  good  Horses 
as  any  in  the  Province;  all,  or  any  of  which,  with  about 
twenty  Slaves,  bred  to  farming  and  Country  Work, 
(among  which  is  a  good  Blacksmith,  a  Mason,  and  a  Shoe- 
maker,) will  be  sold,  and  Possession  of  the  Whole  imme- 
diately after  given  to  the  Tennant  or  a  Purchaser.  For 
further  Particulars,  enquire  of  John  Berrian,  Esq;  near 
Prince-Town;  Jonathan  Hampton,  and  Abraham  Clark, 
Jun.,  Esq;  near  Elizabeth-Town,  or  the  Owner  in  New- 
York. — The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
855,  March  21,  1768. 

To  be  sold  at  Vendue,  on  Tuesday  the  igth  Day  of  April 
next,  on  the  Premises,  in  New- Jersey,  Bergen  Coun- 
ty, West  of  Cavan,  at  a  Place  called  Pamerpough, 
within  7  Miles  of  New-York,  at  which  Time  and 
Place,  the  Terms  of  Sale  will  be  made  known; 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  9! 

A  Farm  pleasantly  situated  between 
the  Lands  of  Daniel  Van  Winkle,  and 
Jacob    Van    Wagoner,    adjoining    to 
Hudson's  River,  and  runs  to  Newark 
Bay,  containing  upwards  of  an  Hun- 
dred Acres,  most  of  which  are  Mead- 
ow and  Wood  Land,  besides  another 
Lot  of  above  Twenty  Acres  of  Timber  Land  at  Bergen 
Point.     There  is  on  the  Farm  a  good  Stone  House,  with 
two  Rooms  and  Fire-Places  on  a  Floor,  a  Barn,  a  good 
Well,  and  two  Orchards;    and  it  is  very  convenient  for 
Fish,  Oysters,  and  Clams,  the  Sale  is  made  by  Heirs  of 
Barent  Speer,  deceased. 

To  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on 
Monday  the  nth  Day  of  April  next,  on  the  Premises; 

THE  Dwelling  House  of  the  late 
joining,  situate  at  Newark,  in  the 
Col.  Josiah  Ogden,  deceased,  with  a 
good  commodious  kitchen,  a  large  well 
furnished  vault,  a  barn,  stable,  hen- 
house, and  about  one  acre  of  land  ad- 
county  of  Essex  and  province  of  New- Jersey,  upon  the 
river  Pissaick,  about  one  quarter  of  a  mile  from  an  Epis- 
copal church  of  England,  about  three  quarters  of  a  mile 
from  a  Presbyterian  meeting-house,  and  adjoining  to  the 
most  public  landing  in  said  town  of  Newark.1  The  house 
is  built  of  stone,  and  is  in  very  good  repair;  it  consists 
of  eight  rooms,  all  completely  finished,  six  of  them  with 
fire  places,  one  .of  the  other  two  very  large,  and  peculiarly 
well  calculated  for  a  store  room,  the  other  small  and  fit 
only  for  a  bed-room.  The  vendue  will  begin  at  two  o'clock 

i  Near  the  foot  of  Bridge  street. 


92  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

in  the  afternoon;    when  the  terms  of  sale  will  be  made 

known,  by 

DAVTD  OGDEN 
JACOB  OGDEN,  AND 
ISAAC  LONGWORTH. 
Newark,  March  21,  1768. 

— The  Nezu  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1316,  March  24,  1768. 

NEW- YORK,  March  14. 

We  are  assured  the  General  Assembly  of  the  Province 
of  New- Jersey,  are  to  meet  at  Perth- Amboy  the  I2th  of 
April  next,  to  proceed  on  Business;  circular  Letters  hav- 
ing already  been  sent  to  the  Members  for  that  Purpose. 

To  BE  LETT, 

A  PIECE  of  meadow,  on  the  Gloucester  Road,  belonging 
to  ANDREW  ELLIOT,  Esq;  late  in  the  tenure  of  Philip  Ben- 
ezet,  containing  about  10  acres.  For  terms,  apply  to 
CONYNGHAM  and  NESBITT. 

Salem  County,  West  Jersey,  March  14,  1768. 
WHEREAS  a  certain  PHILIP  CUMMINS,  of  Kent  county, 
on  Delaware,  did,  on  or  about  the  middle  of  October,  in 
the  year  1767,  wrongfully  and  deceitfully  obtain  of  me, 
the  subscriber,  a  promissory  note,  for  the  payment  of 
Seven  Pounds,  payable  the  first  day  of  this  instant  March; 
I  therefore  take  this  method  to  request  all  persons  not  to 
take  any  assignment  of  said  note,  as  I  was  much  wronged 
by  said  Cummins,  and  am  determined  not  to  pay  the  same, 
till  compelled  by  law. 

PETER  DUBOIS. 

N.  B.  Part  of  said  money  was  attached  in  my  hands  by 
one  of  said  Cummins's  creditors  in  said  county  of  Salem, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  93 

and  a  jury  of  6  lawful  men  gave  the  cause  in  my  favour, 
they  judging  the  note  was  obtained  as  aforesaid. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  the  SUBSCRIBER, 

A  VALUABLE  tract  of  wood-land,  containing  180  acres, 
remarkably  well  timbered  with  white  oak  timber,  chiefly 
about  1 8  miles  from  William  Cooper's  ferry,  and  about  a 
mile  and  a  half  from  a  landing,  a  mile  from  a  saw-mill, 
and  a  mile  and  a  half  from  a  grist-mill,  lying  near  Repo- 
paw  Creek,  about  a  mile  and  a  half  from  Salem  Road.  The 
land  adjoining  Solomon  Lippincott's  and  situated  in 
Greenwich  township,  county  of  Gloucester,  and  province 
of  West  New- Jersey.  There  are  4  acres  cleared,  a  young 
apple  orchard,  a  quantity  of  inland  swamp,  which  may  be 
made  very  good  meadow,  with  a  little  labour.  Any  per- 
son inclining  to  purchase  the  said  tract  of  land,  may  have 
it  on  paying  half  the  purchase  money  down,  and  one  year 
to  pay  the  remainder,  without  interest,  giving  good  secur- 
ity, if  required.  The  title  indisputable.  For  further  par- 
ticulars, enquire  of  JOHN  STEELMAN,  living  in  Clommell, 
about  2  miles  and  a  half  from  said  tract  of  land. 

N.  B.  There  are  several  places  of  worship  near  the 
same. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2048,  March  24, 
1768. 

RUN  away  from  Caleb  Newbold,  of  Springfield,  in  the 
county  of  Burlington,  and  province  of  West  New- Jersey, 
on  or  about  the  middle  of  June  1766,  a  servant  man,  named 
Aaron  Gibbs,  about  five  feet  seven  or  eight  inches  high, 
well  sett,  much  pitted  with  the  small  pox,  dark  hair,  coun- 
try born,  about  twenty  five  years  old,  understands  how  to 
do  any  farming  business:  Whoever  takes  up,  and  se- 
cures, the  said  servant  in  any  goal  in  this  province,  so  as 
his  master  shall  have  him  again,  shall  have  three  pounds 


94  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  and  if  out  of  the  province 
five  pounds,  paid  by  me, 

CALEB  NEWBOLD. 

The  CENTINEL.      No.  I. 

Humano  capite  cervicem  pictor  equinam 

lunger e  si  velit — ut  turpitur  atrum 

Desinat  in  piscem  mulicr  formosa.  superne — 

Risum  teneatis.    Hor.  Ar.  Poet. 

DR.  CHANDLER'S  Appeal  to  the  Public  in  behalf  of  the 
Church  of  England  in  America,  which  from  his  own  Ac- 
count, seems  rather  to  be  the  united  Effort  of  all  the 
CLERGY  in  New-York  and  New  Jersey,  perfected  by  the 
kind  Assistance  of  the  CLERGY  from  the  neighbouring 
Provinces,  may  by  this  Time  be  supposed  to  have  circu- 
lated pretty  generally.  And  as  the  Season  advances,  when 
we  presume  these  CLERGY  are  again  to  meet  in  voluntary 
Convention,  this  may  be  the  proper  Time  to  propose  a 
few  Questions  for  their  or  if  the  Dr.  pleases  for  his  Con- 
sideration. The  performance  seems  replete  with  bold  ex- 
travagant assertions  of  facts,  many  of  which  have  no  foun- 
dation in  truth ;  it  is  greatly  deficient  in  Christian  Charity, 
tho'  not  deficient  in  low  craft,  and  seems  dangerous  to  the 
civil  and  religious  Liberties  of  the  Colonies  in  America. 
But  I  perceive  that  if  any  objections  be  made  to  his  Plan, 
our  new  Doctor  from  a  persuasion  already  formed,  is  pre- 
pared to  ascribe  them,  rather  to  "the  dexterity  and  ill  will 
of  the  inventors  than"  to  "the  real  fears  and  uneasiness  of 
the  inhabitants."  (P.  112)  Nay  he  is  so  bold,  as  to  assert 
that  "every  opposition  to  such  plan"  as  he 'has  proposed, 
"has  the  nature  of  persecution  and  deserves  the  name." 
(82)  Again  he  says,  "if  no  objections  shall  be  offered,  it 
will  be  taken  for  granted  that  all  parties  acquiesce  and  are 
satisfied."  (2)  Thus  on  the  one  hand,  silence  is  to  be 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  95 

construed  into  assent  and  approbation,  and  on  the  other 
hand,  if  we  object  to,  or  oppose  his  plan,  we  are  to  be  stig- 
matized as  persecutors  and  the  worst  of  mankind.  How- 
ever as  he  seems  to  admit  a  possibility  that  some  "objec- 
tions may  continue,  which  -may  be  thought  to  deserve  no- 
tice" and  is  pleased  to  erect  an  imaginary  tribunal,  and  to 
invite  the  objectors  "to  propose  them  that  they  may  be  de- 
bated before}  that  tribunal''  it  seems  hard  to  oblige  those, 
who  cannot  altogether  approve  his  plan,  to  yield  the  case 
untried,  or  to  bear  the  names  of  "malicious,  "intolerant, 
"Persecutors,  "enemies  to  all  religion  "and  the  church, 
"hot  headed  writers,  "pragmatical  enthusiasts,"  &c.  nay 
even  to  have  their  loyalty  called  in  question. 

I  must  confess  there  are  some  objections  to  this  plan, 
that  "continue"  with  me,  and  which,  to  as  many  as  I  have 
mentioned  them,  seem  to  "deserve  notice"  but  before  I 
propose  them  to  be  debated  before  the  "tribunal  of  the 
public,"  I  should  be  glad  the  Doctor  would  deign  to  ex- 
plain some  of  his  terms,  and  give  us  farther  information 
on  some  points,  that  I  shall  propose. 

He  begins  with  informing  us  "that  application  has  been 
made  to  our  SUPERIORS,  by  the  Clergy  of  several  of  the 
Colonies,  requesting  one  or  more  Bishops  to  be  sent  to 
America;"  he  complains  of  "unprecedented  hardships," 
and  "intolerable  grievances,"  suffered  by  the  "Church" 
the  "American  Church"  the  "Church  of  England  in  Amer- 
ica" for  want  of  "an  American  Episcopate"  and  upon  this 
founds  his  Appeal  to  the  Public. 

We  should  be  obliged  to  the  Doctor,  if  he  would  inform 
us  in  plain  terms,  who  are  these  superiors  to  whom  the 
Clergy  have  applied;  by  whom  these  Bishops  are  to  be 
sent ;  by  what  authority  this  American  Episcopate  is  to  be 
established;  or  who  are  the  authors  of  these  intolerable 
grievances  and  unprecedented  hardships?  that  we  may  the 
better  judge,  whether  the  apprehensions  on  account  of  our 


96  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

civil  Liberties,  which  this  avowed  application  has  raised  in 
the  minds  of  many  people,  be  well  or  ill  founded.     As  he 
has  appealed  to  the  public,  would  it  not  be  proper  for  him 
to  inform  us,  against  whom  he  appeals  ?    Whether  against 
the  King  his  Ministers  and  the  British  Parliament,  for  not 
redressing  those  grievances,  of  which  he  complains,  and 
for  not  establishing  Episcopacy  in  America,  as  he  seems 
to  think  they  ought  to  have  done?    Or  whether  the  Ap- 
peal is  made  against  those,  who,  thro'  fear  of  an  invasion 
and  infringement  of  their  civil  and  religious  Liberties, 
think  it  their  duty  to  oppose  such  an  establishment?     If 
against  the  former,  the  court  must  indeed  be  august  and 
respectable,  which  he  has  constituted  to  take  cognizance 
of  our  Sovereign  and  the  British  Parliament.     If  against 
the  latter,  as  by  the  rules  of  all  well  established  courts, 
both  plaintiffs  and  defendants  are  excluded  from  judging 
in  their  own  cause,  I  fancy  there  will  be  few  in  America 
to  sit  in  judgment.    For  let  the  Doctor  flatter  as  much  as 
he  pleases,  if  ever  the  attempt  be  made,  he  will  find  that 
the  prejudices  and  objections  of  most  of  our  Colonies  are 
too  deeply  rooted  and  too  well  founded,  for  them  ever  to 
submit  quietly  to  an  American   Episcopate,   established 
over  them  even  by  act  of  Parliament;    this  would  be  to 
destroy  their  charters,  laws,  and  their  very  constitutions; 
and  it  will  be  well  if  the  Doctor  and  his  associates  are  not 
considered  as  abettors  of  Mr.  Greenville  and  those  Ene- 
mies of  America,  who  are  exerting  their  utmost  endeav- 
ours to  strip  us  of  our  most  sacred,  invaluable  and  inherent 
Rights;   to  reduce  us  to  the  state  of  slaves;   and  to  tax  us 
by  laws,  to  which  we  never  have  assented,  nor  can  assent. 
We  would  also  ask  the  Doctor,  why  is  the  application 
made  for  a  Bishop  at  this  particular  time  when  the  liberties 
of  America  are  at  stake  ?    Why  are  some  insinuations  of 
disloyalty  thrown  out  against  his  American   Brethren? 
For  what  are  the  tendency  of  his  political  reasons,  but  to 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  97 

inflame  the  jealousy  of  the  people  of  Great-Britain  ?  Can 
there  be  no  Bishops  without  establishments ;  no  ordination 
without  act  of  Parliament?  Must  this  be  a  new  and  a 
primitive,  or  a  part  of  the  English  Episcopate. 

The  claims  of  the  Doctor,  without  an  establishment, 
notwithstanding  all  his  seeming  modesty  and  candour,  are 
too  great,  not  to  awaken  jealousies  in  the  minds  of  free 
born  Americans,  if  none  had  been  conceived  there  before. 

The  "Church"  the  American  Church,  "the  Church  of 
England  in  America,"  are  the  names  by  which  he  affects 
to  distinguish  that  denomination  of  Christians,  to  which 
he  belongs.    I  wish  the  Doctor  would  please  to  define  his 
terms,  and  tell  us  what  he  means  by  Church,  and  why  that 
name  should  be  applied  to  English  Episcopalians  only. 
Are  not  the  Lutheran  and  Calvinist  Churches,  are  not  the 
Congregational,  Consociated  and  Presbyterian  Churches; 
are  not  the  Baptist,  the  Quaker  and  all  other  Churches  in 
America,  of,  what  denomination  soever  they  be,  members 
of  Christ's  Catholic  Church,  if  they  profess  faith  in  Christ 
and  hold  the  great  essentials  of  Christianity  ?    Or  does  he 
mean  to  lay  such  a  stress  on  unbroken  succession,  and  on 
Episcopacy  as  by  law  established  in  England,  as  to  make 
these  essential  to  the  being  of  a  Church?    His  words  in- 
deed seem  to  import  as  much,  where  he  says,  "Men  may 
ridicule  the  notion  of  uninterrupted  succession  as  they 
please"  but  "if  the  succession  be  once  broken  and  the  pow- 
ers oft  ordination  once  lost,  not  all  the  men  on  earth,  not 
all  the  angels  in  heaven,  without  an  immediate  commission 
from  Christ,  can  restore  it.    It  is  as  great  an  absurdity  for 
a  man  to  preach  without  being  properly  sent,  as  it  is  to 
hear  without  a  preacher,  or  to  believe  in  him  of  whom'  they 
have  never  heard."     This  may  be  the  Doctor's  private 
opinion  borrowed  from  the  Non jurors  and  other  disturb- 
ers of  the  Church  and  State  during  the  reigns  of  King 
William,  Queen  Ann  and  King  George  the  first,  but  surely 


98  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

it  is  not  the  doctrine'  of  the  Church  of  England :  it  has 
long  since  been  disclaimed  by  some  of  its  greatest  Doctors 
and  ablest  Divines.  However,  I  should  be  glad  the  Doc- 
tor would  explain  himself  further,  and  try  to  reconcile 
these  high  notions  with  Christian  Charity,  and  with  the 
validity  of  ordination  in  the  foreign  Protestant  Churches, 
or  of  those  who  make  no  pretence  to  an  unbroken  succes- 
sion. The  candour  of  his  sentiments  and  (if  we  may  be- 
lieve him)  of  the  doctrine  and  belief  of  the  Church  of  Eng- 
land, with  regard  to  the  government  of  those  Churches  in 
America,  which  are  not  Episcopal,  is  worthy  of  notice. 
"If,  says  he,  according  to  the  doctrine  and  belief  of  the 
Church  of  England,  none  have  a  right  to  govern  the 
Church  but  Bishops,  then  the  American  Church  must  be 
without  government.  (27)  But  lest  we  may  have  mis- 
understood him,  we  desire  he  may  tell  us,  whether  he 
means  that  the  Episcopal  Christians  are  the  only  Church 
in  America,  and  consequently  excludes  all  other  Churches 
who  'want  Bishops,  from  being  members  of  the  American 
Church;  or  whether  he  would  assert  that  all  others  are 
without  order  and  government  for  want  of  Bishops,  and 
therefore  undeserving  the  name  of  Churches. 

The  "Church  of  England  in  America''  which  he  often 
repeats,  is  a  new  expression,  unwarranted  by  scripture,  not 
known  in  law,  and  hardly  intelligible  in  language,  and 
therefore  wants  explanation.  We  read  in  scripture  of  the 
Church  of  Antioch,  of  Corinth,  and  of  Rome ;  and  of  the 
Churches  in  Asia  and  Judea;  but  we  no  where  read  of 
the  Church  of  Jerusalem  in  Rome,  or  of  the  Church  of 
Judea  in  Europe  or  Asia ;  in  like  manner,  we  hear  of  the 
Church  of  England,  the  Church  of  Ireland,  and  the  Church 
of  Scotland;  but  the  Church  of  England  in  America  is  a 
new  mode  of  expression :  Yet  by  this  new  fangled  term, 
the  Doctor  and  other  Missionaries  affect  to  distinguish 
themselves  and  their  followers,  while  with  an  air  of  arro- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  99 

gance  and  superciliousness,  they  call  other  denominations 
of  Christians,  Dissenters. 

We  apprehend  this  is  not  a  mere  impropriety  of  speech 
adopted  by  a  man  who  seems  not  to  be  one  of  the  most 
correct  writers,  but  a  phrase  artfully  introduced  with  a 
sinister  design. 

The  Doctor  cannot  have  read  so  little  either  of  civil  or 
ecclesiastical  history,  or  be  so  very  little  acquainted  with 
mankind  as  not  to  know  the  magic  of  words,  and  the  blind 
devotion  paid  to  names  and  sounds.  The  words  Pope  and 
Priest  carry  great  reverence  with  them  in  some  countries, 
and  terrible  confusions  and  animosities  have  been  raised 
in  other  countries  by  the  words  Church,  Clergy,  divine 
right,  uninterrupted  succession,  indelible  character,  and 
such  like  undefined  nonsense;  we  hope  the  like  game  will 
never  be  played  in  America. 

The  "national  religion"  is  another  phrase  of  the  Doc- 
tor's, wherewith  he  graces  the  peculiar  tenets  of  his 
Church;  with  what  view  he  uses  it,  we  may  easily  guess 
from  the  privileges  he  has  annexed  to  it,  and  the  doctrine 
he  teaches  and  confirms  with  an  "indeed"  concerning  it. 
Those,  says  he,  "who  dissent  from  the  National  Religion, 
have,  indeed,  no  natural  right  to  any  degree  of  civil  or  mil- 
itary power."  (109)  As  the  Doctor  in  another  place  de- 
clares, that  "nothing  has  been  asserted  in  the  course  of  his 
work,  but  what  the  author  believes,  upon  good  evidence, 
to  be  true."  We  hope  he  will  produce  his  evidence  to  prove 
this  doctrine,  which  sounds  strange  in  an  American  ear. 
In  the  mean  time,  we  would  ask  him,  why  might  not  Chris- 
tianity have  been  allowed  the  honour  of  being  called  the 
national  religion?  Or  why  is  Episcopacy  alone  honoured 
with  that  name  ?  Is  it  because  it  is  established  by  law  in 
England?  Is  not  Presbytery  also  established  by  law? 
And  was  it  not  established  in  1707,  a  more  enlightened 
age  surely  than  that  in  'which  Episcopacy  was  established 


IOO  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [ 

at  the  reformation?  If  the  one  is  a  national  church,  be- 
cause established  in  England,  why.  not  the  other,  because 
established  in  Scotland  ?  But  what  is  this  to  us  in  Amer- 
ica ?  Because  these  forms  are  established  in  Great  Britain, 
must  they  also  be  established  here  ?  Many  thousands  fled 
to  the  wilds  of  America  from  Episcopal  tyranny  and  perse- 
cution, and  to  enjoy  the  free  exercise  of  religion  in  a  way 
most  agreeable  to  their  consciences,  (and  as  they  con- 
ceived) to  scripture  and  reason;  established  colonies, 
formed  governments,  framed  laws  and  founded  Churches ; 
and  must  all  these  be  termed  dissenters,  because  the  doc- 
tor and  they  differ?  Or  have  they  "no  natural  right  to 
any  degree  of  civil  and  military  power,"  because  they  are 
not  of  the  national  religion.  That  is.  if  we  believe  the 
Doctor,  the  religion  which  he,  and  "the  Clergy  of  the  sev- 
eral colonies  (meaning  the  missionaries)  profess?" 

It  is  not  doubted  but  every  man  who  wishes  to  be  free 
will,  by  all  lawful  ways  in  his  power,  oppose  the  establish- 
ment of  any  one  denomination  in  America,  the  preventing 
which  is  the  only  means  of  securing  their  natural  rights, 
to  all  those  at  least  who  may  differ  from  that  denomina- 
tion. The  Doctor  seems  sensible  that  the  opposition  to 
these  lordly  prelates,  will  not  wholly  rest  with  those  whom 
he  terms  Dissenters,  that  their  encroachments  in  civil  mat- 
ters are  disagreeable  to  very  many  who  admit  their  author- 
ity in  the  Church;  he  therefore  solemnly  assures  us,  that 
"the  Bishops"  he  desires,  "shall  not  interfere  with  the  prop- 
erty or  privileges,  whether  civil  or  religious  of  Churchmen 

or  Dissenters" "that  they  shall  only  ordain  and  govern 

the  Clergy,  and  administer  confirmation  to  those  who  shall 
desire  it."  But  when  he  comes  to  explain  himself  farther. 
he  cautiously  intersperses  the  words,  at  "  present"  now," 
and  such  qualifying  expressions  as  leave  the  Bishops  when 
once  established,  a  full  liberty  to  revive  every  claim  and 
privilege  they  have  ever  made  or  enjoyed.  Even  with  re- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  IOI 

gards  to  Tithes  (105)  while  he  is  obviating  objections 
that  might  be  raised  on  account  of  them,  he  expresses  him- 
self with  such  cautious  ambiguity,  as  to  leave  it  doubtful 
whether  he  does  not  mean  that  a  Bishop  established  in 
America  may  claim  and  recover  them  by  the  laws  of  Eng- 
land. Nay  such  Ideas  of  Grandeur  and  Magnificence  has 
the  Doctor  united  with  the  word  Bishop,  that  while  he  is 
pleading  for  such  as  he  calls  primitive  Bishops,  he  hints 
at  lordly  revenues;  he  lets  us  know  a  committee  was  ex- 
traordinarily appointed  to  find  out  ways  and  means  for 
the  maintenance  and  support  of  Bishops  in  America;  (49) 
that  a  fund  has  been  established  for  that  particular  pur- 
pose for  more  than  half  a  century  past;"  that  many  thou- 
sand pounds  have  been  contributed  to  increase  this  fund. 
(108)  But,  "if  this  stock  is  not  sufficient  for  the  support 
of  a  proper  Episcopate  in  America,"  "should  a  general  tax 
be  laid  on  the  country  and  thereby  a  sum  raised  sufficient 
for  the  purpose"  "this  would  be  no  mighty  hardship  on 
the  country ;})  and  he  who  would  think  much  of  paying  it, 
deserves  not  to  be  considered  in  the  light  of  a  good  sub- 
ject. (107)  That  hereafter  they  may  be  invested  with 
some  degree  of  civil  power  worthy  their  acceptance,  (no) 
In  short,  hints,  that  legislative  and  executive  powers  may 
both  be  placed  in  their  hands,  (ibidem)  And  with  all 
these  princely  revenues,  with  all  this  accession  of  power, 
what  are  they  to  do?  Only  to  ordain  and  govern  the 
Clergy?  No:  They  are  "to  defend  and  protect  both  the 
Clergy  and  Laity."  These  things  are  so  unlike  the  ap- 
pearance of  a  primitive  Bishop,  that  we  must  say,  that 
though  "at  present"  we  hear  the  voice  of  Jacob,  we  see 
and  may  "hereafter  feel  the  rough  and  hairy  hands  of 
Esau. 

One  thing  more  I  would  beg  to  know  from  the  Doctor; 
what  assurances  (besides  his  own,  which  are  too  weak  to 
be  relied  on  in  so  momentous  an  affair)  are  we  to  have 


IO2  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

that  Bishops  will  be  sent  over  with  such  limited  powers? 
attempts  are  made  upon  American  liberty  from  a  quarter 
where  it  ought  not  to  be  expected.  A  temper  is  shewn  by 
some  leading  prelates  even  now  in  England,  that  will  not 
suffer  us  to  place  a  confidence  in  them.  One  of  them  at 
the  head  of  the  society  for  propagating  the  gospel  was  not 
ashamed  to  oppose  a  plan  for  the  conversion  of  the  Indi- 
ans, because  concerted  by  a  denomination  of  Christians 
who  "followed  not  with  him."  Another  of  them  lately 
attended  the  board  of  trade  to  prevent  the  grant  of  a  char- 
ter to  the  Presbyterian  Church  in  New- York. 

But  suppose  these  Bishops  sent  over  with  these  limitted 
powers,  is  there  any  probability  that  they  will  be  content 
with  them  ?  can  we  suppose  that  the  Clergy  of  a  Society, 
which  thinks  itself  peculiarly  entitled  to  national  favour, 
and  asserts  itself  to  be  so  essentially  connected  with  the 
state,  will,  if  once  established  ever  give  ease  or  peace  to 
other  Churches  in  America,  whom  they  now  treat  as  Dis- 
senters, until  they  have  a  plenary  possession  of  every  priv- 
ilege enjoyed  by  the  Church  in  England  by  law  estab- 
lished? .  With  Bishops  at  their  head,  will  not  the  cry  be 
as  loud,  if  they  have  not  ecclesiastical  courts,  for  discip- 
line and  to  harrass  their  neighbours?  A  Bishop  without 
a  court,  is  as  unparalleled  as  any  hardship  complained  of  ? 
Again  must  not  the  Clergy  have  a  maintenance?  The 
society  for  propagating  the  gospel  is  not  able  to  provide 
for  all  that  may  be  ordained;  the  Episcopal  congrega- 
tions cannot  maintain  them;  must  they  then  starve  in 
America  ?  When  in  England  they  have  a  legal  right  to 
the  tithes?  Will  not  the  cry  at  last  be,  nay  does  not  the 
Doctor  almost  make  it  already,  that  they  alone  have  a 
right  to  all  places  of  power  and  profit  in  the  colonies  as 
well  as  in  England  and  Ireland,  because  the  most  friendly 
to  monarchy? 

We  hope  the  Doctor  will  explain  himself  fully,  and  re- 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  10$ 

solve  the  doubts  and  queries  we  have  here  proposed.  On 
some  other  occasion  we  may  enter  the  lists  and  examine 
his  divine  right  of  diocesan  Episcopacy;  his  unbroken 
succession;  the  connection  between  natural  rights,  and  a 
national  religion ;  his  Doctrine  of  tithes ;  the  numbers  of 
his  denomination  and  their  unparalleled  sufferings  in 
America,  &c.  &C.1  N. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1320,  March  24, 
1768. 

THE  AMERICAN  WHIG.     [No.  III.] 
And  of  some  have  Compassion,  making  a  difference. 

Apostle  JUDE, 

THE  first  settlers  of  the  Northern  colonies  fled  from  the 
cruel  persecution  of  the  Church  of  England  to  this  coun- 
try, which  then  was  an  uncultivated  wilderness.  The  In- 
dians soon  became  jealous  of  the  new  settlers,  and  gave 
them  all  the  disturbance  in  their  power.  But  those  brave 
sons  of  religion  and  liberty,  chose  rather  to  run  the  risque 
of  the  rage  and  malice  of  the  Indian  savages,  than  of  the 
perfidious  and  persecuting  bishops.  They  continued  to 
settle  the  country,  and  God,  in  whom  they  trusted,  ap- 
peared for  their  defence,  and  drove  out  the  heathens  from 
before  them. 

As  America  is  a  new  country,  and  the  settlers  generally 
poor,  they  are  obliged  to  be  very  laborious,  in  order  to 
procure  a  tolerable  subsistence  for  themselves  and  fami- 
lies. They  have  ever  been,  and  still  are,  too  much  engaged 
in  business,  to  get  acquainted  with  the  parties  and  contro- 
versies that  continued  in  the  mother-country,  and  partic- 
ularly in  the  Church  of  England;  especially  as  they  hoped, 
that  their  great  enemies  the  diocesan  bishops,  would  be 

i  The  foregoing  article,  and  those  that 'follow,  to  p.  120,  inclusive,  are 
given  as  specimens  of  the  arguments  used  in  this  controversy.  They 
lost  in  temper  and  somewhat  in  cogency  as  the  discussion  proceeded. 


104  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

contented,  since  they  had  in  effect  procured  them  to  be 
banished  from  the  land  of  their  nativity.  Indeed,  we 
could  not  but  hope,  they  would  have  suffered  us  to  live 
in  peace  in  these  remote  parts  of  the  earth;  and  that  the 
vast  Atlantic  ocean  would  have  served  for  a  partition  be- 
tween us  to  all  generations.  But  since  it  appears,  that 
their  spiritual  lordships  are  invited  to  follow  us,  even  into 
these  distant  corners  of  the  earth,  it  is  becoming  neces- 
sary to  consider,  with  some  degree  of  attention,  the  par- 
ties which  compose  the  Church  of  England.  This  is  re- 
quisite, to  shew  what  little  regard  is  to  be  paid  to  those 
ignorant  zealots,  who  assert  that  there  are  no  parties 
among  them,  in  order  that  due  justice  may  be  done  to 
their  respective  characters;  and  that  it  may  be  clearly 
known  who  are  the  persons  we  intend  to  censure.  For  as 
there  are  many  worthy  men  belonging  to  that  commu- 
nion, equally  exposed  with  the  wise  and  virtuous  of  every 
other  denomination  to  the  pestilent  project  in  embryo,  I 
mean  the  design  of  importing  a  cargo  of  Bishops,  it  is  not 
our  intention  to  give  them  any  offence. 

The  reformation  was  begun  in  England  by  Henry  the 
VHIth,  and  that  from  no  very  religious  motive.  Since 
the  Pope  refused  to  grant  him  liberty  to  marry,  he  as- 
sumed to  himself  the  same  supremacy  in  England,  which 
the  Bishop  of  Rome  had  usurped  over  the  Church  and 
consciences  of  men.  And  he  carried  this  power  so  exceed- 
ing high,  that  his  subjects  were  forced  to  comply  with  his 
injunctions,  or  be  ruined.  The  consequence  was,  that 
while  a  few  embraced  the  reformation  out  of  conscience, 
multitudes  submitted  merely  to  save  their  estates,  and 
avoid  persecution.  Hence,  when  Queen  Mary  commanded 
them  to  return  to  popery,  they  very  generally  complied. 
Nor  is  there  any  reason  to  think  they  were,  for  the  most 
part,  more  sincere  in  their  re-conversion  to  protestantism, 
at  the  command  of  Queen  Elisabeth.  And  thus  the  na- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  IO$ 

tional  Church  of  England  was  erected;    such  were  the 
greater  part  of  her  clergy  and  laity. 

This  clearly  shews  us  the  origin  of  two  famous  parties, 
viz.  High-Church  and  Low-Church,  as  they  are  termed 
in  England.  From  the  beginning  of  the  reformation,  it 
being  effected  so  much  by  force,  many  who  were  really 
papists  in  their  hearts,  yielded  to  the  times,  and  conformed 
out  of  self-interest.  Such  were  always  strongly  inclined 
to  prevent  every  farther  step  of  reformation;  and  chose 
rather  again,  to  coalesce  with  the  Church  of  Rome.  Such 
were  always  mighty  sticklers  for  pomp  in  religious  wor- 
ship; for  rites  and  ceremonies, 'and  the  uninterrupted  line 
of  succession:  And  such,  in  a  word,  have  always  been 
the  ringleaders  in  persecuting  all,  who,  from  a  principle 
of  religion  and  conscience,  could  not  adopt  their  measures. 
For  having  themselves  no  idea  about  tenderness  of  con- 
science, they  would  make  no  allowance  for  others.  When 
the  house  of  Stuart  was  called  to  the  throne  of  England, 
and  proved,  as  is  well  known  by  woful  experience,  a  weak 
and  tyrannical  race  of  princes,  who  meditated  utterly  to 
destroy  the  liberties  of  the  nation;  the  high  Churchmen 
joined  heartily  with  them,  and  endeavored  to  support  all 
their  measures.  The  Bishops  and  Clergy  intoxicated 
those  monarchs  with  the  most  fulsome  flattery,  assuring 

ithem,  that  as  viceregents  of  God,  they  were  not  account- 
able to  men,  and  that  subjects  must  obey  on  pain  of  dam- 
nation :  The  kings  in  return  promoted  those  sycophants 
to  great  riches  and  dignity,  and  permitted  them  to  gratify 
their  cruel  and  popish  spirit,  by  persecuting  their  fellow 
protestants.  And  thus  they  continued  to  ravage  and  de- 
stroy the  nation,  till  God,  in  his  merciful  providence,  put 
an  end  to  their  tyranny,  by  King  William  the  Hid.  of 
glorious  memory.  But  have  they  been  quiet  and  submis- 
sive since  the  happy  revolution?  No,  they  greatly  dis- 
turbed the  peace  and  comfort  of  that  excellent  prince,  by 


106  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

many  plots  and  conspiracies  :  And  they  had  accomplished 
the  extirpation  of  the  national  liberty  in  the  reign  of  Queen 
Anne,  had  not  the  Almighty  graciously  interfered,  and 
again  blasted  their  execrable  designs. 

The  same  restless  party  raised  rebellions  in  the  reigns 
of  George  the  first  and  second,  and  involved  the  nation  in 

blood  and  slaughter. And  who  are  now  so  earnestly 

desirous  of  having  Bishops  introduced  into  the  colonies, 
to  lord  it  over  them-?  Who  indeed  but  the  High  Church- 
men? Many  of  the  American  Missionaries  are  High 
Churchmen;  since  they  cannot  on  any  other  consistent 
plan,  justify  their  conduct  in  gathering  proselytes  from 
other  communions.  They  are  the  true,  if  not  the  only, 
descendants  and  approvers  of  Arch-Bishop  Laud's  prin- 
ciples and  measures. 

The  other  party  is  that  which  is  commonly  known  by 
the  name  of  Low  Churchmen,  and  may  be  thus  character- 
ized. They  embraced  the  reformation  from  conscience, 
and  have  always  been  disposed  to  carry  it  farther;  lament- 
ing the  unhappy  deficiencies  of  the  Church  of  England; 
the  relicks  of  popery;  and  the  superstitious  rites  and  cer- 
emonies still  retained.  They  have  ever  been  favourable 
to  the  protestant  Dissenters;  and  firmly  attached  to  the 
civil  liberties  of  their  country;  to  the  revolution,  and  the 
illustrious  house  of  Hanover;  but  avowed  enemies  to 
popery  slavery,  and  arbitrary  power.  These  do  not  desire 
to  impose  diocesan  Bishops  to  undermine  our  rights  and 
privileges.  Nor  do  the  Low  Churchmen  in  the  colonies, 
wish  for  the  residence  of  those  ecclesiastic  Lords  amongst 
us.  With  this  part,  which  is  the  worthy  part  of  the  Church 
of  England,  we  have  no  controversy.  They  are  generally 
men  of  amiable  characters;  and  heartily  concurred  in 
every  lawful  and  decent  measure,  in  opposing  the  late 
stamp-act.  They  are  sincere  friends  to  their  country; 
and  pity  it  is,  that  the  Missionaries  do  not  learn  modera- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 07 

tion  and  candour  from  them ;  nor  pay  more  regard  to  their 
advice  and  example.  Then  should  we  not  be  perpetually 
stunned  with  the  Church  is  in  danger,  the  Church  is  in 
danger;  nor  with  the  great  importance  and  necessity  of 
rites  and  ceremonies;  nor  the  introduction  of  Bishops 
into  the  American  plantations. — : — Whenever  therefore, 
in  the  course  of  these  papers,  I  shall  say  any  thing  respect- 
ing the  Episcopal  Clergy  or  laity,  that  appears  harsh  or 
invidious,  I  would  always  be  understood  as  aiming  at  the 
High  Church  party,  the  restless  and  implacable  enemies 
of  our  liberty  civil  and  sacred.  R. 

—The  New,  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1317,  March  28,  1768. 

A  WHIP  FOR  THE  AMERICAN  WHIG. 

By  TIMOTHY  TICKLE,  ESQR.  [No.  I. 

Think  on  their  Rapine,  Falshood,  Cruelty, 
And  that  what  once  they  were,  they  still  would  be. 

DRYDEN. 

WHEN  a  writer  publickly  attacks  men  of  good  character, 
with  virulence,  and  endeavors  by  sophistry,  to  set  truths, 
which  are  held  sacred  by  many  sincere  Christians,  in  a  dis- 
advantageous light;  it  may  be  proper  to  inquire  into  his 
temper  and  character,  and  the  motives  -which  set  him  to 
work. 

These  circumstances,  I  confess,  do  not  much  affect  the 
intrinsic  value  of  any  literary  composition:  But  if  this 
latter  has  a  pernicious  tendency — either  to  sow  dissentions, 
or  raise  prejudices  among  honest  men — to  unhinge  reli- 
gion, or  unsettle  any  of  its  principles :  The  shewing  what 
quarter  it  comes  from,  will  often  go  a  good  way  to  confute 
it. 

Thus— if  a  man  of  unmeaning  phyz,  should  think  proper 
to  despise  every  animated  countenance, — or,  if  a  man  of 
rueful  length  of  face,  should  take  it  into  his  head  to  de- 
claim against  round  faces,  and  insist  that  there  is  no  come- 


108  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

liness  in  any  but  such  as  have  the  same  degree  of  longitude 
with  his  own,  reviling  all  who  dissented  in  opinion  from 
him — If  a  libertine  should  write  against  religion,  and  try 
to  persuade  people  to  throw  off  all  concern  about  it; — if 
a  busy  factor  in  dissention,  who  has  long  been  a  hackneyed 
journeyman  in  defamation,  should  begin  to  scatter  his  poi- 
son, in  order  to  set  well-meaning  people  together  by  the 
ears;  all  who  know  these  circumstances,  would  immedi- 
ately be  on  their  guard :  A  knowledge  of  them  would 
serve  as  an  antidote  against  the  mischief  which  artful  soph- 
istry might  otherwise  produce. 

Dr.  Chandler,  and  his  Appeal  to  the  Public,  in  behalf  of 
the  Church  of  England  in  America,  have  lately  been  at- 
tacked with  great  indecency  and  fury,  by  the  American 
Whig.  Now  it  happens  that  this  attack  comes  from  an 
ambitious,  disappointed  faction,  the  members  of  which  are 
well  known  to  have  been  always  enemies  to  the  Church  of 
England ;  who  have  wantonly  endeavoured  to  revile  it,— 
to  ridicule  many  of  those  truths  which  its  members  hold 
sacred, — and  'who  make  religion  a  political  engine  to  ac- 
complish their  designs;  The  unprejudiced  reader,  upon 
knowing  this,  will  treat  it  with  that  neglect  and  contempt 
it  deserves. 

To  check  the  insolence  of  this  faction,  is  now  become 
necessary  for  many  reasons.  It  is  high  time  for  the  mem- 
bers of  the  Churchof  England,  whose  lenity  has  been  much 
and  often  abused  by  them,  to  vindicate  themselves  from 
the  false  aspersions  of  these  enemies  to  peace;  and  admin- 
ister some*  wholesome  discipline  to  the  author,  or  authors 
of  the  American  Whig; — which  paper  is  to  be  the  future 
vehicle  of  their  malice.  No.  I.  is  stuffed  with  low,  spuri- 
ous witticisms,  misrepresentations,  scurrility,  buffoonery, 
falshood,  abuse,  and  slander.  But  to  pass  by  all  these, 
the  author  deserves  flagellation  for  his  blunders,  with 
which  this  piece  is  plentifully  begrimed.  Take  the  follow- 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 09 

ing*  sample  of  these,  gentle  reader,  for  the  present,  which 
I  beg  you  would  carefully  observe.  He  says,  the  Appeal 
'"'so  naturally  counterfeits  the  voice  of  a  sheep,  that  it  is 
not  every  reader  who  will  discriminate  it  from  that  of  a 
wolf."  As  much  as  to  say, — it  sings  so  like  a  Nightingale 
that  you  can  scarce  distinguish  its  voice  from  that  of  a 
hoarse  croaking  Raven.  Or,  a  thing  is  so  like  an  egg,  that 
you  can  scarce  distinguish  it  from  an  oyster.  This  is  the 
mighty  man  who  is  to  adjust  with  precision  the  limits  of 
religious  Liberty,  and  defend  it  from  all  encroachment! 
And  great  things,  no  doubt,  are  to  be  expected  from  him. 
What  were  the  motives  of  the  present  attack  on  the 
Appeal?  Not  any  thing  demanded  in  the  Appeal  itself, 
nor  the  manner  in  which  it  is  executed.  It  is  written  with 
great  moderation,  and  asks  nothing  but  what  every  de- 
nomination of  Christians  has  a  right  to,  and  actually  en- 
joys in  America,  the  Church  of  England  only  excepted; — 
namely,  the  liberty  of  having  the  institutions  of  our 
Church,  with  its  forms  of  discipline  and  government,  to 
\\hich  a  Bishop,  or  Bishops,  are  essentially  necessary. 
Yet  still  with  this  restriction, — "That  the  Bishops  to  be 
"sent  to  America,  shall  have  no  authority,  but  purely  of  a 
"spiritual  and  ecclesiastical  nature,  such  as  is  derived  alto- 
gether from  the  Church,  and  not  from  the  state.  That  his 
"authority  shall  operate  only  upon  the  Clergy  of  the 
"Church,  and  not  upon  the  Laity,  or  Dissenters  of  any 
"Denomination.  That  the  Bishops  shall  not  interfere  with 
"the  property  or  privileges,  whether  civil  or  religious,  of 
"Churchmen  or  Dissenters.  That,  in  particular,  they  shall 
"have  no  concern  with  the  probate  of  wills,  letters  of 
"guardianship,  and  administration,  or  marriage  licenses, 
"nor  be  judges  of  any  cases  relating  thereto.  But  that 
"they  shall  only  exercise  the  original  powers  of  their  of- 
"fice,  namely,  ordain  and  govern  the  Clergy,  and  admin - 
"ister  Confirmation  to  those  who  shall  desire  it."  This 


I  IO  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

is  the  whole  of  what  is  desired  by  the  Appeal;  nor  does 
the  warmest  advocates  for  American  Bishops  even  wish 
for  more.* 

The  American  Whig  himself,  acknowledges  that  the 
Appeal  "asks  nothing  but  what  is  highly  reasonable."  And 
the  supposed  author  of  this  Numb,  with  others  of  his  fra- 
ternity, have  frequently  owned  it  was  just  and  reasonable, 
that  the  Church  of  England,  in  America,  should  have 
Bishops  on  these  terms ;  nor  does  it  appear  that  there  was 
any  intention,  until  very  lately,  of  writing  against  it  in 
this  place. 

What  could  occasion  this  change  of  sentiment, — this 
sudden  attack  on  the  Appeal  ?  All  these  doleful  apprehen- 
sions, as  if  it  were  replete  with  utter  ruin  to  the  colonies? 
Those  who  are  acquainted  with  some  late  transactions  in 
this  city,  can  easily  answer  these  questions.  Men  who  are 
solely  guided  by  ambition  and  interest,  are  never  steady 
in  their  conduct.  While  you  gratify  these,  they  will  be 
quiet, — but  no  longer.  Thwart  them  in  the  least,  and 
they  are  like  so  many  bears  robbed  of  their  whelps.  They 
will  indiscriminately  wreak  their  vengeance  on  all  that 

come  in  their  way.     To  gratify  it 

Elect  ere  si  nequeant  Super os, 
Acheronta  movebant. 

This  motto  was  chose  some  years  ago  for  a  periodical 
paper  in  this  city,  by  a  writer  who  was  no  stranger,  I  dare 
say,  to  our  Whig;  but  as  he  did  not  deign  to  give  a  trans- 
lation of  it,  I  will  beg  leave  to  do  it  for  him  here 

If  hap'ly  should  the  pow'rs  above, 
Reject  the  vow  that's  paid  them; 
The  pow'rs  below  they'll  try  to  move, 

And  rouse  all  hell  to  aid  them. 
T  wish  them  joy  of  their  company. 


*  Appeal  to  the  public,  p  70. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  I  I  I 

The  Appeal  had  been  read  and  considered  long  enough 
after  its  publication.  If  not  approved,  why  was  it  not 
then  objected  to?  The  reason  was,  no  ambitious  attempts 
were  then  opposed, — no  towering  expectations  were  blast- 
ed. Matters  went  on  smoothly;  and  had  they  gone  on 
in  the  same  manner  since,  the  Appeal  might  have  remained 
in  peace,  without  any  molestation  from  this  quarter,  not-- 
withstanding its  tremendous  consequences. 

Our  Whig  pragmatically  assumes  to  be  defender-general 
of  the  "religious  Privileges  of  all  Denominations  of  pro- 
''testants,  against  the  secret  or  open  attempts  of  their  ene- 
"'mies."  He  must  be  a  cunning  fellow  indeed  to  know  and 
counteract  those  attempts  which  are  secret.  But  to  let  this 
pass.  Who  assigned  him  this  post  ?  Or,  who  are  these 
enemies  ?  If  by  these  he  means  the  author  of  the  Appeal, 
and  his  friends,  why  was  this  not  made  appear  before? 
If  he  had  such  a  regard,  as  he  pretends,  for  the  religious 
Liberties  of  others, — if  the  Appeal  had  any  tendency  to 
infringe  those :  Surely  this  magnanimous  Champion 
would  not  have  slumbered  and  slept  so  long !  The  truth  is 
as  I  have  mentioned.  The  spirit  of  ambition  and  self  in- 
terest, had  not  met  with  any  check  'till  very  lately.  But 
now  that  their  blooming  hopes  are  withered,  the  faction 
is  enraged  to  a  degree  of  phrenzy;  and  the  poor  Church, 
thro'  the  Appeal,  must  fall  the  devoted  victim  of  their 
vengeance.* 

*It  is  more  than  probable  that  the  same  motives  set  some 
Philadelphia  engineers  to  work,  in  writing  a  paper  called 
the  Centinel;  for  in  No.  I.  the  transactions  alluded  to 
above,  are  mentioned.  No  other  tolerable  reason  can  be 
assigned  for  their  engaging  in  this  controversy  now,  and 
not  before.  The  alarm,  I  suppose  was  given  from  hence; 
and  how  widely  soever  the  authors  of  the  American  Whig, 
and  Centinel,  may  disagree  in  other  respects:  Yet  we  sec, 
they  can  unite  in  abusing  the  Appeal.  No.  I.  of  the  Cen  • 


112  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Some  pretence  however  was  necessary  to  storm  the  Ap- 
peal; and  one  was  found  of  an  extraordinary  kind, — such 
perhaps  as  would  be  the  last  thought  on  by  a  person  who 
possessed  the  most  moderate  portion  of  honesty  and  char- 
ity. And  what  was  it  ?  Why  this — "It  is  not  a  primitive. 
"Christian  Bishop,  that  the  Dr.  and  the  Convention  want. 
"It  is  a  modern,  splendid,  opulent,  Court-favoured,  law- 
"dignified,  superb,  magnificent,  powerful  prelate,  on  which 
"their  heart  is  so  intent." 

Now  to  pass  over  the  defects  of  this  last  wonderful 
period,  in  point  of  propriety  and  style, — the  whole  of  it  I 
aver  to  be  utterly  false.  There  is  not  a  syllable  of  truth  in 
it.  And  here  I  publickly  call  on  this  Gentleman  to  make 
good  his  assertion, — to  produce  some  sort  of  satisfactory 
evidence,  besides  his  own  bare  word,  which  on  this  occa- 
sion will  not  go  far,  that  the  Dr.  and  Convention  desire 
such  a  Bishop.  Until  he  gives  some  proof  of  this,  he  does 
nothing  at  all.  He  fights  with  a  phantom  his  own  imagi- 
nation has  raised.  Like  his  illustrious  predecessor,  Don 
Quixote,  he  encounters  wind-mills  instead  of  giants.  He 
might  as  well  write  against  introducing  the  Pope  of  Rome, 
or  Mufti  of  Constantinople,  and  it  would  be  as  much  to 
the  purpose :  As  writing  against  the  introduction  of  such 
a  Bishop  into  America,  as  no  one  member  of  the  CHURCH, 
either  desires,  or  wishes  for,  I  repeat  it  again,  that  until 
the  author  of  the  American  Whig  produces  some  authentic 
proof  or  testimonies,  that  the  Clergy  want  such  a  Bishop 

tinel,  has  somewhat  more  of  the  appearance  of  reasoning 
than  the  Whig;  but  breaths  the  same' rancorous,  insolent 
spirit;  and  plentifully  abounds  in  misrepresentation,  im- 
pertinence, nonsense,  &c.  &c.  As  the  Church  of  England 
has  several  able  advocates  in  Pennsylvania,  I  doubt  not 
but  some  of  them  will  take  the  Centinel  to  task,  and  give 
him  proper  castigation.  See  the  Pennsylvania  Journal, 
March  24,  1768. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  113 

as  he  has  specified, — that  they  want  "to  involve  America 
"in  ecclesiastical  bondage,"  introduce  "spiritual  courts," 
&c.  as  he  insinuates  :  He  stands  convicted  by  his  own  dec- 
laration, when  he  says,  "the  Appeal  asks  nothing  but  what 
"is  highly  reasonable, — and  it  were  manifest  injustice  to 
"deny  church-men,  what  in  their  opinion,  their  eternal  sal- 
"vation  so  greatly  depends  on."  But  if  he  cannot  produce 
any  such  authentic  proof  or  testimony,  which  I  am  fully 
assured  he  cannot  do,  the  world  must  necessarily  look  on 
him  as  an  invidious  calumniator,  a  false  accuser  of  the 
brethren;  and  certainly  he  knows  very  well  what  an  an- 
cient, powerful  coadjutor  he  has  in  this. 

This  writer  disclaims  the  fetters  of  order  and  system  in 
his  future  productions ;  and  were  I  to  suppose  the  reason 
of  his  doing  so,  is  because  his  principles  are  opposite  to  all 
order,  it  would  be  shewing  him  full  as  much,  if  not  more, 
charity,  than  he  has  shewed  to  Dr.  Chandler  and  the  Con- 
vention. Doubtless  the  Whig,  like  his  brother-savages, 
will  choose  to  carry  on  an  irregular  war.  I  may  not  choose 
to  follow  him  in  all  his  twistings  and  windings.  How- 
ever, I  shall  give  him  such  chastisement,  now  and  then,  as 
he  deserves.  I  shall  develope  his  sophistry,  I  mean  such 
as  I  think  worthy  of  notice,  and  rescue  truth  from  his  fal- 
acies  and  pervertion.  I  may  sometimes  carry  the  war  into 
the  enemy's  country,  and  make  reprisals;  or,  digress  to 
other  subjects,  as  I  think  will  be  entertaining  to  my  read- 
ers. I  may  not  only  strip  the  wolf  of  his  sheep's  clothing ; 
but  also  divest  the  ass  of  his  lion's  skin,  and  then  his  bray- 
ing will  have  no  other  effect,  than  perhaps  to  frighten 
women  and  children. — The  Nezv  York  Gazette  and  Weekly 
Mercury,  No.  857,  April  4,  1768. 

To  the  PRINTER, 
SIR, 
I  was  pleased  to  see  by  your  Advertisement  in  last 


114  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Thursday's  New- York  Journal,  that  you  intend  to  repub- 
lish  in  your  Paper,  the  Pieces  sign'd  An  American  Whig, 
together  with  the  Answers,  and  the  best  Pieces  that  come 
out  in  the  other  Papers  upon  the  Subject  of  that  Contro- 
versy, on  both  Sides  of  the  Question.  The  Exhibition  of 
the  Arguments  on  both  Sides  in  the  same  Paper,  is  cer- 
tainly the  most  likely  Means  to  enable  the  Reader  to  form 
a  just  and  equitable  Judgment; — and  if  we  must  needs  be 
forced  into  this  religious  Controversy,  your  Proposal  bids 
the  fairest  for  deciding  it  according  to  Truth  and  Justice. 
But  at  the  same  Time,  as  a  hearty  Friend  to  the  British 
Colonies,  I  cannot  but  express  my  Concern,  that  this  Con- 
troversy should  have  been  begun  at  such  a  Time  as  this, — 
when  the  united  Efforts  of  all  the  Colonies  are  so  neces- 
sary for  the  preservation  of  their  Constitutional  Rights 
and  Liberties. 

The  Introduction  of  such  a  Dispute  at  this  Time,  I  con- 
ceive to  be  in  many  respects  extremely  injudicious, — as  it 
will  tend  to  take  off  the  public  Attention  from  the  Main 
Chance,  to  disunite,  and  set  us  to  quarreling  among  our 
selves,  and  give  our  Enemies  an  Advantage  over  us :  Be- 
side the  Time  is  quite  improper  for  the  Discussion  of  the 

Subject; When  our  Minds  are  in  a  State  of  anxious 

Concern, whether  we  are  henceforth  to  consider  our- 
selves as  having  any  other  Relation  to  Great-Britain  but 
as  being  her  Slaves, — • — whether  we  have  any  Part  or  Lot 
in  her  beloved  Constitution  and  the  Rights  of  Nature— 
which  have  always  been  our  Boast  and  our  Glory; — wheth- 
er we  are  a  Nation  of  generous  Freemen,  or  of  abject  des- 
picable Slaves  ? In  such  a  State  of  dread  Suspence,  can 

our  Minds  be  in  a  proper  Frame  for  determining  the  subtil 
Disputes  between  Arminians  and  Calvinists,  Church  Men 
and  Presbyterians?  These  Matters  have  of  themselves 
been  often  found  sufficient  to  set  whole  Kingdoms  in  a 
Flame,  and  shall  we  needlessly  kindle  the  Fire  of  Conten- 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  115 

tion  among  ourselves,  when  our  dearest  Interests  are  in 
Danger,  from  false  Friends  within,  and  open  Enemies 
without  ? 

Can  we  think  the  Designs  of  this  Author  of  Dissention, 
this  Sower  of  Discord  among  us,  are  friendly  to  the  Eng- 
lish Constitution  and  Government,  or  the  Rights  of  these 
Colonies  ?  When  these  were  in  the  most  imminent  Danger 
of  being  overturned  and  torne  from  us  by  the  Stamp-Act, 
did  this  Author,  or  his  Party  stir  a  Finger  to  prevent  it? 
Or  have  they  done  any  Thing  since,  in  favour  of  the  Eng- 
lish Constitution  and  American  Rights,  tho'  these  have 
been  repeatedly  attack'd,  by  the  Acts,  for  Billeting  Sol- 
diers,  for  imposing  Duties,  &c?  'On  the  Contrary,  has 

not  this  Attempt  of  the  American  Whig  to  disunite  us,  a 
manifest  Tendency  to  bring  upon  us  all  the  Evils  that 
threaten  us,  and  reduce  us  to  a  State  of  general  Confusion  ? 
And  is  it  not,  from  a  careful  Review  of  every  Circum- 
stance, at  least  highly  probable,  that  he  and  his  Party 
would  rejoice  in  a  Disunion  between  Great-Britain  and  her 
Colonies,  and  would  be  among  the  first  to  change  a  Mon- 
archical for  a  Republican  Government?  Which  may 
Heaven  avert! 

A  SON  OF  LIBERTY. 

—The  New  York  Journal  and  General  Advertiser, 
No.  1318,  April  7,  1768. 

VERDICUS'S  Verses  to  the  Whig  Writer. 
Mr.  GODDARD, 

Please  to  give  the  following  lines  a  place  in  your  next 
weekly  paper. 

What  the  deuce  is  the  matter?    What  daemon  of  late, 
Has  awaken'd  the  fury  of  strife  and  debate? 
Ho !  ye  Sons  of  contention,  pray  whither  so  fast? 

>n't  ye  know  that ((a  cobbler  should  stick  to  his  last?" 

Then  why,  ye  pert  Whigs,  ye  dull  Centinels.  why 


Il6  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Do  ye  fly  in  a  passion  and  make  such  a  cry 

About  Church-men  and  Bishops;  why  make  such  a-do 

About  other  mens  matters?    What  is  it  to  you 

Whether  Bishops  are  sent  us  or  not?    If  we  choose 

To  request  such  a  favour,  must  you  fill  the  news 

With  invectives  and  scandal  ?    Perhaps  you  may  find 

That,  shou'd  we  condescend  to  repay  you  in  kind, 

There's  enough  to  be  said  in  reply  to  your  spleen; 

But  in  such  dirty  work  we  disdain  to  be  seen. 

Yet  occasion  may  happen  to  call  for  a  sprig 

Not  of  laurel,  but  birch,  for  a  libelling  Whig. 

When  a  SEABURY  therefore  stands  forth,  as  the  friend 

Of  sincerity,  honour  and  truth,  to  defend 

The  Convention  from  slander  and  groundless  abuse, 

Take  the  hint,  Mr.  Whig,  you  may  find  it  of  use; 

It  may  serve  to  convince  you,  we're  not  quite  so  tame 

As  not  to  repel  an  attack  on  our  fame, 

But  that  when  you  assert  what  is  false,  we'll  reply 

To  your  malice,  and  prove  your  assertion  a  lie. 

But  observe — • — this  is  no  indiscriminate  charge 
Brought  at  random  against  a  profession  at  large: 
For,  of  every  sect,  there  are  many  who  merit 
The  praise  of  a  generous  catholic  spirit, 
Of  probity,  candour  and  truth;  and  we  deem 
Such  a  character  worthy  our  love  and  esteem, 
Notwithstanding  we  find  it,  as  often  we  may, 
Among  those  whom  we  judge  to  be  sheep  led  astray. 

So  that  if  in  the  present  debate  you  should  find 
We  reply  with  some  warmth,  do,  for  once,  be  so  kind, 
Ye  grave  Centinels,  Whigs,  and  all  other  abettors, 
Of  the  scurrilous  writers  of  scandalous  letters, 
Once  for  all,  be  assur'd  what  we  tell  you  is  true, 
It  is  not  at  Dissenters,  as  such,  but  at  you, 
At  you  only  we  level  our  aim,  and  determine 
No  such  insolent,  meddling,  anonymous  vermin 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  I  I/ 

Shall  be  suffered  among  us  to  sculk,  with  impunity, 
To  disturb  our  repose,  and  infest  the  community 
By  sowing  the  seeds  of  dissention  and  strife 
Among  those  who  wou'd  fain  lead  a  peaceable  life. 

Not  that  we  would  debar  you  the  use  of  the  quill; 
Only  stick  to  the  truth,  and  then  scribble  your  fill. 
But  alas !  in  that  case,  you'll  have  nothing  to  say; 
For,  in  truth,  'tis  as  clear  as  the  Sun  at  noon-day, 
That  the  Church's  request  for  a  Bishop  or  two, 
And  whether  she  gets  them  or  not,  is  to  you 
And  all  other  Dissenters,  a  matter  in  which 
You  have  no  more  concernment,  than  whether  my  Bitch 
Be  a  New-found-land  Spaniel  (and  here — to  be  plain — 
She  comes  in  for  the  rhyme)  or  a  pointer  from  Spain. 

Thus  you  see  all  the  clamour  you're  making  is  founded 
In  falshood  at  last,  and  the  spleen  of  a  Roundhead. 

VERIDICUS. 

,  in  NEW-JERSEY. 

April  4th,  1768. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  66,  April  n, 
1768. 

Mr.  PRINTER, 

When  the  Church  appears  to  be  so  deliberately  attacked, 
and  a  Series  of  Papers  are  to  be  laid  before  the  Public  to 
raise  a  Party  against  her,  and  to  prevent  her  enjoying  her 
ecclesiastical  Government,  equally  with  his  Majesty's  other 
Subjects, — it  may  not  be  improper  to  shew  the  Public  who 
they  are  that  oppose  her,  and  to  guard  against  the  Insinu- 
ations of  those  who  are  her  professed  Enemies; — be 
pleased  therefore  to  insert  the  following.  Z. 

No  Protestants  have  ever  given  the  Government  so 
much  Trouble,  nor  shewn  such  fixed  and  Rooted  Enmity 
to  the  established  Church,  as  that  Denomination  called 
Presbyterians  : — Whether  this  arises  from  real  zeal  for  the 


Il8  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Cause  of  Christianity  or  any  other  Motive,  may  be  an  In- 
quiry.  At  present,  I  will  pass  over  every  Thing  that 

hath  happened  on  the  other  Side  the  Atlantic,  and  only 
take  a  View  of  them  upon,  and  since  their  Settlement  on 
this  Continent. — in  Britain,  they  were  ever  calling  out  for 
Toleration  and  claimed  it  as  a  Right.  Upon  their  Settle- 
ment in  America,  their  Spirit  of  Persecution  broke  out  in 
full  Blaze;  and  no  sooner  had  they  the  Power,  than  every 
Denomination,  particularly  the  Quakers,  very  sensibly  felt, 
that  this  Sect  of  Men,  have  little  other  "Grace  than  what 
is  founded  in  Dominion."  While  other  Denominations 
have  contented  themselves,  with  the  free  Exercise  of  their 
Religion,  and  an  equal  Share  in  the  Offices  of  Govern- 
ment, this  Restless  Sect  has  in  every  Colony  either  at- 
tempted, or  actually  seized  all  Power,  and  shewn  an  equal 
Disposition  to  tyrannize  over  all  others;  to  root  out  not 
only  the  established  Religion,  but  every  other  Denomina- 
tion from  these  Colonies. Hardly  a  Colony  on  the 

Continent,  but  has  groaned  under  their  Tyranny,  or  been 
agitated  by  violent  Parties  fomented  by  these  People,  to 

advance  and  procure  their  favourite  Point,  Dominion. 

The  eastern  Governments  are  a  Proof  of  the  first,  and  the 
Parties  in  New- York  and  Pennsylvania,  are  recent  In- 
stances of  the  latter. But  sensible,  that  their  darling 

Point  can  never  be  attained,  while  the  Church,  as  by  law 
established  stands  in  their  Way,  they  have  ever  paid  their 
greatest  Attention  to  prevent  its  Increase.—  —How  have 
they  calumniated  her  Ministers,  and  ridiculed  her  Cere- 
monies from  Time  to  Time,  as  best  suited  their  Purposes  ? 
And  when  she  asks,  only  equal  Toleration  on  this  Conti- 
nent with  them,  their  Pens  are  employed  to  alarm  the  Peo- 
ple that  some  Encroachment  is  intended  upon  their  reli- 
gious Liberties;  and  according  to  the  Candor  of  these 
Men,  every  Story,  whether  true  or  false,  we  may  expect  to 
see  revived,  and  new  ones  propagated,  to  prevent  that 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  I  19 

Church  from  being  able  to  stem  them  in  their  Career  to 
Power,  and  hinder  them  from  assuming  Dominion  ever 
all  others.  During  a  late  Administration,  the  Province  of 
New- Jersey,  saw  and  felt  the  Effects  of  Presbyterian 
Power;  her  seats  of  Justice,  &c.  Commissions  of  the 
Peace,  were  preferably  conferred  upon  them;  their  Meet- 
ing houses,  which  now  they  affect  to  call  Churches,  were 
every  where  incorporated,  while  Charters  were  denied,  not 
only  to  Churches,  as  by  Law  established,  but  to  other  Dis- 
senters, who  had  equal  Right  with  Presbyterians. The 

Instances  of  their  Lust  for  Power,  and  uncharitable  Treat- 
ment of  those  who  differ  from  them  in  Opinion,  are  noto- 
rious every  where;  nor  have  they  ever  shewn  a  Zeal  for 
Religion,  or  a  charitable  Disposition  to  their  fellow  Chris- 
tians, but  when  it  suited  their  Purposes  and  favoured  their 

darling   Scheme. At  this   Time,   when   Peace  and 

Christian  Charity  should  most  abound  among  us,  that 
Spirit  again  raises  its  Head,  aims  to  throw  the  Continent 
into  Confusion,  and  "sow  the  Seeds  of  Discord,"  to  pre- 
vent the  Church  from  having  its  Government  fully  and 
freely  enjoyed;  and  that  too  after  the  Church  has,  for 
many  Months  laid  before  all  Denominations,  in  an  honest 
Appeal,  the  Difficulties  she  labours  under,  and  the  Means 
she  proposes  to  procure  Redress;  which  is  in  a  Manner, 
that  can  give  no  one  Sect  any  reasonable  Cause  of  Offence : 
Nay,  it  hath  been  repeatedly  acknowledged,  by  some  of 
the  best  of  them,  to  be  a  Measure  which  they  cannot  disap- 
prove of;  and  what  the  American  Whig  owns  to  be 
"highly  reasonable."  But  it  then  suited  their  Politics  to 
be  silent;  it  now  suits  their  Purpose  to  kick  up  a  Dust, 

and  inflame  and  divide  all  Men  as  much  as  possible. 

All  other  Dissenters  need  not  be  told,  that  in  the  Ruin  of 
the  CHURCH  will  be  involved  the  Ruin  of  them  all,  except- 
ing the  Presbyterians :  And  as  they  have  never  experi- 
enced, nor  can  from  any  Thing  proposed  in  the  Appeal, 


120  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

entertain  a  Doubt  that  the  Church  intends  the  least  Injury 
to  the  religious  or  civil  Rights  of  any  Dissenters;  so,  1 
hope  they  will  not  be  led  away  by  the  Arts  and  Insinua- 
tions of  these  Men,  to  join  in  a  Cry  raised  only  to  prevent 
the  Professors  of  the  Church  of  England,  from  enjoying 
the  like  Freedom  in  Church  Government  with  Dissenters, 
— but  will  attend  to  their  Reasonings,  if  happily  any  may 
be  found  in  their  Publications,  and  not  permit  Witticisms, 
or  Insinuations  unsupported  by  good  Authority,  to  beguile 
their  Understandings;  and  if  then  they  discover,  that  the 
Church  meditates  any  Thing  against  their  civil  or  religious 
Liberties,  it  will  be  their  Duty  to  prevent  it :  But,  if,  on 
the  other  Hand,  it  shall  be  found,  that  she  hath  no  such 
Intentions,  Christian  Charity  must  induce  them,  not  to 
deny  her  equal  Toleration  with  themselves.  2. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
858,  April  n,  1768. 

Four  Pounds  Reward. 

STOLEN  out  of  the  stable  of  the  subscriber,  living  in 
the  township  of  Manington,  county  of  Salem,  and  prov- 
ince of  West  New- Jersey,  on  the  I3th  instant,  a  straw- 
berry roan  mare,  about  thirteen  hands  three  inches  high, 
has  a  white  blaze  in  her  face,  short  switch  tail,  and  is  a 
natural  pacer;  she  is  supposed  to  be  stolen  by  one  Law- 
rence Osborne,  alias  Tinnamore,  who  calls  himself  a 
Frenchman,  but  is  supposed  to  be  an  Hibernian;  he  had 
on  when  he  went  away,  a  dark  coloured  great  coat,  very 
long,  a  light  coloured  under  coat,  red  plush  jacket  and 
buckskin  breeches.  He  took  with  him  his  own  gelding, 
which  has  a  short  tail,  and  is  nearly  of  the  same  colour  as 
the  mare.  Whoever  takes  up  the  above  described  thief, 
so  that  he  may  be  brought  to  justice,  and  secures  the  said 
mare,  so  that  the  owner  may  have  her  again,  shall  have 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  121 

the  above  reward,  or  FORTY  SHILLINGS  for  either,  and  rea- 
sonable charges  paid,  by 

PRESTON  CARPENTER. 
Salem,  March  29,  1768 

To  BE  SOLD, 
At  public  Vendue,  on  Thursday  the  I4th  of  April  next, 

ALL  that  valuable  Plantation  or  Farm,  situate,  lying 
and  being,  at  Millstone,  near  Somerset  Court-House,  in 
the  Province  of  Nezv- Jersey,  containing  414  Acres  and 
an  Half  of  good  Land,  whereof  150  Acres  is  very  well 
timbered,  and  16  Acres  of  well  improved  Meadow,  three 
bearing  Orchards ;  a  very  convenient  Dwelling-House  on 
the  said  Farm,  with  four  Rooms  on  a  Floor,  and  a  Fire 
Place  in  each  Room;  also  a  Kitchen,  a  Milk  Room  and 
Cellar  under  the  House, 'two  good  Gardens  fronting  the 
House,  with  an  Avenue  between  leading  to  the  House, 
and  two  good  Barns  on  the  said  Premises;  the  whole 
being  in  good  Repair.  Likewise  to  be  sold,  at  the  Time 
and  Place  aforesaid,  a  very  good  House  and  Lot  of  Land, 
being  about  a  Quarter  of  an  Acre,  and  a  Smith's  Shop, 
being  very  convenient  for  that  Business,  as  there  is  none 
within  two  Miles,  or  suitable  for  any  other  Tradesman. 
The  said  Lot  is  adjoining  to  the  above-mentioned  Farm. 
The  Conditions  of  Sale  will  be  made  known  at  the  Time 
and  Place  of  Sale,  and  due  Attendance  given  by 

EDMUND  LESLIE. 

N.  B.  Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase  the  above  said 
Premises,  before  the  Day  of  Sale,  may  apply  to  the  Sub- 
scriber, or  to  Mr.  Peter  Schenk,  who  has  Power  for  the 
same.  The  Vendue  to  begin  at  10  o' Clock. — The  New 
York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1317,  March  28, 
1768. 

ALL  Persons  who  have  any  Demands  on  the  Estate  of 


122  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

the  late  Augustine  Moore,  Esq;  Attorney  at  Law,  at  Mor- 
ris Town,  deceased,  are  desired  to  send  the  same  to  Mary 
Moore,  sole  Executrix,  that  they  may  be  adjusted;  and 
all  those  who  are  indebted  to  said  Estate  on  Bond,  Note, 
or  otherwise,  are  desired  to  make  speedy  Payment,  or  they 
will  be  prosecuted. 

Morris  Town,  March  i,  1768. 

VESUVIUS  FURNACE,  at  Newark, 

in  New- Jersey. 

A  Single  Man,  well  recommended,  who  understands 
moulding  and  casting  of  Iron  Hollow  Ware,  in  all  its 
branches,  may  hear  of  good  Encouragement,  by  applying 
to  Mr.  James  Abeel,  Merchant,  in  New- York,  or  to  Moses 
Ogden,  at  said  Furnace. — The  Neiv  York  Gazette  and 
Weekly  Mercury,  No.  856,  March  28,  1768. 

PUBLIC  Notice  is  hereby  given,  that  the  Trustees  of 
Queen's  College  are  to  meet  the  Second  Tuesday  in  May 
next,  at  New-Brunswick. 

DAVID  MARINUS/  Clerk. 

To  be  sold,  at  public  Vendue,  on  the  2Oth  Day  of  April 
next,  on  the  Premises,  by  the  Subscriber,  and  entered 
upon  immediately. 

THE  noted  tavern  in  Shrewsbury,  at  the  corner  of  the 
street  and  sign  of  the  blue  ball;  together  with  orchards, 
out-houses,  gardens,  &c.  Also  four  other  lots  of  land  and 
meadow,  containing  about  150  acres.  They  will  be  sold 
together  or  separate,  as  will  best  suit  the  purchaser  or  pur- 
chasers. Any  person  applying  before  the  day  of  sale  for 
said  tavern  or  lots,  may  know  the  terms  from  the  sub- 
scriber, who  will  give  an  indisputable  title  for  the  same. 

i  Pastor  for  many  years  of  the  Reformed  Dutch  churches  at  Acquack- 
anonk  (now  Passaic)  and  Totowa  (now  Paterson). 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  12  3 

The  conditions,  if  sold  publickly,  will  be  made  known  at 
the  time  and  place,  by  JOSIAH  HALSTEAD. 

N.  B.  One  or  more  likely  Negro  boys  to  be  sold,  at 
private  sale,  the  same  time,  or  before,  who  can  be  well 
recommended. 

BROKE  out  of  gaol  in  Sussex-county,  New- Jersey,  the 
following  prisoners,  viz.  WILLIAM  DAVIDSON,  and  EB- 
ENEZER  DRAKE,  debtors;  and  JOHN  SCANTLING,  an  Irish 
servant,  belonging  to  David  Gold.  Davidson,  is  a  small 
man,  has  yellowish  hair,  and  is  somewhat  bald  headed; 
DRAKE,  a  smallish  man,  with  black  hair  somewhat  curled : 
These  two  are  supposed  to  be  in  New- York.  SCANTLING, 
is  a  stout  lusty  fellow,  has  black  hair,  and  had  on  a  blue 
jacket,  and  Indian  stockings;  he  loves  drink,  seems  fond 
of  the  water,  and  it  is  supposed  will  endeavour  to  get  to 
sea;  all  masters  of  vessels  are  therefore  cautioned  and 
desired,  not  to  employ  or  carry  him  off,  as  they  would 
avoid  the  penalty.  Whoever  takes  up  the  said  persons,  or 
either  of  them,  will  have  three  pounds  reward  for  each 
one  delivered  to  the  subscriber,  besides  all  reasonable 
charges,  viz.  For  the  servant,  from  the  said  Daniel 
Gould,  and  for  the  other  two  from 

JACOB  STARN,  High  Sheriff,  of  said  County. 

FERDINAND 

A  Beautiful  dark  bay  HORSE,  near 
CUT     1         seventeen    hands    high,    rising    eight 
OF  years  old;    was  brought  to  America 

about  eighteen  months  ago,  by  the  sub- 
H  scriber,   for  the  improvement  of  the 

breed  of  horses  in  America.  The  sire  of  him  was  a  fa- 
mous Spanish  horse,  belonging  to  Lord  Kintire,  in  Scot- 
land, sent  to  his  Lordship  by  his  brother,  from  Spain :  For 


124  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

shape  and  complete  make  in  all  his  parts,  he  is  allowed  by 
the  best  judges  to  equal  if  not  to  exceed  any  horse  brought 
from  Europe  to  this  part  of  America;  will  serve  mares 
the  ensuing  season  at  Morrisdon,  in  the  county  of  Mon- 
mouth,  East  New-Jersey,  for  the  sum  of  four  pounds 
proclamation;  and  if  the  mares  don't  prove  with  foal, 
they  may  be  brought  and  served  the  next  season,  for  two 
pounds  proclamation. 

N.  B.    Good  pasture  for  mares,  at  a  reasonable  rate. 

MICHAEL  KEARNEY.1 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1317,  March  31,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  March  31 

Captain  Mansfield,  from  Salem,  in  New  England,  on 
the  22d  Instant,  off  Long-Island,  spoke  a  Schooner,  Cap- 
tain Talbot,  from  Virginia  for  Salem.  He  says,  he  was 
informed  by  a  Cape  May  Pilot,  that  off  of  the  Five  Fathom 
Bank,  he  saw  floating  the  Quarter  Deck  entire,  and  also 
Part  of  the  Bows  of  a  Vessel,  which  he  though  to  have 
been  a  Brig;  the  Quarter  Deck  was  clean  scraped,  sup- 
posed to  be  inward  bound. 

Captain  Allen,  from  the  Grenades,  on  the  23d  spoke 
with  Captain  Parker,  from  this  Port  for  Boston,  8  Hours 
from  our  Capes. 

STOLEN,  as  is  supposed,  in  the  night  of  the  24th  of 


i  Michael  Kearny  was  a  son  of  Michael  Kearny,  an  eminent  citizen 
of  New  Jersey.  Michael,  2d,  entered  the  British  navy.  In  1769  he  was 
recommended  by  Gov.  Franklin  for  a  seat  in  the  Council,  as  a  "Gentle- 
man who  has  a  Commission  in  His  Majesty's  Navy,  but  resides  at 
present  on  his  Paternal  Estate  in  Monmouth  County,  and  is  related  to 
some  of  the  principal  Families  in  the  Colony."  His  residence  was  on 
the  Morris  estate.  He  died  unmarried. — Whitehead's  Perth  Amboy,  92; 
N.  J.  Archives,  X.,  132.  Mr.  Whitehead  says  he  was  a  son  of  Sarah, 
dau.  of  Lewis  Morris  (and  Isabella,  his  wife);  but  Mrs.  Lewis  Morris, 
in  her  will,  dated  Aug.  9,  1746,  proved  April  20,  1752,  does  not  mention 
him,  although  particular  to  name  all  her  children,  and  children  of  her 
deceased  daughters.  Kearny  and  Isabella.  It  is  not  unlikely  that 
Michael.  2d.  was  a  son  of  Michael,  1st,  by  his  second  wife,  Elizabeth 
Eritz  or  Britain  (who  was  not  known  to  Mr.  Whitehead),  who  was  also 
the  mother  of  Philip,  the  eldest  son  (born  at  sea)  of  Michael,  1st. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  125 

March,  out  of  the  stable  of  the  subscriber,  in  New  town,  in 
Gloucester  county,  and  western  division  of  New-Jersey,  a 
dark  brown,  or  rather  black  horse,  having  no  white  on  him 
but  a  saddle  mark,  about  14  and  a  half  hands  high,  paces 
and  trots,  is  used  to  the  gears,  branded  on  the  near  side 
with  I  on  the  shoulder,  and  C  on  the  buttock.  Whoever 
will  bring  the  said  horse  to  the  subscriber,  shall  have 
THIRTY  SHILLINGS  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by 

JOSEPH  KAIGHN 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2049,  March  31, 
1768. 

The  CENTINEL.    No.  II. 

IN  my  last  Paper  I  took  Notice  of  some  of  the  favorite 
cant  Words  in  Dr.  Chandler's  Appeal,  &c  which  he  has 
used  to  amuse  and  impose  on  the  Public;  the  common 
Practice  of  designing  Men,  who  want  to  raise  Disturb- 
ances in  Church  or  State 

The  true  but  latent  Reason,  as  it  seems,  was  to 

prepare  the  Way  for  Episcopal  Dominion;  Hence  it 
came  to  pass  that  tho'  many  Missionaries  were  sent  to 
America,  with  Salaries  paid  them  out  of  the  Money  sub- 
scribed for  converting  Heathens  to  Christianity,  not  more 
than  two  or  three  (just  enough  to  talk  of  and  keep  up  the 
Pretence)  were  ever  sent  among  the  Indians,  the  rest  were 
chiefly  employed  in  New-England,  New- York,  New- Jer- 
sey and  Pennsylvania,  and  settled  in  the  Cities  and  larger 
Towns  and  Villages,  in  which  the  regular  public  Worship 
of  God  had  been  long  before  duly  kept  up  and  a  Ministry 
maintained.*  .... 

[signed]     N. 

*The  Candid  Doctor  Bray  the  Bishop  of  London's  Com- 
missary in  Maryland,  just  before  the  Incorporation  of  the 


126  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [  1 768 

Society  (who  our  Doctor  calls  the  Father  of  the  Society) 
after  having  taken  great  Pains  to  inform  himself,  says, 
C(that  from  N civ-York  Northward  he  found  very  little 
Need  of  Missionaries  and  in  the  Colonies  of  Connecticut 
and  the  Massachusetts,  none  at  all  -  -  -  And  yet  in 
1761  there  were  jo  Salaried  Men  employed  by  the  Society 
iw  New-England,  55  in  New-York,  New- Jersey  and  Penn- 
sylvania, and  only  14  in  all  the  other  Continent  and  Island 
Colonies,  altho'  poor  blind  Heathen  Negroes  make  up  the 
Body  of  the  People  in  most  of  these  last  mentioned. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1321,  March  31,  1768. 

Philadelphia  March  28.  We  hear  from  Salem  County, 
New- Jersey,  that  on  Saturday  Evening  the  iQth  Inst.  there 
was  the  highest  Tide  there,  that  has  been  known  by  the 
oldest  Man  now  living,  which  occasioned  the  Loss  of  sev- 
eral Hundred  Sheep  and  Lambs,  besides  many  horned 
Cattle,  Hogs,  &c.  and  had  done  great  Damage  to  the  Tide 
Banks. — Supplement  to  the  New  York  Journal  or  General 
Advertiser,  No.  .1317,  April  2  (?),  1768. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

At  Public  Vendue,  on  Monday  the  i8th  Day  of  April  next, 
at  One  of  the  Clock,  at  Canoe-Brook,  in  Essex  County. 

A  Good  Plantation,  whereon  Thcophilus  Ward,  now 
lives;  containing  225  Acres  of  choice  good  Land,  with  a 
pleasant  Stream  running  through  it,  whereon  is  a  good 
Saw-Mill,  the  half  of  which  is  to  be  sold  with  said  Planta- 
tion, also  a  good  House,  and  about  140  Apple  Trees,  100 
of  which  begins  to  bear,  also  a  large  Nursery;  there  is 
near  40  Acres  of  Land  cleared,  and  in  good  Fence,  and 
near  half  of  said  Plantation  is  a  very  good  Swamp,  which 
can  be  easily  made  the  best  of  Meadow,  some  of  it  is  al- 
ready cleared,  and  in  Fence;  said  Plantation  is  but  10 
Miles  from  Newark  Landing,  and  12  Miles  from  Eliza- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 

beth-Town;  the  Title  is  good,  and  the  Purchaser  can  have 
long  Payments  for  three-fourths  of  the  Purchase  Money, 
with  paying  one- fourth  down,  and  Security  for  the  Rest; 
and  if  it  should  best  suit  the  Purchasers,  I  will  sell  it  in 
two  Lotts,  one  of  125  acres,  and  the  other  of  100  Acres; 
the  Land  is  well  timbered :  Any  Person  inclining  to  pur- 
chase before  the  Day  of  Sale,  may  inform  themselves  of 
further  Particulars,  by  applying  to  Samuel  Ward,  on 
S  tat  en-Island,  or  Theophilus  Ward  on  the  Premises, 
where  said  Vendue  will  be  held. 

SAMUEL  WARD. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1318,  April  4,  1768. 

Friend  GODDARD, 

Suffer  me,  through  the  channel  of  thy  paper,  to  offer 
a  zvord  of  expostulation  to  the  Rev.  Dr.  Thomas  Bradbury 
Chandler,  the  Society's  Missionary  at  Elizabeth-Town,  on 

his  late  publication. Thine, 

PROBITAS. 

To  the  Reverend  Dr.  CHANDLER. 
Rev.  Friend, 

THE  seeming  candour  with  which  thou  hast  thought 
proper  to  usher  thy  performance  into  the  world,  induced 
me  to  give  it  a  serious  reading,  in  hopes  therein  to  find 

somewhat  tending  to  edification 

[signed]     Thy  friend' in  all  things  honest, 

PROBITAS. 

Just  published  at  New-York,  and  to  be  sold  by  the 

Printer  hereof, 

A  COMPANION  for  the  YOUNG  PEOPLE  of  NORTH- 
AMERICA,  particularly  recommended  to  those  within  the 
Provinces  of  New-York,  New- Jersey,  and  Pennsylvania, 


128  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

calculated  for  the  Promotion  -and  Furtherance  of  Chris- 
tian Decorum  among  Families,  to  excite  a  laudable  and 
Christian  Emulation  among  young  People,  to  pursue  the 
Paths  that  lead  to  real  Religion :  By  attempting  to  dis- 
cover the  Beauties  of  a  virtuous  Life,  and  remove  all  Ob- 
jections against  being  religious.  By  AHIMAAZ  HAR- 
KER,  a  Candidate  for  the  Ministry.1 

The  Spring  Fair  will  be  held  at  Princeton,  on  Wednes- 
day and  Thursday  the  zoth  and  2ist  Instant. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Chronicle,  No.  65,  April  4,  1768. 

Seventeen  Pounds  Reward, 

FOR  returning  or  securing  the  five  following  Runa- 
ways, viz.  A  very  small  Man,  Thomas  Bealie,  who  es- 
caped from  Sussex  Gaol,  in  New- Jersey,  about  eight  Days 
ago,  has  remarkably  large  Eyes,  is  an  English  Man,  and 
said  he  was  well  acquainted  with  one  Mr.  Higgins  living 
in  the  City  of  New- York. 

Four  Men  who  went  off  from  Change  Water  Forge,  in 
Sussex  County,  the  26th  Instant,  viz. 

Jacob  New  town,  about  37  Years  of  Age,  a  sturdy  reso- 
lute Man,  about  6  Feet  high,  born  in  New-England,  by 
Trade  a  Black- Smith,  and  Collier,  but  later ly  employ 'd  as 
a  Wood  Cutter ;  his  Apparel  is  not  remember'd.  Another 
Man  named  Cornelius,  (his  Surname  unknown)  about  5 
Feet  10  or  n  Inches  high,  full  faced,  broad  shoulder'd, 
and  had  on  a  Felt  Hat.  William  Morris,  about  35  Years 
of  Age,  5  Feet  5  Inches  high,  speaks  broad  English;  had 
on  a  blue  Coat,  faced  with  Red,  a  Pair  of  cloth  Breeches, 
a  Check  Shirt,  and  an  old  Felt  Hat.  These  three  Men 
took  with  them  three  narrow  Axes,  two  Guns,  and  an 

i  Son  of  the  Rev.  Samuel  Marker.  Presbyterian  minister  at  Black 
River,  Morris  county.  He  and  his  father  were  drowned  at  sea  while 
the  son  was  on  a  voyage  to  England  to  be  ordained  to  the  ministry  in 
the  Church  of  England.  See  N.  J.  Archives,  XX..  160.  note. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 29 

Irish  Servant  Man,  named  Thomas  Murphy,  whom  it  is 
supposed  they  will  endeavour  to  sell  as  their  own  Prop- 
erty; he  is  about  20  Years  of  Age,  5  Feet  5  Inches  high, 
has  black  Hair,  is  a  Shoe-Maker  by  Trade,  had  on  a  Sail- 
ors blue  Waistcoat,  and  under  Waistcoat,  a  Pair  of  new 
Buckskin  Breeches,  new  fulled  Stockings,  and  a  felt  Hat. 
It  is  thought  they  will  endeavour  to  get  to  New-England, 
or  the  upper  Part  of  New- York  Government.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  returns  all  or  any  of  the  said  Persons,  or  se- 
cures them,  so  that  they  may  be  brought  to  the  Subscriber, 
giving  him  proper  Notice,  shall  receive  for  the  Man  first 
mention'd,  who  escaped  from  Gaol,  Five  Pounds,  and  for 
each  of  the  others  so  secured  or  returned,  Three  Pounds 
Reward  for  each,  besides  all  reasonable  Charges. 

JACOB  STARN. 

A  Purse  of  Fifty  Dollars, 

To  be  run  for  on  Monday  the  sec- 
f     CUT      1         ond  day  of  May  next,  at  Perth- Amboy, 
QF  free  for  any  horse,  mare  or  gelding, 

not  more  than  half  blood,  (Mr,  Mor- 
HORSE  j         ris's  mare  Strumpet  excepted)  carry- 
ing weight  for  age,  to  run  the  two  mile 
heats;    (any  horse  winning  two  heats 
to  be  entitled  to  the  purse)  not  less  than  four  reputed  run- 
ning horses  will  be  allowed  to  start;   the  entrance  money 
to  be  run  for  the  day  following;    the  winning  and  dis- 
tanc'd  horses  excepted,  to  be  entered  on  or  before  the  thir- 
teenth day  of  April,  with  Richard  Carnes,  jun.  or  Isaac 
Bonnell,  paying  three  dollars,  entrance  or  double  at  the 
post.    For  further  sport,  the  same  day,  a  complete  saddle, 
bridle,  and  whip,  will  be  run  for  by  common  horses. 
Perth- Amboy,  March  28,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1318,  April  7,  1768. 


130  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

To  be  SOLD, 

No.  i.  A  PLANTATION,  being  a  part  of  a  tract  of  land, 
situate  on  the  main  branch  of  Great  Timber  Creek,  in  the 
township  of  Deptford,  and  county  of  Gloucester,  in  the 
province  of  West  New-Jersey,  containing  about  200  acres, 
20  of  which  were  lately  cleared,  with  a  sufficient  quantity 
of  meadow,  and  more  may  be  made;  -  -  -  the  remaining 
part  is  well  timbered  land;  on  this  place  is  a  new  log- 
house  and  other  improvements;  about  one  mile  distant 
from  a  landing  on  said  creek,  and  half  a  mile  from  a  grist 
mill,  fulling  mill,  and  Meeting-house,  and  8  miles  from 
the  town  of  Gloucester. 

No.  2.  A  piece  of  good  young  cedar  swamp,  containing 
about  60  acres,  on  a  main  branch  of  Great  Egg-Harbour 
river,  called  Squancum,  about  15  miles  from  a  landing 
on  Timber  Creek,  in  the  county  and  province  aforesaid. 

No.  3.  A  piece  of  cedar  swamp,  of  about  20  acres, 
which  lies  higher  up  the  said  branch,  and  nearly  adjoining 
the  above  60  acres. 

No.  4.  A  right  to  200  acres  of  land,  to  be  taken  up  in 
the  Western  division  of  the  province  of  New-Jersey  afore- 
said. 

No.  5.  A  good  frame  tenement,  and  lot  of  ground 
....  in  the  county  of  Kent,  on  Delaware 

No.  6.    A  new  brick  house    ....    in  Philadelphia. 

No.  7.    A  small  plantation  in  Passyunk  township  .... 

Any  person  or  persons  who  shall  incline  to  purchase,  for 
title  and  terms,  which  will  be  made  easy,  may  apply  to 
JOHN  HEATON,  near  the  Drawbridge,  Philadelphia. — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2050,  April  7,  1768. 

BY  virtue  of  a  writ,  to  me  directed,  on  the  first  day  of 
June  next,  will  be  exposed  to  sale,  by  public  vendue,  at  the 
dwelling-house  of  John  English,  jun.  in  the  township  of 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  131 

Great  Egg-Harbour,  at  10  o'clock  in  the  forenoon  of  said 
day,  oxen,  cows,  horses,  and  young  cattle,  a  pair  of  tim- 
ber wheels,  and  waggon,  a  desk  and  book-case,  a  case  of 
walnut  drawers,  sundry  feather  beds,  and  other  articles 
of  houshold  furniture,  too  tedious  to  mention.  And  upon 
the  same  day  and  place,  between  the  hours  of  12  and  5  in 
the  afternoon,  will  be  exposed  to  sale,  by  public  vendue, 
the  plantation  whereon  the  said  John  English  now  lives, 
containing  150  acres,  100  acres  of  which  is  good  marsh 
or  meadow  ground,  a  good  dwelling-house,  saw-mill,  and 
grist-mill  on  the  premises,  supplied  with  water  by  a  large 
and  constant  stream,  an  orchard,  and  30  acres  of  upland 
cleared,  situate  on  the  east  side  of  Great  Egg-Harbour 
river,  where  boards,  lumber  or  any  kind  of  produce,  may 
easily  be  carried  to  the  tide.  Also  the  following  tracts  of 
pine  land,  adjoining  the  above,  viz.  in  acres,  and  239 
acres ;  and  another  plantation,  situate  near  the  above,  con- 
taining 107  acres,  with  a  dwelling  house,  and  other  im- 
provements, thereon.  And  also,  all  other  the  real  and  per- 
sonal estate  of  the  said  John  English,  being  seized,  and 
taken  in  execution  by  me 

SAMUEL  BLACKWOOD,  Sheriff. 

N.  B.  If  any  part  of  the  above  lands  should  not  be 
sold  on  the  day  above  mentioned,  the  sale  will  be  pro- 
ceeded on  the  next  day,  and  the  purchaser  may  have  credit 
for  part  of  the  purchase  money. 

To  be  sold,  by  Way  of  public  Vendue,  on  Monday,  the 
25th  Day  of  this  instant  April,  at  10  of  the  Clock  in  the 
Forenoon,  a  Fulling  Mill,  with  a  fine  Stream  of  Water, 
situate  in  Allen-Town,  East  Jersey,  with  three  Pair  of 
Sheers,  and  all  Utensils,  for  carrying  on  the  Fulling  Busi- 
ness, with  sundry  Kinds  of  dying  Stuffs,  a  good  Dwelling- 
House,  with  two  Acres  and  a  Half  of  Meadow,  just  by 


132  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

the  Mill;  likewise  two  Lots  of  very  good  Wood  Land, 
within  about  two  Miles  of  said  Allen-Town,  one  about 
nineteen  Acres,  the  other  Twelve,  with  sundry  Kinds  of 
Houshold  Goods,  ajid  a  young  Milch  Cow.  All  the  above 
mentioned  Premises  being  late  the  real  Estate  of  Isaac 
Price,  deceased.  Where  Attendance  will  be  given,  and 
the  Terms  of  Sale  made  known,  by  PETER  BREWER,  and 
NATHAN  ROBINS,  Executors. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette, 
No.  2050,  April  7,  1768. 

The  CENTINEL,  No.  III.1 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.    1322,  April   7, 
1768. 

To  be  sold  at  public  Vendue  on  Monday  the  second  Day 
of  May  next,  or  at  private  Sale  any  Time  before,  on 
the  Premises,  situate  about  200  Yards  from  the 
Court  House  at  Hackinsack  in  Bergen  County,  New- 
Jersey. 

FOUR  Lots  of  Land  with  the  Houses 
and  Improvements  thereon,   viz.     A 
CUT     1        good  Dwelling  House,  40  Feet  by  21, 
two  Stories  and  a  half  high;  a  joiner's 
Shop,  a  Barn,  &c.  each  Lot  is  43  Feet 
HOUSE   j         in  jrront  an,j  150  in  Length,  they  lie 

on  the  Road  that  leads  to  New- York, 
have  a  navigable  Creek  behind  them/convenient  for  Water 
Carriage,  and  would  be  suitable  either  for  a  Gentleman  or 
Tradesman :    Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  ap- 
ply to  the  Subscriber  on  the  Premises,  who  will  give  a  suf- 
ficient Title.  ISAAC  KINGSLAND.* 
— Supplement  to  the  New  York  Journal  or  General 
Advertiser,  No.  1317,  April  9,  1768. 

1  Two  columns  and  a  half,  signed  X. 

2  Probably   son   of   Edmund   Kingsland   and   his   wife.    Mary.    dau.    of 
William  Pinhcrne.     Isaac  was  commissioned  Sheriff  of  Bergen  county. 
September  1,   1762. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  133 


To  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Tuesday  the  iQth  Day 

of  this  Instant  April,  on  the  Premises. 
Two  Farms,  now  in  the  possession  of  Johannes  Schenck, 
situate  at  Reading-Town,  in  Hunterdon  county,  New-  Jer- 
sey, about  one  mile  from  a  large  merchant  mill,  and  store, 
in  a  thick  settled  part  of  the  country,  and  a  good  neigh- 
bourhood. The  one  containing  232  acres  of  very  good 
land  and  meadow,  with  a  good  dwelling  house,  and  large 
barn,  both  new,  and  a  very  good  orchard  on  it,  and  is  well 
watered;  the  other  farm  adjoining  thereto,  containing  200 
acres,  also  very  good  land  and  meadow,  with  a  house,  and 
barn,  and  a  very  good  orchard  thereon,  also  well  watered, 
&c.  The  said  farms  are  so  situated  that  they  may  make 
one  large  regular  farm.  The  purchaser  may  have  a  twelve 
months'  time  to  make  the  first  payment,  without  interest. 
At  the  same  time  and  place,  will  also  be  sold,  negroes,  hor- 
ses, cattle,  sheep,  hogs,  waggons,  ploughs,  harrows,  far- 
mers utensils,  houshold  furniture,  green  wheat,  and  some 
shop  goods,  &c. 

To  be  sold,  a  Plantation,  lying  in  Middlesex,  East-New- 
Jersey,  about  7  Miles  South  from  Amboy,  and  within  2 
Miles  of  a  Landing  where  ten  Cord  Boats  load.  Also  a 
Lot  of  salt  Meadow,  lying  at  said  Landing.  The  Planta- 
tion contains  about  300  Acres  of  Land,  130  of  which  are 
cleared,  15  of  good  fresh  Meadow  fit  for  mowing,  and  30 
Acres  more  may  be  made;  the  Wood  Land  is  well  tim- 
bered. There  is  on  said  Plantation,  a  good  Dwelling- 
House,  built  of  Stone,  with  four  Rooms  on  a  Floor;  a 
good  Stone  Well,  Barn,  and  Orchard  that  contains  250 
Trees  of  the  best  of  Fruit.  Whoever  inclines  to  purchase 
the  Whole,  or  Part  of  the  above  Premises,  may  apply  to 
Thomas,  or  Joshua  Warn,  living  on  the  Premises. 

I  Hereby  inform  all  Persons  that  have  any  Demands 


134  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

on  me  the  Subscriber,  that  they  will  oblige  me  in  sending 
in  their  Accounts  by  the  first  Day  of  June  next,  that  they 
may  be  settled;  and  also  all  Persons  that  stand  indebted 
to  me,  that  they  are  desired  to  discharge  the  same  by  the 
said  Day,  when  I  would  chuse  to  close  all  my  Accounts, 
as  I  then  intend  to  enter  into  Partnership  with  Uzal  Ward, 
in  Trade;  and  further  acquaint  my  Customers,  and  others, 
that  I  now  have  a  good  Assortment  of  Goods,  which  I 
will  sell  cheap  for  Cash  or  short  Credit. 

Newark,  March  31,  1768.  JOSEPH  HEDDEN. 

A  new  erected  Stage, 

For  PASSENGERS, 

KEPT  by  Thomas  Davis,  of  Newark,  will  set  out  from 
thence  every  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  about  8  o' Clock 
in  the  Morning,  and  proceed  to  the  Ferry  at  Powles  Hook, 
opposite  the  City  of  New- York;  and  from  thence  set  out 
again  for  Newark,  between  2  and  3  o' Clock  in  the  After- 
noon of  the  same  Days.  Fare  for  each  Passenger,  ONE 
SHILLING. 

To  be  sold,  at  Newark,  East  New- 
j'     CUT      ]         Jersey,  on  Mr.   Samuel  Governieur's 
Wharf,  a  Vessel  in  Frame  of  the  fol- 
lowing Demensions,  That  is  to  say,  41 
[  VESSEL  j         Feet  Keel,  18  Feet  Beam,  and  8  1-2 
Feet    Hold.      Said    Vessel    measures 
about  sixty  four  Tons,  Carpenter's  Tonnage;    the  Timber 
is  well  seasoned  and  very  good.    Any  Person  inclining  to 
purchase  said  Vessel,  may  apply  to  me  the  Subscriber,  liv- 
ing in  Newark  aforesaid,  who  will  sell  said  Vessel  cheap. 

JOSHUA  ATTWOOD 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
858,  April  n,  1768. 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  135 

Trenton,  April  4. 
To  BE  SOLD, 
By  the  SUBSCRIBER. 

THAT  very  valuable  and  beautifully  situated  Farm,  ad- 
joining to,  and  has  an  Extent  of  above  a  Mile  on  the  River 
Delaware,  in  the  Township  of  Tenicum,  Bucks  County, 
Pennsylvania,  with  a  very  convenient  Ferry  belonging  to 
the  same,  now  in  the  Possession  of  John  Tinbrook,  late 
the  Property  and  Homestead  Farm  of  Mr.  Richard  Stev- 
ens, containing  460  Acres,  and  some  odd;  265  Acres  of 
which  is  exceeding  fine  Low-Land,  with  some  good 
Meadow,  the  Remainder  very  good  Red  Shell  Up-Land, 
well  timber'd,  and  free  of  Stone,  and  reckoned  one  of  the 
finest  Farms  on  the  River;  it  has  on  it  a  good  new  Dwell- 
ing-House,  two  Stories  high,  three  Rooms  on  a  Floor,  a 
Kitchen  and  Cellar  under  the  whole,  with  a  good  Barn, 
two  Log-Houses,  and  two  Orchards,  with  other  good 
Improvements.  Also,  a  Farm  near  said  Homestead,  in 
Possession  of  Abraham  Bennet,  containing  112  Acres  of 
good  Red  Shell  Wheat  Land,  about  30  Acres  of  which  is 
cleared,  the  Remainder  well  timber'd,  it  has  a  good  Log- 
House,  with  other  Improvements  thereon.1 

The  Purchaser  may  have  the  Farms  on  very  moderate 
Terms,  Easy  Payments,  and  a  clear  and  good  Title. 

WILLIAM  PiDGEON.2 

Perth- Amboy,  March  30,  1768. 
To  be  SOLD,  by  the  subscriber, 

A  Valuable  plantation,  situated  on  the  south  side  of 
Raritan  river,  containing  about  370  acres  of  up-land  and 
meadow.  There  is  about  60  acres  cleared,  and  in  good 

iSee  N.   J.   Archives,   XX.,    645. 

"William  Pidgeon  was  admitted  to  the  New  Jersey  bar  in  1750.  He 
was  a  prominent  citizen  of  Trenton  for  many  years,  a  trustee  of  the 
Presbyterian  church,  executor  of  the  will  of  Daniel  Coxe,  4th,  and  was 
entrusted  with  many  important  and  responsible  duties. 


136  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

fence,  and  about  20  acres  of  good  salt  meadow.  There  is 
also  some  good  fresh  meadow,  and  a  great  deal  more  may 
be  made,  the  place  being  capable  of  great  improvement. 
The  wood  land  is  well  timbered.  There  is  on  it  a  double 
house,  with  three  fire-places;  a  good  garden  paled  in,  a 
large  orchard  of  apple  trees  of  good  fruit;  and  also  a  good 
peach  orchard.  There  is  a  saw-mill  and  a  house,  with  sev- 
eral other  conveniences  adjoining  the  saw-mill,  at  some 
distance  from  the  other  house,  so  that  the  farm  can  be  di- 
vided into  two  good  settlements,  as  it  is  at  present.  There 
is  a  fine  fishing  place  belonging  to  it :  And  good  oyster- 
ing,  clamming,  and  good  fowling,  and  has  the  conveniency 
of  a  good  navigable  creek,  where  boats  of  ten  and  twelve 
cord  can  go  up  and  load  and  unload  within  a  small  dis- 
tance of  the  saw-mill,  from  the  tail  of  which  the  boards 
can,  with  great  convenience,  be  floated  down  the  creek  to 
the  boats :  It  is  about  two  miles  and  a  half  from  the  city 
of  Perth-Amboy,  and  about  six  miles  from  the  city  of 
New-Brunswick,  very  convenient  to  both  markets.  There 
is  a  prospect  of  both  a  coal  and  iron  mine  on  the  place. 

Any  person  that  inclines  to  purchase  the  above-men- 
tioned farm,  may  apply  to  the  subscriber  in  Perth-Amboy, 
who  will  sell  reasonable  and  give  an  indisputable  title. 

WILLIAM  BURNET. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1319,  April  n,  1768. 

We  hear  from  Burlington,  that  Benjamin  Swett,  jun. 
Esq;  is  appointed  Recorder  of  that  City,  in  the  Room  of 
Richard  Smith,  Esq;  resigned. 

On  the  sixth  Instant,  departed  this  Life  Edward  Ton- 
kin, Esq;  of  Burlington  County,  in  New-Jersey ±  a  Gentle- 
man, who  will  long  be  remembered  with  Esteem  and  Re- 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  137 

gret,  by  as  many  as  had  the  Pleasure  to  know  him. — We 
hear  that  he  has  left  a  handsome  Legacy  to  St.  Mary's 
Church  in  Burlington. 

RuN-away  on  the  23d  of  March,  1768,  a  Dutch  Ser- 
vant Man,  named  Jacob  Holler,  about  five  feet  six  inches 
high,  aged  about  thirty  years,  commonly  wears  a  cap,  and 
the  fore  part  of  his  head  shaved;  had  on,  a  light-coloured 
fustian  coat,  a  black  jacket  and  good  leather  breeches,  apt 
to  drink  and  be  quarrelsome.  He  run  from  Edward  Ton- 
kin, and  is  since  become  the  property  of  Robert  Taylour, 
in  the  township  of  Woolwich,  county  of  Gloucester,  in 
Newr-Jersey.  The  said  servant  took  with  him,  a  small 
sorrel  mare,  supposed  to  be  at  or  near  the  Crooked  Billet, 
about  fourteen  miles  below  Bristol.  Whoever  takes  up  the 
said  servant,  and  brings  him  to  his  said  master,  shall  have 
FORTY  SHILLINGS  reward,  and  reasonable  charges, 
paid  by  me, 

ROBERT  TAYLOUR. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  66,  April  11-18, 
1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  April  14 

From  Greenwich,  in  Cumberland  County,  New  Jersey, 
we  learn,  that  on  the  Sixth  Instant,  a  Boy  was  killed,  as 
he  was  taking  a  Pair  of  Oxen  from  the  Cart's  Tongue,  by 
the  Team's  suddenly  taking  Fright. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette,  No.  2051,  April  14,  1768. 

The  CENTINEL,  No.  IV.1 

THE  subscriber  intending  to  remove  in  a  few  weeks  to 
the  country,  requests  all  those  indebted  to  him  by  bond  or 
otherwise,  to  make  immediate  payment;  and  if  there  be 

i  Two  columns. 


138  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [  I  J 68 

any  that  he  is  indebted  to,  they  are  desired  to  call  forth- 
with and  receive  their  just  demand.  He  has  to  lett  or  sell, 
the  large  and  commodious  house  he  now  dwells  in,  neatly 
finished,  and  pleasantly  situated  on  the  highest  part  of 
Second  street,  opposite  Almond-street.  It  commands  a 
beautiful  and  extensive  view  of  the  river  Delaware  and 
all  the  vessels  that  pass  and  repass ;  the  Jerseys,  &c.  '  The 
lot  on  which  the  house  stands  is  large,  extending  from 

Second  to  George' s-street Apply  to 

JOHN  MALCOLM. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.   1323,  April  14, 
1768. 

The  Office  to  zvhich  Benjamin  Swett,  jun.  Esq;  is  ap- 
pointed, is  Recorder  of  Deeds  for  the  City  and  County  of 
Burlington. 

South-Ambcy,  April  9,  1768. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  an  indented  Servant, 
named  William  Rynan,  a  weaver  by  trade,  came  from 
Ireland  about  20  months  ago,  but  born  in  Scotland;  about 
5  feet  8  inches  high,  well  set,  round  shouldered,  a  good 
deal  pitted  with  the  small-pox,  speaks  pretty  broad;  had 
on  when  he  went  off,  a  blue  broadcloth  coat,  a  brown 
homespun  waistcoat  and  brown  broadcloth  breeches,  a 
coarse  wool  hat,  with  blue  binding  round  it.  The  other 
things  not  particularly  known.  He  is  supposed  to  have 
made  his  way  for  Philadelphia,  as  he  mentioned  some  re- 
lation living  there.  Whoever  will  take  him  up  and  con- 
fine him  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  gaols,  shall  be  paid  Five 
Dollars,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  by 

JOHN  L.  JOHNSTON. 

Salern,  April  17,  1768. 
THE  Creditors  of  Doctor  JOHN  BUDD,  late  of  Salem, 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 39 

are  requested  to  send  their  Accounts  to  the  Auditors,  ap- 
pointed by  Court  for  the  Settlement  of  his  Affairs,  that 
they  may  receive  their  Dividend  of  his  Estate. 

ROBERT  WILLSON, 
GRANT  GIBBON, 
SAMUEL  DICK. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  67,  April  18-25, 
1768. 

Neiv-York,  April  18.  Between  the  Hours  of  Twelve 
and  one  o' Clock  last  Wednesday,  a  terrible  Fire  broke  out 
in  the  Dwelling-House  of  the  Widow  Dilldine,  in  Bruns- 
wick, New- Jersey,  which  consumed  the  same,  with  the 
Dwelling-House  and  Bake-House  of  Mr.  John  Van  Nor- 
da,  jun.  adjoining  thereto,  in  a  very  short  Time.  The 
wind  being  high,  the  Flames  soon  reached  across  the 
Street,  and  set  fire  to  the  House  of  James  Nealson,  Esq; 
which  was  also  soon  consumed,  with  his  2  Store-Houses, 
a  Cooper's  Shop,  and  Bolting  House,  wherein  was  a  large 
Quantity  of  all  Sorts  of  Country  Produce  to  a  very  great 
Amount.  The  Dwelling-House,  and  Store  of  Mr.  Peter 
Vredenberg,  and  the  Widow  Carmer's,  were  also  burnt, 
as  they  adjoined  Mr.  Nealson's  Buildings,  with  almost 
every  Thing  that  was  therein.  In  short  the  Loss  is  very 
considerable.  The  Inhabitants,  joined  by  the  Military, 
used  their  utmost  Efforts,  to  extinguish  the  Fire,  but  the 
Wind  being  so  very  high,  could  effect  it  by  no  other 
Method  than  pulling  down  some  Buildings  in  its  Way, 
by  which  it  was  happily  accomplished.  Not  one  Person 
was  hurt  during  the  whole  Affair. 

How  the  Fire  began  is  not  well  known,  but  supposed 
to  be  occasioned  either  by  some  Sparks  from  Mr.  Van 
Norda's  Bake-House,  or  from  the  Chimney  of  the  House 
of  Mrs.  Dilldine. 


I4O  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

At  the  Time  Mr.  Nealson's  Dwelling-House  was  on 
Fire,  he  with  some  of  his  Friends,  were  about  two  Miles 
out  of  Town  at  his  Mills  that  were  in  Danger  of  being  set 
a  Fire  by  the  burning  the  Woods. 

This  City  has  been  alarmed  no  less  than  19  Times  by 
Fire  within  the  Space  of  about  20  Days. 

Mr.  Bond's  House  between  Newark  and  Elizabeth- 
Town  and  Mr.  William  Nicoll's  House,  and  Barn,  at 
Freehold,  were  burnt  the  same  Day;  and  the  House  of 
Mr.  John  Johnson  and  William  Burnet,  of  Amboy,  both 
took  Fire  the  same  Day  also,  but  were  happily  extin- 
guished, without  doing  any  Damage. 

We  hear  from  Shrewsbury,  in  New-Jersey,  that  the 

Week  before  last,  one  Mr.  of  that  Place,  being 

plied  with  strong  Liquor  by  three  Females,  till  he  was 
much  intoxicated,  they  then  proceeded  very  deliberately 

to  deprive  him  of  his  Manhood  by  C n,  which  they 

effectually  performed.  The  Crime  he  was  charged  with, 
was  for  depriving  his  Wife  of  Favours  that  he  bountifully 
lavished  upon  his  Neighbours.  The  Operators  were,  his 
Wife,  his  Wife's  Mother,  and  one  other  Woman.  He  is 
in  a  fair  Way  of  recovering,  and  the  Women  are  all  in 
Custody. 

To  be  SOLD, 

THE  pleasantly  situated  House  and  Lot,  of  Captain 
James  Gray,  at  Newark,  on  the  Banks  of  Passaick  River, 
opposite  the  Estate  of  Capt.  Kennedy,  at  Peterborough; 
the  House  is  extremely  convenient  and  comfortable,  there 
is  a  good  Stable,  Coach-house,  Barn,  and  every  other  Ap- 
pendage proper  for  a  Gentleman's  Country  Seat,  there 
are  20  Acres  of  excellent  good  Land  adjoining,  6  Acres 
in  Grass,  and  fit  for  the  Scythe,  the  whole  is  now  in  good 
Fence,  and  an  Orchard  of  upwards  of  300  Apple-Trees, 
with  a  well  chosen  Collection  of  other  Fruit:  there  is 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  M1 

belonging  to  the  Premises,  a  Dock  very  convenient  and 
well  calculated  for  Ship-Building  particularly;  a  Ship  of 
300  Tons  Burthen,  was  not  long  since  launched  from  it. 
The  above  House  commands  a  fine  Prospect  of  the  River 
Passaick,  for  a  long  Distance  up  and  down  the  same,  it 
overlooks  a  great  Part  of  Captain  Kennedys  Farm,  es- 
pecially his  Deer  Park,  &c.  There  will  also  be  sold  with 
the  above  House  and  Lot,  9  Acres  of  excellent  Wood 
Land,  superior  to  any  in  the  Neighbourhood,  and  has  been 
reserved  for  the  Use  of  the  Premises;  Enquire  of  Capt. 
James  Gray,  at  the  Little  Falls,1  or  Isaac  Ogden,  Esq;  in 
Newark,  or  of  Cornelius  Low,  Junior,  Esq;  at  New- 
Brunswick. 

THE  subscriber,  who  has  taught  the  classicks,  and  most 
useful  branches  of  the  mathematicks,  upwards  of  seven 
years  at  Bound-Brook, "humbly  begs  leave  to  acquaint  the 
publick  that  he  is  now  mov'd  to  Newark,  where  he  pur- 
poses to  open  school  about  the  loth  of  May,  and  teach  as 
above;  he  begs  leave  to  return  his  most  grateful  thanks 
to  those  gentlemen  and  ladies  who  have  formerly  been 
pleased  to  honour  him  with  the  care  of  their  children. 
Any  gentlemen  or  ladies  who  are  pleased  to  favour  him 
for  the  future,  may  depend  upon  his  utmost  care  and  as- 
siduity, and  know  the  terms  of  board  and  education,  by 
applying  to  Mr.  Stephen  Dwight,  carver,  in  New- York, 
or  H.  Gaine,  and  from  the 
Publick's  most  obedient, 
much  obliged,  and 

Very  humble  Servant,    WILLIAM  HADDON 

Newark,  April  18,  1768 

iCapt.  James  Gray  had  iron  works  at  Little  Falls,  on  the  Passaic 
river,  utilizing-  the  water  power,  and  raising  the  dam.  He  took  the 
side  of  the  British  in  the  Revolution,  and  his  property  above  Newark 
was  forfeited  to  the  State.  t 

s  See  N.   J.   Archives,  XX.,   548,   562. 


142  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

To  be  SOLD, 

A  Plantation  lying  in  Waykake,  in  Middletown,  in 
New- Jersey;  containing  about  160  Acres,  whereon  is  a 
good  Dwelling-House,  3  Rooms  on  a  Floor;  it  is  well 
water'd  and  timber'd,  and  about  30  Acres  of  clear  Land 
and  about  8  or  9  Acres  of  Salt  Meadow,  all  the  rest 
Woods,  and  a  large  Range  for  Cattle;  there  is  also  on  it 
a  large  Quantity  of  Pine,  either  for  Docking  or  Sawing, 
is  within  a  Mile  of  a  Saw  and  Gristmill,  and  is  very  con- 
venient to  carry  Wood  to  New- York,  within  a  Mile  of  a 
Landing,  from  which  a  Boat  may  go  all  Winter,  and  not 
freeze  up.  On  the  West  Side  it  is  bound  by  a  Creek, 
where  it  is  very  convenient  for  carrying  Logs  or  Cord- 
wood,  there  is  also  a  great  Quantity  of  Cole  Wood  on  it, 
and  Wood  to  fill  in  Docks,  and  a  good  deal  of  Fresh 
Meadow  can  be  made;  there  is  a  good  Spring  about  4 
Rods  from  the  House,  and  about  60  or  70  bearing  Apple- 
Trees,  and  a  Nursery  of  about  100  more,  and  is  good  Land 
to  raise  Rye  or  Indian  Corn  on.  Any  Person  inclining  to 
buy  the  same,  may  have  it  at  reasonable  Payments,  and 
may  move  on  it  immediately.  They  may  for  further  Par- 
ticulars enquire  of  Andrew  Wilson,  Junior,  near  the 
Premises,  or  Daniel  Hendrickson,  Senior,  at  Middletown, 
who  will  give  a  good  Title  for  the  same. — The  New  York 
Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  859,  April  18,  1768. 

New-York,  April  18.  At  the  Supreme  Court  held  at 
Perth- Amboy,  on  Thursday  the  7th  instant,  came  on  the 
famous  Trial  of  Traverse  of  an  Indictment  found  by  a 
Grand  Jury  in  September  Term,  1766,  against  the  Jus- 
tices and  Freeholders  of  the  County  of  Middlesex,  charg- 
ing them  with  the  Crime  of  raising  divers  Sums  of  Money 
on  the  Inhabitants  of  the  County,  and  that  great  part 
thereof  so  raised,  they  ha€  illegally  applied  to  discharge 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  143 

and  pay  their  own  Expences ;   against  the  Form  of  an  Act 
of  the  Governor,  Council  and  General  Assembly,  &c. 

Upon  this  Trial  it  must  be  confessed,  the  Defendants 
laboured  under  certain  great  Disadvantages,  besides  the 
Dexerity  and  sanguine  Efforts  of  the  Attorney  General 
were  displayed  and  pushed  to  the  utmost  in  this  Matter. 
But  from  a  just  Exertion  of  the  Abilities  of  the  Attornies, 
who  spoke  on  the  Part  of  the  Defendants,  as  well  as  from 
the  Verdict  of  a  virtuous  Jury,  who  did  Honour  to  their 
Country,  and  who  themselves  must  have  been  injured,  if 
the  Charge  had  been  just,  the  said  Justices  and  Freehold- 
ers were  honourably  acquitted ;  and  it  may  be  said  to  the 
Satisfaction  of  the  rest  of  the  Inhabitants,  equally  con- 
cerned in  Interest,  if  any,  or  the  least  Part  of  the  Charge 
had  been  true:  Upon  the  Whole  there  appeared  great 
Malignity  in  this  Prosecution. 

The  cold  dry  Weather  we  have  lately  had,  has  been  at- 
tended with  bad  Consequences  to  many  in  the  Country, 
by  the  Loss  of  Cattle,  &c.  but  the  usual  Practice  of  burning 
of  Woods  and  Meadows  in  the  Spring,  has  been  more  so 
than  usual ;  for  we  are  assured,  that  near  Mount  Holly, 
in  Burlington  County,  three  Dwelling-Houses,  and  much 
Fencing  have  been  destroyed  by  Fire  on  Wednesday  last, 
besides  other  great  Damages :  And  in  the  Event  has  been 
detrimental  to  those  who  would  probably  have  been  out 
of  the  Reach  of  such  Fires  otherways. 

On  Wednesday  last,  a  dreadful  fire  broke  out  in  the 
Dwelling  House  of  the  Widow  Dildine,  in  the  City  of 
New-Brunswick;  which  catch'd,  as  its  said,  thro'  a  Crev- 
ice in  the  Chimney,  and  the  Wind  being  very  high,  in  a 
few  Minutes  spread  to  the  Houses  to  Leeward  of  it.  Mr. 
Neilson's  Houses,  Stores,  and  almost  all  his  Effects,  were 
consumed,  to  the  Value  of  several  Thousand  Pounds  :  Mr, 


144  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

Neilson  himself  'tis  said,  was  abroad,  trying  to  prevent 
some  of  the  spreading  Fire  in  the  Woods  from  reaching 
his  Mills,  so  that  on  his  Return  he  saw  the  melancholy 
Sight.  Above  2000  Bushels  of  Wheat,  many  Barrels  of 
Flour,  a  large  parcel  of  Gammons,  with  near  1000  Bush- 
els of  Corn,  were  burnt  in  his  Stores.  The  Dwelling- 
House  of  John  Van  Norden,  Baker,  with  much  Bread  and 
Cornel  were  destroyed;  also  the  Dwelling-Houses  of 
Peter  Vredenburgh  and  the  Widow  Carmer  were  con- 
sumed; both  of  whom  are  great  Sufferers;  and  several 
other  Houses  were  much  damaged.  The  Fire  flew  quite 
across  the  River,  and  set  Fields  afire  there,  which  was  with 
difficulty  extinguish!.  The  Officers  of  the  Army  there, 
and  the  Inhabitants  did  all  that  was  possible  for  Men  to 
do  upon  such  an  Occasion. 

The  same  Day  a  House  of  Thomas  Fitzrandolph,  in 
Piscataway,  catched  on  Fire,  but  happily  extinguished 
without  much  Damage. 

The  same  Day,  no  less  than  three  Houses  catch'd  on 
Fire  at  Amboy,  but  being  timely  discovered,  were  hap- 
pily extinguished. 

The  same  Day  the  House  of  one  Bond,  between  Eliza- 
beth-Town and  Newark,  was  consumed  by  Fire,  with 
much  other  Damage. — The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  No.  1320,  April  18,  1768, 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Tract  of  land,  situate  and  being  in  Freehold,  in  the 
county  of  Monmouth,  in  New- Jersey,  containing  upwards 
of  six  hundred  acres,  and  lies  in  such  a  manner  that  it 
may  be  divided  so  as  to  make  three  settlements  or  conve- 
nient farms;  one  of  which  contains  near  one  hundred 
acres,  between  forty  and  fifty  of  which  is  cleared,  and 
another  part  of  said  tract  containing  about  two  hundred 
and  twenty  acres,  upwards  of  one  hundred  acres  of  which 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  145 

is  cleared,  having  a  young  orchard  of  the  same;  the  re- 
maining part  of  said  tract  containing  about  three  hundred 
acres,  having  on  the  same  a  good  dwelling  house  and 
barn,  about  four  hundred  apple  trees,  and  about  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  or  seventy  acres  of  which  is  cleared.  Each 
of  said  parts  or  parcels  of  land  has  plenty  of  good  meadow 
and  timber.  Any  person  that  inclines  to  buy,  may  have 
the  whole  or  either  of  the  said  parts  above-mentioned  on 
reasonable  terms,  by  applying  unto  the  subscriber  hereof. 

JOHN  ANDERSON. 

— The  New  York"  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1320,  April  21,  1768. 

WHEREAS  some  time  in  the  Month  of  January  last, 
Martha  King,  of  Manington,  in  the  County  of  Salem, 
West  New-Jersey,  obtained  an  Obligation  of  me  the  Sub- 
scriber, of  Upper  Penn's  Neck,  in  the  County  aforesaid, 
for  the  Sum  of  Sixty  Pounds,  conditioned  for  the  Pay- 
ment of  Thirty  Pounds,  to  be  paid  Five  Pounds  the  3Oth 
of  April  next;  Five  Pounds  the  3Oth  of  November  fol- 
lowing; Ten  Pounds  the  3Oth  of  November  1769,  and 
Ten  Pounds  the  3<Dth  of  November  1770;  but  as  said 
Bond  was  fraudulently  obtained,  I  do  give  this  public  No- 
tice to  all  Persons,  not  to  take  any  Assignment  of  said 
Obligation,  for  I  will  not  pay  any  Money  upon  it. 

March  10,  1768  THOMAS  ALLEN. 

PHILADELPHIA,  April  21. 

Captain  Allibone,  from  St.  Croix — on  the  I5th,  about 
20  Leagues  S.  S.  of  our  Capes, — spoke  a  sloop  from  Egg 
Harbour  for  the  West  Indies. 

Extract  of  a  Letter,  from  New  Brunswick,  April  14, 
1768. 

"A  very  heavy  Misfortune  happened  here  Yesterday  to 

10 


146  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

several  Families.  Between  two  and  three  o' Clock  in  the 
Afternoon  a  Fire  broke  through  the  Roof  of  the  Widow 
Dildine's  House,  which  by  the  Force  of  an  exceeding  high 
Wind  communicated,  in  an  Instant,  to  the  House  of  John 
Van  Norden,  jun.  Peter  Vredenberg's  House  and  Store, 
Mr.  Bardin's  House,  and  James  Nelson,  Esquire's  House, 
and  all  his  Stores.  And  as  the  Attending  of  the  Inhabi- 
tants was  chiefly  given  to  prevent  the  Flames  from  con- 
suming the  whole  Town,  not  only  the  Houses  and  Stores 
abovementioned,  but  the  greatest  Part  of  the  Furniture 
and  Goods  therein  were  consumed.-  Mr.  Nelson's  Loss  is 
very  great,  -  •  -  -  exceeding,  as  it  is  reported,  Eight 
Thousand  Pounds.  In  him  the  Distressed  had  always  a 
sure  Resource,  and  the  Country  a  faithful  Merchant.  In- 
deed his  Loss  will  greatly  affect  the  whole  Town.  It  was 
with  the  utmost  Difficulty  that  the  Town  was  saved,  as 
the  Houses  are  built  with  Frames  and  Cedar  Roofs.  The 
Officers  of  the  Army,  with  the  Soldiers  quartered  here, 
exerted  themselves  in  a  very  particular  Manner,  and  did 
great  Service.  The  burning  Shingles  were  carried  by 
the  Violence  of  the  Wind  across  the  River,  and  communi- 
cated to  a  Wood,  half  a  Mile  distant,  which  soon  de- 
stroyed all  the  Fence  in  its  Way  for  about  two  Miles  in 
Piscataway,  and  it  was  with  Difficulty  the  Inhabitants 
saved  several  Buildings  in  the  Course  of  the  raging 
Flames." 

We  hear  from  Mountholly,  that  Yesterday  Se'nnight, 
a  Fire  broke  out  in  a  Brew-House  belonging  to  Mr. 
Thomas  Cooper,  of  that  Place,  which  entirely  consumed 
the  same,  with  all  the  Materials  and  Stock  therein.  The 
Fire  communicated  itself  to  a  Barn,  and  Blacksmith's 
Shop,  which  were  burnt  to  the  Ground 

BY  virtue  of  sundry  writs  of  Venditioni  Exponas,  and 
other  processes,  to  me  directed,  zvill  be  exposed  to  sale, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  147 

by  public  vendue,  at  the  Court-house,  in  the  county  of 
Sussex,  in  New-Jersey,  on  Friday,  the  third  day  of  June 
next,  betzveen  the  hours  of  12  and  5  in  the  afternoon,  the 
following  tracts  and  pieces  of  land,  viz.  One  lot,  opposite 
Sussex  Courthouse,  whereon  is  a  large  frame  dwelling- 
house  and  kitchen,  with  every  conveniency  for  a  tavern, 
wherein  Ephraim  Darby  now  lives;  said  lot  contains  two 
acres  and  a  half.  One  other  lot  adjoining  of  twenty  acres, 
mostly  meadow  ground.  One  other  lot,  nearly  adjoining 
the  last  mentioned,  containing  six  acres,  in  possession  of 
Jacob  Winans.  One  other  lot,  containing  sixty  acres,  in 
possession  of  Jacob  Reader.  One  other  lot,  containing  150 
acres,  in  possession  of  James  Patton.  One  other  lot,  con- 
taining about  half  an  acre  whereon  is  a  genteel  stone 
house,  in  the  possession  of  John  Pettit.  Two  other  lots 
lying  in  the  Forks  of  Pequess,  about  four  miles  from  Sus- 
sex Court-house,  containing  about  150  acres,  in  posses- 
sion of  James  Wilgoss,  and  Moses  Burgis.  One  other 
tract  of  valuable  land,  nozv  in  possession  of  the  widow 
Kennedy,  containing  ijo  acres;  together  zmth  all  the  real 
estate  of  Ephraim  Darby;  seised  and  taken  in  execution 
at  the  suit  of  John  Stole,  and  others,  and  to  be  sold  by 

JOHN  PETTIT,  Coroner. 

Sussex  County,  March  26,  1768. 

MADE  his  Escape  on  Thursday  Evening,  the  24th  In- 
stant, out  of  the  Goal  of  this  County,  a  certain  English- 
man, named  THOMAS  BEAL,  about  35  Years  of  Age,  about 
5  Feet  6  Inches  high :  Had  light  coloured  Hair,  tied  be- 
hind, thin  fair  Complexion,  remarkable  large  full  blue 
Eyes,  he  is  well  dressed,  with  a  brown  Broadcloth  Coat, 
lapelled  Jacket  and  Breeches  of  the  same,  a  Castor  Hat, 
half  worn,  brown  Stockings;  he  took  with  him  some 
Check  Shirts,  Stockings  and  Jackets-  Whoever  secures 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

the  said  Beal  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  Goals  in  this  Prov- 
ince, or  brings  him  to  Sussex  Court  House,  shall  receive 
the  Sum  of  Five  Pounds,  Proclamation  Money,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

JACOB  STARN,  Sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2052,  April  21, 
1768. 

The  CENTINEL,  No.  V. 

IN  my  last  I  began  to  examine"  the  peaceable  and  gentle 
Spirit  of  the  Church  of  England,  and  now  shall  endeavour 
to  trace  it  a  little  farther.  The  Canons  of  your  Church, 
Dr.  Chandler,  do  not  seem  to  us  to  breath  a  very  gentle 
Spirit 

What  a  Pity  it  is  that  the  penal  Laws  formerly  executed 
in  England  and  Ireland  against  Dissenters,  are  not  in 
force  in  America;  and  that  spiritual  Courts  aided  by  the 
secular  Arm  are  not  introduced  to  restore  primitive  Dis- 
cipline. Then  might  we  see  some  more  success  follow 
the  good  Doctors  labours  among  the  Heathen  in,  and 
about  Elizabeth  Town;  and  refractory  Quakers,  Baptists 
and  Presbyterians,  who  never  claimed  any  relation  to  the 
CHURCH,  solemnly  cast  out  of  it,  and  brought  to  due  obe- 
dience by  fines,  imprisonments  and  outlawry.  Then,  in- 
deed, might  there  be  some  good  prospect,  "that  the  word 
"of  God  would  mightily  grow  and  prevail"  in  New- Jer- 
sey, &c.  as  well  as  "New-England,  according  to  the  Lit- 
"urgy  of  the  Church  of  England/'  .  .  .  -1 

[signed]     Z. 

NEW- YORK,  April  18. 

Mr.  Bond's  house  between  Newark  and  Elizabeth 
Town  and  Mr.  William  Nicholl's  house,  and  barn,  at 
Freehold,  were  burnt  the  same  day;  and  the  houses  of 

i  Two  and  a  half  columns. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  149 

Mr.  John  Johnson  and  William  Burnet,  of  Amboy,  both 
took  fire  the  same  day  also,  but  were  happily  extinguished, 
without  doing  any  damage. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal, 
No.  1324,  April  21,  1768. 

TO   BE   SOLD, 

A  VALUABLE  PLANTATION,,  in  Cumberland  county, 
West-New- Jersey,  on  the  south  side  of  Cohansey  creek, 
containing  528  acres,  fifty  of  which  are  drained  meadow, 
and  150  acres  good  salt  meadow;  two  orchards  of  the 
best  fruit,  two  dwelling  houses,  all  in  good  repair — the 
title  indisputable.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  may 
know  the  conditions,  by  applying  to  WILLIAM  CONNER, 
on  the  premises. 

New-York,  April  25.  A  Brew-House,  at  Mount-holly, 
in  New-Jersey,  belonging  to  Mr.  Thomas  Cooper,  of  that 
Place,  was  consumed  on  Wednesday  the  I3th  Instant,  the 
Day  the  Fire  broke  out  at  Brunswick. 

We  have  the  following  Paragraph  from  the  public 
Prints,  not  before  published. 

The  Revd.  Dr.  JOHN  WEATHERSPOONE,  a  very  learned, 
pious,  and  eminent  Divine  of  the  Church  of  Scotland,  is 
appointed  President  of  the  College  of  New- Jersey,  and  is 
going  over  this  Spring  by  Way  of  New  -York,  to  fill  up 
that  important  Place. 

COVERS, 

At  Mr.  Clark's,  Tavern-Keeper,  in  Elizabeth-Town,  at 
8  Dollars  for  the  Season,  and  half  a  Dollar  to  the 
Groom,  the  Money  for  those  Mares  that  do  not  re- 
main with  the  Horse  during  the  Time  of  covering,  to 
be  paid  at  the  Stable  Door ;  and  those  that  do  remain 
with  the  Horse,  must  be  paid  for  on  the  taking  away 
of  the  Mare : 


150  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

The  fine  BAY  HORSE, 

CALLED, 
OLD  ENGLAND 

Bred  by,  and  purchased  of  John 

Holme,  Esq;  of  Carlisle,  in 

Cumberland. 

HE  is  a  Horse  of  Size,  Strength,  and  Beauty,  Nine 
Years  old,  and  was  got  by  Young  Sterling;  his  Dam  by 
Regulus,  his  Grandam  by  Roundhead,  a  Son  of  Flying 
Childers,  (the  fleetest  Horse  that  ever  started)  his  Gran- 
dam  by  Old  Partner;  her  Dam  by  Makeless;  her  Gran- 
dam  by  Brimmer,  out  of  Trumpet's  Dam,  which  was  got 
by  Place's  White  Turk;  her  Dam  by  Dodsworth,  out  of 
a  Layton  Barb  Mare.  Young  Sterling  was  got  by  Old 
Sterling,  out  of  Matchin's  Dam.  Witness  my  Hand  John 
Holem. 

It  may  not  be  improper  to  illustrate  the  Pedigree  of  this 
Horse,  with  some  Observations,  which  are  but  little  known 
in  this  Country.  "His  Sire  and  Grandsire,  were  remark- 
able for  getting  more  beautiful  Stock,  than  any  other 
Horses :  The  Character  of  Old  Sterling,  as  a  Stallion, 
will  never  be  forgotten,  as  long  as  the  Capital  Perfor- 
mances of  his  Sons,  Teaser,  Torrismond,  and  Martin- 
dale's  Sterling,  can  be  remembered.  Regulus,  (the  Sire 
of  Old  England's  Dam)  was  got  by  the  Godolphin  Ara- 
bbian;  his  Dam  by  the  celebrated  Bald  Gallaway,  Son  of 
St.  Victor's  Barb;  in  the  Course  of  one  Year,  he  won  a 
£.  50  Prize,  and  eight  King's  Plates  of  an  100  Guineas 
each;  to  effect  which,  he  travelled  4000  Miles,  and  beat 
all  the  Horses  that  started  against  him.  Such  a  Series  of 
Victories  never  were  acquired  by  any  Racer,  (his  own  Son 
Careless  excepted,  who  in  the  same  Space  also  won  eight 
Royal  Plates.)  He  left  the  TURF  INVINCIBLE,  and  in  one 
single  Season  gained  £.  1000  in  the  Capacity  of  a  Stallion. 


I768J  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  I$I 

It  is  needless  to  enlarge  upon  the  Merits  of  OLD  ENG- 
LAND'S Ancestors,  as  every  one  that  is  acquainted  with 
Pedigree  pronounces  the  highest  Encomiums  upon  the 
Remembrance  of  the  Godolphin  Arabian,  Old  Partner, 
Makeless,  Brimmer,  Dods worth  and  Machien." — The 
New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  860,  April 
2$,  1768. 

To  be  LET  for  ONE  YEAR, 
And  entered  on  immediately, 

THE  pleasantly  situated  and  conve- 
CUT      -\         nient  dwelling  house,  and  lot  of  Philip 
Van  Cortlandt,  at  Newark;   the  house 
OF  is  new  and  large,  being  two   stories 

high,  with  four  good  rooms  on  each 
"  floor,  a  large  kitchen,  barn,  stable,  and 

garden  adjoining:  There  may  be  cut 
hay  enough  off  the  lot  for  a  horse  and  two  cows,  besides 
pasturing  for  them  for  the  summer;  there  is  also  on  the 
lot,  a  number  of  apple  trees,  that  bear  fruit  sufficient  for 
the  use  of  a  family :  The  whole  extremely  well  contrived 
and  calculated  for  a  gentleman's  country  seat;  especially 
as  it  is  only  the  short  distance  of  eight  miles  from  New- 
York,  to  which  place  a  stage  waggon  goes  from  Newark 
every  day  in  the  week  during  the  summer  season,  (except 
Sunday)  and  four  times  in  a  week  during  the  winter  sea- 
son; the  house  is  three  hundred  yards  distant  from  the 
Passaick-river,  and  about  half  that  distance  from  the  Eng- 
lish church.  For  further  particulars,  inquire  of  Philip 
Van  Cortlandt,  at  Jamaica,  on  L,  Island;  Messrs  Lud- 
low  and  Hoffman,  in  New- York;  or  Isaac  Ogden,  esq; 
at  Newark. 

April  22d,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1321,  April  28,  1768. 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

RUN  away,  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  the  city  of 
Burlington,  on  the  eleventh  of  this  instant  April,  at  Night, 
a  Negroe  Man,  named  Jack  Hammond;  he  is  about  5  feet 
8  inches  high,  his  nose  remarkably  large  and  sharp :  Had 
on,  when  he  went  away,  a  striped  cotton  cap,  a  blue  duffil 
jacket,  and  a  light  coloured  jacket  under  it,  blue  duffil 
trowsers,  light  blue  yarn  stockings,  ozenbrigs  shirt,  good 
shoes,  an  old  felt  hat,  with  a  yellow  button  on  it:  He 
took  with  him,  a  large  carving  knife.  Whoever  appre- 
hends and  secures  said.  Negroe  in  any  goal,  so  that  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  receive  Thirty  Shillings 
reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

JOSEPH  HAIGHT. 

The  following,  it  is  supposed,  was  designed  for  our  last, 
one  of  the  Courts  being  over,  before  it  was  received. 

The  Circuit  Courts  in  New-Jersey  are  appointed  to  be 
held ;  For  the  County  of  Cumberland,  Tuesday,  April  26. 
Salem,  Thursday,  April  28.  Gloucester,  Monday,  May 
2.  Cape-May  Friday,  May  6.  Hunterdon,  Tuesday,  May 
17.  Sussex,  Tuesday,  May  24. 

LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post  Office,  Philadelphia. 

C.     John  Covenhoven,  Pilesgrove,  N.  Jersey. 

I.     Abraham  Inskeep,  Jersey 

R.  Richard  Renshaw,  Gloucester  Point;  Dr.  Alex- 
ander Ross,  Mount-Holly. 

S.  Charles  Stewart,  Kingwood,  N.  Jersey — The 
Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2053,  April  28,  1768. 

[The  Centinel,  No.  VI.  with  letter  from  A.  B.  "who 
considers  the  Manner  in  which  our  civil  Liberties  must  be 
violated,  by  this  scheme  of  an  American  Episcopate."] 

To  BE  LETT, 
THREE  lotts  of  ground,  situated  at  the  New  Mills,  West 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  153 

New-Jersey,  about  6  miles  from  Mount-Holly,  on  one  of 
which  is  erected  a  good  two  story  brick  house,  with  a 
good  cellar,  a  store  with  every  other  out  house  necessary 
for  a  store  keeper;  and  if  it  should  suit,  an  orchard  with 
100  apple  trees,  about  30  acres  of  upland  and  7  acres  of 
meadow  adjoining,  may  be  had,  with  the  above  lotts.  The 
above  has  been  a  noted  store,  and  there  is  no  store  nigher 
than  Mount-Holly. 

For  Terms  apply  to  WILLIAM  BUDD  near  the  above 
premises. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1325,  April 
28,  1768. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Salem  county, 
West-New-Jersey,  a  Dutch  servant  man,  named  Charles 
Geisinger;  he  is  five  feet  two  inches  high,  and  about 
thirty  two  years  of  age,  has  a  brown  complexion  and 
black  short  hair.  Had  on,  when  he  went  away,  a  double 
breasted  swanskin  jacket,  with  black  spots'  and  brown 
mohair  buttons,  also  a  brown  linen  one  over  it,  a  pair  of 
half- worn  linen  breeches,  light  blue  coarse  stockings,  a 
pair  of  half-worn  shoes,  with  brass  buckles,  and  a  very 
small  cut  hat.  Whoever  takes  up  said  servant  man,  and 
secures  him,  in  any  gaol,  or  brings  him  to  the  Subscriber, 
shall  have  TEN  DOLLARS  Reward,  and  reasonable  charges, 
paid  by  me, 

GEORGE  MILLER. 

The  SPEECH  of  his  Excellency  WILLIAM  FRANK- 
LIN, Esq;  Captain  General,  and  Commander  in  Chief 
in  and  over  the  Province  of  Nezv-Jersey  and  Territories 
thereon  depending  in  America,  Chancellor  and  Vice- 
Admiral  in  the  same,  &c.  to  the  General  Assembly  of 
the  said  Province  convened  at  Perth  Amboy. l 

i  Printed  in  N.  J.   Archives,   XVII.,   466-471. 


154  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l/68 

Our  Correspondent,  who  advised  us  that  Benjamin 
Swett,  jun.  Esq;  was  appointed  to  the  Office  of  Recorder 
of  Deeds,  it  seems  was  mistaken;  that  Gentleman  being 
appointed  Recorder  of  the  City  of  Burlington,  as  men- 
tioned in  No.  66  of  this  Paper. — The  Pennsylvania  Chron- 
icle, No.  68,  May  2,  1768. 

To  BE  SOLD. 

By  public  V endue,  on  Saturday  the  28th  day  of  this  in- 
stant, May,  at  one  o'clock  in  the  afternoon, 
A  Valuable  MERCHANT  MILL,  with  two  pair  of  stones? 
in  good  order,  three  bolting  cloths,  hoisting  jack  and  turn- 
ing lathe,  all  going  by  water;  also  a  good  dwelling-house, 
two  stories  high,  four  rooms  on  a  -floor,  and  three  in  the 
garret,  with  a  good  cellar  under  the  whole,  a  good  kitchen, 
with  a  well  of  water  at  the  door,  a  barn,  stables,  cow-house, 
pork-house,  smoak-house,  cooper' s-shop,  spring-house,  and 
a  house  for  the  miller  to  live  in;  with  about  one  hundred 
acres  of  land,  whereon  is  a  good  orchard,  and  about  forty 
acres  of  meadow;  the  whole  is  situated  in  the  township  of 
Nottingham,  in  the  county  of  Burlington,  on  a  branch  of 
Crosszvicks-creek,  called  Doctor' s-creek,  in  a  good  coun- 
try for  wheat  and  pork,  and  may  be  very  convenient  for  a 
merchant,  as  it  has  been  a  long  accustomed  place  for  a 
store.  There  is  a  good  landing,  within  one  mile  of  the 
mills,  on  the  premises,  where  a  shallop,  large  enough  to 
take  twenty-five  barrels  of  Hour,  may  be  conveniently 
loaded.  The  mills  are  in  good  repair,  situated  on  a  plenti- 
ful and  never  failing  stream  of  water,  four  miles  from 
Borden-town,  seven  from  Trenton,  two  from  Crosswicksf 
and  six  from  Allen-Town.  An  indisputable  title  will  be 
given  by  the  subscriber,  who  is  duly  impowered  to  sell  the 

same, 

ISAAC  ALLEN. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  155 

TV.  B.  The  conditions  of  the  sale  will  be  made  known 
at  the  time  and  place  abovesaid. — The  Pennsylvania 
Chronicle,  No.  69.  May  2-9,  1768. 

New-York,  May  2.  The  House  of  the  Widow  Martin, 
at  Lebanan,  in  Essex1  County,  New-Jersey,  and  the  Dur- 
ham Iron  Works,  near  that  Place,  were  burnt  on  the  same 
Day  that  the  Fire  happened  at  New-Brunswick. 

To  be  sold,  three  doors  below  Mr.  Leary's  livery  stables, 
in  Leary's  street,  a  variety  of 

New  SADLERY  WARE, 

AMONG  which  are  ladies  hunting  saddles,  with  hand- 
some housings  fring'd;  Burking' s  hunting  do.  with  doe- 
skin seats,  full  welted  hog-skin  do.  plain  hunting  do.  chair 
do.  and  two  neat  race  saddles;  they  are  all  made  of  the 

best  rivetted  trees  from  Elizabeth-Town 

FRANCIS  FATHERGILL. 

'- — The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
86 1,  May  2,  1768. 

A  New  Map  of  the  Province  of  New- York  and  New- 
Jersey,  with  Part  of  Pennsylvania,  and  the  Government 
of  Trois  Rivieres  and  Montreal,  drawn  by  Capt.  Holland, 
engraved  by  Thomas  Jeffries,  Geographer  to  his  Majesty; 
four  and  a  half  Feet  high,  Breadth  21  inches:  .  .  .  . 
Sold  by  G.  DUYCKINCK,  at  the  Universal  Store,  at  the 
Corner  of  the  Old  Slip-Market. — The  New  York  Journal 
or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1322,  May  5,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  May  5 

By  Captain  Noble,  from  Glasgow  we  have  Advice,  that 
the  Brig  Peggy,  Captain  Spier,  was  to  sail  from  thence 
for  this  Place  about  the  latter  end  of  April,  with  whom 

1  Hunterdon. 


156  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

are   coming   Passengers,   the   Rev.    Mr.   WITHERSPOON, 
President  of  the  New-Jersey  College,  and  his  Family. 

To  be  sold,  or  exchanged  for  a  small  Farm,  within  15 
or  20  Miles  of  Philadelphia 

A  VERY  valuable  and  well  situated  Plantation,  and  Tract 
of  Land,  in  the  Township  of  Allowray's  Creek,  County  of 
Salem,  and  Province  of  West-New-Jersey,  containing 
about  600  Acres,  with  good  Brick  Buildings,  Barn,  Out- 
houses, Orchard,  Timber,  wild  Marsh,  Meadow  Ground 
and  cleared  Land  in  Proportion,  and  every  other  Conve- 
niency,  either  for  producing  Grain,  or  grazing.  For  Par- 
ticulars, enquire  of  WILLIAM  HEWLINGS,  Esq;  in  Bur- 
lington; JOHN  HART,  in  Philadelphia;  JOSEPH  HART,  at 
Port  Penn;  EDWARD  TEST,  Esq;  in  Salem;  or  SAMUEL 
OAKFORD,  on  the  Premises. 

N.  B.  If  sold,  any  reasonable  Time  will  be  given  for 
Payment  of  the  Purchase-money,  giving  Security,  if  re- 
quired, and  paying  Interest. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  the  subscriber,  and  may  be  entered  on 

•    immediately. 

A  GOOD  HOUSE,  TANYARD,  and  well  improved  LOT,  of 
near  4  acres  of  land,  in  Haddonfield,  New-Jersey,  about  7 
miles  from  Philadelphia,  being  a  healthful  and  pleasant 
spot.  The  advantages  of  its  situation  for  procuring  the 
best  of  bark,  hides  and  large  Jersey  calf  skins,  in  great 
numbers,  is  thought  to  be  superior  to  most,  and  inferior 
to  none  in  Pennsylvania  or  the  Jerseys.  The  place  will  be 
sold  with  or  without  the  stock,  in  the  tanyard,  and  credit 
given  for  the  greatest  part  of  the  money,  the  purchaser 
paying  interest  for  the  same.  The  time  of  two  servants, 
tanners,  also  to  be  sold.  For  further  particulars,  apply  on 
the  premises  to  JOHN  LANGDALE. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2054,  May  5,  1768. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 57 

TheCENTINEL.    No.  VII. 
[Signed  A.  B.,  and  is  over  two  columns  long.] 

TO  BE  SOLD, 

A  Valuable  plantation  or  tract  of  land,  in  the  township 
of  New  Stafford,  and  county  of  Monmouth,  in  New- Jer- 
sey, containing  about  340  acres,  about  240  of  which  is 
cleared  and  in  good  fence.  100  of  good  salt  marsh,  40  of 
good  English  meadow,  100  of  upland,  and  the  rest  wood 
land;  there  is  on  the  premises,  a  good  two  story  house 
with  four  rooms  on  a  floor,  a  kitchen  adjoining,  a  large 
barn  and  other  out  houses,  a  number  of  good  young  apple 
trees,  a  well  of  good  water  at  the  door.  The  title  is  in- 
disputable. For  further  particulars  and  terms  of  sale, 
enquire  of  George  Haywood,  in  Evesham,  in  the  county 
of  Burlington,  or  to  Thomas  Haywood,  on  the  premises. 

ARRIVALS. 
Capt.  Smithhurst,  from  Salem,  at  Barbados. 

The  following  is  a  List  of  the  Masters  names,  &c.  who 
had  their  salt  taken  away  by  Capt.  Gregory,  of  his  Maj- 
esty's Ship  Scarborough  at  Tortuga. 
....    Capt.  Riker,  Capt.  Gregory  of  Piscataway,  from 
on  board  their  vessels  and  from  the  pond. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Chronicle,  No.  70,  May  9-16,  1768. 

London,  March  12.  They  write  from  Perth- Amboy,  in 
America,  that  many  hundred  yards  of  broad  cloth,  lately 
manufactured  there,  had  been  sold  at  public  vendue  for 
I2S.  sterling  per  yard,  esteemed  little  inferior  to  the  best 
English  drab. 

To  be  sold,  and  entered  upon  immediately, 
A  Tract  of  land  lying  in  Way  cake  creek,  in  Middletown, 


158  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Monmouth  county,  New- Jersey,  containing  by  estimation 
150  acres,  upland  and  meadows,  the  most  of  which  is 
wood-land,  and  affords  a  large  quantity  of  pine  timber  of 
all  sizes  and  lengths,  fitting  for  docking  or  other  uses,  and 
lays  adjoining  to  a  navigable  creek,  on  one  side,  and  open 
to  the  bay  on  the  other;  there  is  on  it  a  small  house,  near 
the  creek,  and  a  good  landing.-  It  has  been  noted  for  a 
good  place  to  keep  a  store,  having  a  good  country  of  able 
Farmers  about  it,  and  is  thought  a  store  open'd  now,  would 
meet  with  large  encouragement,  there  being  none  within 
less  than  8  miles;  Whoever  inclines  to  purchase,  may  ap- 
ply to  Mr.  Isaac  Conore,  in  New- York,  or  the  widow 
Sarah  Dennis,  living  near  the  premises,  who  will  agree 
on  reasonable  terms,  and  give  an  indisputable  title  to  the 
purchaser. — The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury, 
No.  862,  May  9,  1768. 

To  the  PUBLIC 

[Figure  of  stage  wagon,  drawn  by  four  horses.'] 
THAT  the  Stage- Waggons,  kept  by  John  Barnhill,  in 
Elm-Street,  in  Philadelphia,  and  John  Mercereau,  at  the 
New-Biasing  Star,  near  New-York,  continues  their  Stages 
in  two  Days,  from  Powles-Hook  Ferry,  opposite  New- 
York,  to  Philadelphia;  returns  from  Philadelphia  to 
Powles-Hook  in  two  Days  also;  they  will  endeavour  to 
oblige  the  Publick  by  keeping  the  best  of  Waggons  and 
sober  Drivers,  and  sets  out  from  Powle  Hook  and  Phila- 
delphia, on  Mondays  and  Thursdays,  punctually  at  Sun- 
rise, and  meets  at  Prince  Town  the  same  Nights,  to  ex- 
change Passengers,  and  each  return  the  Day  after  :  Those 
who  are  kind  enough  to  encourage  the  Undertaking,  are 
desired  to  cross  Pozvles  Hook  Ferry  the  Evenings  before, 
as  they  must  set  off  early :  The  Price  for  each  Passenger 
is  Ten  Shillings  to  Prince  Town,  and  from  thence  to  Phil- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  159 

adelphia,  Ten  Shillings  more,  Ferriage  free :  There  will 
be  but  two  Waggons,  but  four  sets  of  fresh  Horses,  so  it 
will  be  very  safe  for  any  Person  to  send  Goods,  as  there 
are  but  two  Drivers;  they  may  exchange  their  Goods 
without  any  Mistake.  Persons  may  now  go  from  New- 
York  to  Philadelphia,  and  back  again  in  five  Days,  and 
remain  in  Philadelphia  two  Nights  and  one  Day  to  do 
their  Business  in:  The  Public  may  be  assured  that  this 
Road  is  much  the  shortest,  than  any  other  to  Philadelphia, 
and  regular  Stages  will  be  kept  by  the  Publick's  obliged 
humble  Servants, 

JOHN  MERCEREAU,  and 
JOHN  BARNHILL. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1323,  May  9,  1768. 

The  Centinel,  No.  VIII. 

[signed  A.  B.  and  is  nearly  three  columns  long.]— The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1327,  May  12,  1768. 

BY  VIRTUE  of  several  Writs  to  me  directed,  on  the 
twenty  third  day  of  July  next,  will  be  exposed  to  sale,  on 
the  premises,  TWO  PLANTATIONS,  or  TRACTS  OF  LAND;  the 
one  containing  two  hundred  acres,  forty  of  which  are  good 
meadow,  within  bank,  and  sixty  acres  cleared  land,  within 
good  fence;  also  a  good  peach  and  apple  orchard,  a  good 
dwelling-house,  with  three  rooms  on  a  floor,  and  a  large 
frame  barn. 

The  other  about  one  hundred  and  thirty  acres  of  land, 
thirty  acres  of  which  is  good  meadow,  within  good  bank, 
and  a  good  peach  and  apple  orchard;  a  good  dwelling 
house,  with  two  rooms  on  a  floor,  both  situated  on  the 
west  side  of  Oldman's  Creek,  in  Penn's  Neck,  in  the 
county  aforesaid;  also  a  good  landing  on  each  plantation; 


l6o  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

late  the  property  of  George  Lawrence,  seized  and  taken 
in  execution  by 

Edward  Test,  Sheriff. 
Salem,  May  17,  1768. 

To  the  PUBLIC. 

THE  subscriber,  at  the  Royal  Oak  inn,  in  Trenton,  after 
returning  thanks  to  the  PUBLIC  in  general,  and  his  friends 
in  particular,  begs  leave  to  acquaint  them,  that  he  is  re- 
moved from  the  house  he  lately  lived  in,  to  the  brick  cor- 
ner house,  opposite  Samuel  Tucker's,  Esq;  formerly  kept 
by  Robert  Rutherford,  where  he  hopes  for  the  continuance 
of  their  favours,  to  their  very  humble  servant, 

RENSELAER  WILLIAMS. 

FORTY  SHILLINGS  REWARD. 

BORROWED  by  William  Godfrey,  and  his  wife,  of  the 
subscriber,  to  go  seven  or  eight  miles,  on  the  twenty-fifth 
of  April  last,  a  dark  roan  horse,  with  a  mealy  nose,  has 
several  saddle  spots,  and  a  lump  at  the  end  of  the  saddle 
next  the  crooper;  lops  his  ears  when  rode  slow,  goes 
heavy  in  his  pace;  when  put  on  his  courage,  is  spry,  trots 
smart  and  large,  one  of  his  hind  ancle  joints  is  thicker 
than  the  other,  but  does  not  hurt  his  travelling,  is  sure- 
footed, is  about  thirteen  hands  three  inches  high;  had 
no  shoes  on  when  taken  away,  had  a  switch  tail,  was  not 
trimmed,  but  may  be  altered,  branded  H  S,  and  another 
brand  under  the  other,  upside  down,  not  so  plain  as  the 
H  S  on  the  near  buttock,  is  nine  years  old;  also  had  with 
the  horse,  an  old  side-saddle,  with  a  blue  plush  seat,  and 
leather  skirts,  and  a  bridle  almost  new,  one  rein  chewed. 
— The  man  is  of  a  middle  stature,  thin  pale  face,  has  lost 
his  upper  teeth,  except  one,  winks  his  eyes  when  speaking, 
is  about  fifty  years  old,  brownish  hair,  had  on  a  new  pair 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  l6l 

of  boots,  and  a  new  pair  of  worsted  stockings;  otherwise 
poorly  dressed. — His  wife  is  short,  round  faced,  and  dou- 
ble chinned;  borrowed  at  the  same  time,  a  linsey  petti- 
coat with  yellow  and  other  stripes,  but  mostly  yellow,  the 
other  part  of  her  dress  cannot  be  particular iz'd;  she  is  a 
school-mistress,  and  handy  with  her  needle — For  securing 
the  horse,  and  giving  notice  to  the  owner,  living  in  Knoul- 
ton  township,  in  the  county  of  Sussex,  in  the  province  of 
New- Jersey,  so  that  the  subscriber  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  the  above  reward,  with  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by 

PHILIP  BELLUS. 

N.  B.  The  last  account  of  him  was  at  the  Great  Swamp, 
at  Tomkin's  tavern  in  Pennsylvania. 

BURLINGTON,  May  21. 

On  Thursday  last  was  married  in  this  City,  Mr.  WILL- 
IAM D.ILLWYN,  to  Miss  SALLY  SMITH,  Daughter  of  JOHN 
SMITH,  Esq;  a  young  Lady  possessed  of  every  Accom- 
plishment requisite  to  render  the  married  State  happy.1 

By  His  EXCELLENCY 
WILLIAM  FRANKLIN,  Esq; 

Captain  General,  Governor  and  Commander  in  Chief  in 
and  over  His  Majesty's  Province  of  New-Jersey,  and 
Territories  thereon  depending  in  America,  Chancellor 
and  Vice- Admiral  in  the  same,  &c. 

A   PROCLAMATION. 
WHEREAS   the   House  of   General   Assembly   of  this 

i  Sarah  Logan  Smith,  dau.  of  the  Hon.  John  Smith,  of  Franklin  Park, 
Burlington,  and  Hannah  Logan  (dau.  of  James  Logan,  of  Stenton, 
Chief  Justice  of  Pennsylvania),  was  b.  Aug.  29,  1749;  m.  William 
Dillwyn,  of  Philadelphia.  May  19,  1768;  d.  April  23,  1769.  He  removed 
to  Higham  Lodge,  Middlesex,  England.  Issue:  Susannah  Dillwyn,  b. 
March  3,  1769;  m.  Samuel  Emlen,  of  West  Hill,  April  16,  1795;  d.  s.  p. 
Nov.  24,  1819.  William  Dillwyn  was  a  brother  of  the  famous  Quaker- 
preacher  and  philosopher,  George  Dillwyn,  who  was  b.  in  Philadelphia. 
26th  of  2d  mo..  1738,  entered  the  ministry  in  his  28th  year,  traveled 
extensively  in  his  work,  spending  the  years  1784  to  1791  in  Europe,  and 
again.  1793  to  1802,  in  Great  Britain,  and  residing  in  Burlington,  N.  J., 
from  1802  until  his  death,  23d  of  6th  mo.,  1820. 

11 


It>2  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

Province  have,  by  Message,  requested  of  me  a  Dissolution, 
that  their  Constituents  may  have  an  Opportunity  of  a  new 
Election  of  Representatives :  I,  being  willing  and  de- 
sirous to  gratify  the  good  People  of  this  Province  in  every 
reasonable  Request,  DO  THEREFORE,  by  Virtue  of  the  Pow- 
er and  Authority  to  me  given  by  his  present  Majesty, 
under  the  Great  Seal  of  Great-Britain,  dissolve  this  pres- 
ent Assembly,  and  they  are  hereby  accordingly  dissolved, 
of  which  all  Persons  concerned  are  to  take  Notice,  and 
govern  themselves  accordingly. 

GIVEN  under  my  Hand  and  Seal  at  Arms,  in  Coun- 
cil, at  the  City  of  Burlington,  this  sixteenth  Day 
of  May,  in  the  eighth  Year  of  His  Majesty's 
Reign,  Anno.  Dom.  1768. 

WILLIAM  FRANKLIN. 
By  his  Excellency's  Command, 
Jos.  REED,  jun.  D.  Secretary. 
GOD  save  the  KING. 

[Writs  are  issued  for  a  new  Election  in  New- Jersey, 
returnable  the  twenty-fifth  of  June  next.'] 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  71,  May  16-23, 
1768. 

ALL  Persons  who  have  any  Demands  against  the  Es- 
tate of  Mr.  JOHN  STEARNDALL,1  of  Rockey-Hill,  deceased, 
are  desired  to  bring  in  their  Accounts  to  the  Subscriber, 
for  an  Adjustment;  and  all  those  who  are  indebted  to  said 
Estate,  are  desired  to  pay  the  same  without  further  delay, 
to  RICHARD  CURSON,  Administrator,  or  to  JACOB  BERGEN, 
Esq;  of  Rockey-hill. 

WAS  left  at  the  Powles-Hook  Ferry  House,  in  New- 


i  Mr.    Stearndall   operated   the    copper   mines   at   Second   River    (now 
Belleville)  and  Rocky  Hill,  near  New  Brunswick,  at  various  times. 


1768] 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 


York,  some  of  them  a  considerable  Time  ago,  2  Surtouts 
and  a  close  bodied  Coat.  Whoever  has  left  them,  by  ap- 
plying to  William  Sloe,  at  the  Ferry  House,  proving  their 
Property,  and  paying  the  Charges,  may  have  them  again. 

To  be  Let  for  a  YEAR,  or  the  SUMMER  SEASON. 

THE  House  and  Lot,  wherein  George  Ross,  Esq;  lately 
lived,  in  Elizabeth-Town,  remarkably  for  its  pleasant  Sit- 
uation. For  further  Particulars  enquire  of  Joseph  Wood- 
ruff, Jun.  Esq;  there,  or  Mr.  Kelly,  in  New  York. — The 
New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  863,  May 
1 6,  1768. 


Nezv-York,  May  16.  We  hear  from  Perth- Amboy, 
that  on  Tuesday  last  his  Excellency  the  Governor  of  New- 
Jersey,  gave  his  Assent  to  the  following  23  Acts  of  the 
General  Assembly  of  the  Province,  viz. 

An  Act  for  the  Support  of  Government. 

An  Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors. 

An  Act  to  erect  and  establish  Courts  in  the  several 
Counties,  for  the  Trial  of  small  Causes. 

An  Act  to  appoint  Commissioners  to  furnish  the  Bar- 
racks. 

An  Act  for  better  regulating  Constables,  Vendues,  and 
Taverns. 

An  Act  to  continue  an  Act  for  granting  a  Bounty  on 
Hemp,  Flax,  &c. 

An  Act  for  the  Trial  of  Slaves  for  Murder,  and  other 
Crimes,  &c. 

An  Act  for  the  Septennial  Election  of  Representatives, 
to  serve  in  General  Assembly,  in  the  Colony  of  New-Jer- 
sey. 

An  Act  for  chusing  Representatives  in  the  Counties  of 
Morris,  Cumberland,  and  Sussex. 


164  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

An  Act  to  regulate  the  Fishery  in  the  Eastern  Division, 
from  the  Mouth  of  Rariton,  Northward. 

An  Act  to  impower  the  Inhabitants  of  Bridgewater  and 
Bedminster,  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  to  repair  their 
Highways  by  Hire. 

An  Act  to  impower  the  Inhabitants  of  Pequanock  in 
Morris  County,  to  repair  their  Highways  by  Hire,  &c. 

An  Act  to  repair  public  Roads  in  South  Amboy  by 
Hire,  &c. 

An  Act  to  repair  and  amend  the  Roads  and  Streets  in 
the  North  Ward  of  Perth-Amboy,  £c. 

An  Act  to  build  a  Bridge  over  South-River,  &c. 

A  Supplementary  Act  to  an  Act,  to  regulate  the  Method 
of  taking  Fish  in  Delaware  River,  &c. 

An  Act  to  enable  Creditors  more  easily  to  recover  Debts 
from  joint  Partners. 

An  Act  appointing  Commissioners  to  sell  a  Quantity  of 
Gun-Powder  and  Lead,  &c.  belonging  to  the  Colony. 

An  Act  to  oblige  the  Assessors  to  deliver  Duplicates  of 
their  Assessments. 

An  Act  to  oblige  Town-Officers  to  hand  over  the  Laws 
to  their  Successors. 

An  Act  to  enable  the  Owners  and  Possessors  of  the 
Lower  Meadows  on  Woodbury  Creek,  to  dam  out  the 
Tide. 

And  to  two  Naturalization  Bills,  after  which  his  Excel- 
lency was  pleased  to  prorogue  the  General  Assembly  to 
the  3ist  Instant. — The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  No.  1324,  May  16,  1768. 

New-York,  May  19.  On  Wednesday  last,  the  Annual 
Convention  of  the  Episcopal  Ministers  of  this  Province, 
Connecticut  and  New-Jersey,  was  held  in  this  City.  A 
larger  Number  of  Ministers  were  present,  than  ever  as- 
sembled before  upon  the  like  Occasion. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  165 

RUN  away  May  the  I4th  1768,  from 
the  subscriber  in  Middletown,  a  Negro 

man  named  York,  about  five  feet  nine 
CUT 

inches  high,  18  years  of  age,  well  set, 

OF  has  one  of  his  fore  teeth  broke  near 

the  srum ;   had  on  when  he  went  away, 
RUNAWAY 

a  suit  of  homespun  mixt  grey  clothes, 

NEGRO    J       shoes  and  stockings,  brass  buckles,  and 
a  cock'd  felt  hat,  with  a  white  metal 
button.    Whoever  takes  up  said  Negro 
and  secures  him,  so  that  his  master  can  have  him,  shall 
have  twenty  shillings  reward,  and  all  charges,  paid  by 
me, 

CYRENIUS  VAN  MATER. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1324,  May  19,  1768. 

WHEREAS  DARBY  DURELL,  of  Lower  Penn's  Neck,  in 
the  county  of  Salem,  and  Province  of  New- Jersey,  did 
bargain  and  sell  unto  LEWIS  CATTS,  and  WILLIAM  GUEST, 
both  of  Upper  Penn's  Neck,  in  the  county  and  province 
aforesaid,  a  wood  boat,  of  the  burthen  of  10  cords  of  wood, 
which  said  Lewis  Catts  and  William  Guest,  did  give  their 
bond  to  said  Darby  Durell  for  £60,  lawful  money  of  the 
province  aforesaid,  being  the  sum  they  agreed  and  bar- 
gain'd  for  said  boat.  And  as  the  obligation  of  this  bond 
was  such,  that  the  said  Darby  Durell  was  to  give  to  the 
said  Lewis  Catts,  and  William  Guest,  a  proper  bill  of  sale 
for  said  boat,  and  to  indemnify  them,  the  said  Lewis  Catts, 
and  William  Guest,  from  any  claim  or  claims  that  any 
person  or  persons,  might  have  against  said  boat;  which 
obligation  was  never  executed  by  the  said  Darby  Durell, 
as  he  was  not  the  sole  owner  of  her,  nor  was  he  legally 
authorized  to  sell  said  boat;  therefore  this  is  to  give  pub- 


1 66  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

lie  notice,  that  should  the  said  Darby  Durell  attempt  to 
assign  over  to  any  person  or  persons  whatsoever,  our 
bond  for  said  boat,  that  we  will  never  consent  to  pay  the 
bond,  as  we  can  make  it  appear  that  it  was  illegally  entered 
into,  should  it  be  required;  as  witness  our  hands  this 
1 4th  of  May,  1768. 

WILLIAM  GUEST,  junior,  LEWIS  CATTS. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.   2056,   May    19, 
1768. 

The  Centinel,  No.  IX.1 

Just  published,  and  to  be  sold  by 
William  and  Thomas  Bradford, 

A  LETTER, 

CONCERNING  AN 

AMERICAN  BISHOP,  &c. 

To  Dr.  BRADBURY  CHANDLER,  Rector  of 

ST.  JOHN'S  CHURCH,  in  Elisabeth-Town, 

In  Answer  to  the 

APPENDIX 

Of  His  APPEAL  to  the  PUBLIC,  &c. 
The  APPEAL 

TO   THE 

PUBLIC  ANSWERED, 

In  behalf  of  the  NON-EPISCOPAL 

CHURCHES  in  AMERICA 

CONTAINING 

REMARKS  on  what  Dr.  THOMAS  BRADBURY  CHANDLER 

had  advanced,  on  the  four  following  Points, 
The  Original  and  Nature  of  the  EPISCOPAL  OFFICE. 

Reasons  for  sending  BISHOPS  to  AMERICA. 
The  PLAN  on  which  it  is  proposed  to  send  them. 

i  Two  columns. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  167 

And  the  OBJECTIONS  against  sending  them  obviated  and 

refuted. 
WHEREIN  THE 

REASONS  for  an  AMERICAN  EPISCOPATE  are  shewn  to  be 
insufficient,  and  the  OBJECTIONS  against  it  in  full  Force. 

By  CHARLES  CHAUNCY,  D.  D. 
And  Pastor  of  the  first  Church  of  Christ  in  Boston.1 


Aniwell,  province  of  West  New  Jersey,  May  16. 
WHEREAS  Ruth,  the  wife  of  John  Corwine,  hath  been 
eloped  from  him  ever  since  September  last,  and  doth  re- 
fuse to  return  to  her  husband,  and  be  in  her  duty  as  a 
lawful  wife,  but  hath  joined  with  other  men  against  him, 
to  the  great  damage  of  him  and  his  children,  and  hath  run 
him  considerably  in  debt :  And  further  to  inform  the  pub- 
lic that  notice  hath  been  given  in  December  last,  forwarn- 
ing  all  people  from  trusting  her  upon  his  account;  which 
advertisements  hath  been  privately  taken  down :  I  do 
hereby  forwarn  any  person  or  persons,  whatsoever,  of 
trusting  her  upon  my  account,  and  of  harbouring  any  of 
the  goods  which  she  hath  taken  with  her,  upon  their  peril ; 
therefore  I  shall  pay  no  debts  by  her  contracted  from  De- 
cember last;  nor  from  the  present  date  hereof. 

JOHN  CORWINE. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Act  of  General  Assembly  of  the  Prov- 
ince of  New- Jersey,  lately  published,  entituled,  "an  Act 
for  the  relief  of  insolvent  debtors,"  We  the  subscribers, 
being  now  confined  in  the  goal  of  the  County  of  Hunter- 
don,  and  we  have  petitioned  the  judges  of  the  inferior 
court  of  Common  Pleas  for  the  benefit  of  said  Act  and 
filed  a  schedule  of  effects,  do  give  notice  to  all  our  credi- 
tors to  appear  and  shew  cause,  if  any  they  have,  on  the 

1  See  p.  79,  ante,  note. 


1 68  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

ninth  day  of  June  next,  at  two  oclock  in  the  afternoon,  of 
the  same  day,  before  the  judges  of  the  said  court,  at  the 
dwelling  house  of  Charles  Axford,  Junior  in  Trenton,  why 
we  should  not  be  discharged  agreeable  to  the  directions  of 
the  said  act. 

Samuel  Hunt,  Ezekial  Anderson,  Josiah  Furman,  Jun. 
Ralph  Norton,  John  Throckmorton,  Samuel  Preston,  God- 
frey Peters,  Samuel  Smith,  Samuel  Stevenson,  James 
Cumberford,  John  Heming,  John  Edwards,  Nicholas 
Bowers,  Philip  M'Dermot,  Harmon  Waggoner,  Daniel 
Okerson,  Grover  Stout,  John  Stiers,  Jun.  John  Moore, 
Mathias  Sweesey;  George  Miller,  Samuel  Saterly,  Jacob 
Wildracke,  William  Coxe,  John  Lee,  Josiah  Furman, 
senr. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1328,  May  19, 
1768. 

A  Paragraph  from  a  Correspondent  at  Princeton. 
Stoney-Brook,  in  New-Jersey,  May  25,   1768. 

On  the  8th  Instant  departed  this  Life,  in  the  68th  Year 
of  his  Age,  JOHN  CLARK,  a  Man  of  an  amiable  Character, 

of  whom  it  may  be  truly  said,  that  he  was  a  loving 

Husband,  a  tender  Parent,  an  indulgent  Master,  and  an 
obliging  Neighbour;  which  makes  his  Death  greatly  la- 
mented. His  remains  were  decently  interred  in  the 
Quaker's  Burying-Ground  (of  which  Society  he  was  a 
Member)  at  this  Place,  on  the  Tuesday  following,  attend- 
ed by  a  large  Concourse  of  People. 

THREE  POUNDS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  New-Jersey, 
near  Princeton,  on  the  twentieth  of  this  Instant,  May,  a 
Dutch  servant  man,  named  Paulus  Abzicher,  alias  Peter 
Abzicher,  speaks  very  little  English,  aged  about  forty 
years,  six  feet  high  or  upwards;  he  is  a  well-set  lusty 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  169 

fellow,  of  a  stern  countenance,  has  a  large  nose,  and  of  a 
sandy  complexion,  a  very  large  beard;  had  on  when  he 
went  away,  a  felt  hat,  about  half  worn,  a  new  homespun 
drugget  coat,  of  a  snuff  colour,  with  white  metal  buttons, 
a  good  jacket,  without  sleeves,  of  a  greyish  colour,  with  a 
stripe  of  a  different  colour,  under  each  arm,  running  down- 
wards, without  pockets,  a  good  homespun  shirt,  old  sheep- 
skin breeches,  much  worn,  pale  blue  yarn  stockings,  and 
good  shoes,  with  strings  in  them.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  servant,  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  goals,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  the  above  re- 
ward, paid  by  me, 

ISAAC  CLARKE. 

THE  STURGEON  MANUFACTORY, 

Is  Now  carried  on  by  ELIJAH  BOND,  near  TRENTON, 
under  the  care  and  inspection  of  Mrs.  BROADFIELD,  whose 
knowledge  and  experience  in  that  branch  of  business  is 
well  known,  where  any  person  may  be  supplied,  either  for 
shipping  or  home  consumption,  at  FIFTEEN  SHILLINGS 
for  a  single  three-gallon  keg,  or  TWELVE  SHILLINGS  and 
Six  PENCE  by  the  quantity,  and  in  proportion  for  larger 
kegs: — Warranted  good. 

N.  B.  They  are  also  sold  at  COXE  and  FURMAN'S 
store,  in  WATER-STREET,  at  the  same  rates. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Chronicle,  No.  72,  May  23-30,  1768. 

New-York,  May  23.  We  hear  from  Newark,  That  last 
Friday  Morning  their  Town  Hall  was  near  being  con- 
sumed to  Ashes,  supposed  to  have  taken  Fire  by  a  live 
Cinder  dropping  upon  the  Roof  from  a  Chimney  in  one 
of  the  Apartments,  but  was  happily  extinguished  by  the 
Dexerity  of  the  Inhabitants  without  doing  any  other  Dam- 
age than  consuming  Part  of  the  Roof. 


1 70  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

Newark,  May  20,  1768. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Act  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the 
Province  of  New-Jersey,  lately  published,  entitled,  an 
"Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors,"  we  the  Sub- 
scribers being  now  confined  in  the  Gaol  of  Essex  County, 
and  having  petitioned  the  Judges  of  the  Inferior  Court  of 
Common  Pleas,  for  the  Benefit  of  said  Act,  and  filed  a 
Schedule  of  Effects,  do  give  Notice  to  all  our  Creditors 
to  appear,  and  shew  Cause,  if  any  they  have,  on  the  I4th 
of  June  next,  at  two  o' Clock  in  the  Afternoon  of  the  same 
Day,  before  the  Judges  of  the  said  Court,  at  the  Court- 
House  of  Essex  County  in  Newark,  why  we  should  not 
be  discharged,  agreeable  to  the  Direction  of  the  said  Act. 

SAMUEL  JYNNOR,  DAVID  BALL. 

NATHANIEL  WADE.  JONAS  BALL. 

ABRAHAM  SAYRE.  JOSEPH  BUDD. 

SAMUEL  STIVERS.  THOMAS  BRADBURY. 

Baskenridge,  Somerset  County,  May  16,  1768. 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward. 

Peter  Graham,  a  Person  who  was  apprehended,  and 
brought  before  Justice  Alwood  this  Day,  for  counterfeit- 
ing three  Notes,  one  against  John  Cooper,  for  Ten  Pounds, 
one  against  Hugh  Calwell  for  about  the  same  Sum,  the 
other  against  Thomas  Burgie  for  Eight  Pounds;  who 
upon  his  Examination  confessed  the  same,  but  refused  to 
give  them  up,  and  upon  his  Way  to  the  Goal,  made  his 
Escape  from  the  Constable:  The  said  Graham,  is  an 
Irishman,  about  5  Feet  10  Inches  high,  a  Weaver  by 
Trade,  .a  thick  set  Fellow,  talks  broad,  of  a  fair  Complex- 
ion, with  black  Hair;  had  on  when  he  made  his  Escape, 
a  light  coloured  Coat,  Jacket  and  Breeches;  whoever  takes 
up  the  said  Fellow,  and  secures  him  in  any  of  his  Majes- 
ty's Goals,  so  that  he  may  be  brought  to  Justice,  shall  have 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  171 

the  above  Reward  paid  by  the  Subscribers;  and  likewise 
we  do  forwarn  all  Persons  whatsoever  from  taking  said 
Notes,  as  we  shall  by  no  Means  pay  the  same,  or  any 
other  he  may  counterfeit  against  us. 

JOHN  COOPER, 
HUGH  CALWELL, 
THOMAS  BURGIE. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1325,  May  23,  1768. 

TEN  POUNDS  Reward 

THERE  are  missing  from  the  Owner,  four  Conveyances, 
viz.  one  from  Thomas  Atherton  to  Mark  Newby,  for  one 
Twentieth  of  a  Propriety  of  West  Jersey;  one  from 
James  Atkinson  to  Mordecai  Howell,  dated  5th  and  6th 
March,  1704;  one  from  said  Howell  to  Peter  Stretch, 
dated  26th  July,  1707;  one  from  said  Stretch  to  Abraham 
Porter,  dated  23d  and  24th  August  1709,  each  for  300 
Acres  of  Land  in  West  Jersey;  and  as  it  is  apprehended 
that  other  Interests  may  have  been  conveyed,  by  the  afore- 
said Conveyances,  or  some  of  them,  and  of  Consequence 
other  Titles  depend  thereon,  it  may  occasion  their  being 
in  the  Hands  of  the  Persons  who  now  have  them.  If  such 
Person,  or  any  other,  will  give  Information  of  the  above 
Deeds,  so  that  they  may  be  had  of  Record,  by  applying  to 
Peter  Thompson,  Conveyancer,  in  Philadelphia,  or  James 
Kinsey,  Esq;  in  Burlington,  they  shall  receive  the  above 
Reward. 

THREE  POUNDS  Reward. 

RUN  away  the  3d  of  May  inst.  from  the  Subscribers,  in 
Cumberland  County,  West  New  Jersey,  two  Negroe  Men, 
one  about  5  Feet  10  or  1 1  Inches  high,  named  PETER;  had 
with  him  two  Felt  Hats,  i  fine  Shirt,  i  Woollen,  and  2 
coarse  Ditto,  a  Thickset  Coat,  with  a  Cape,  a  black  Cut- 


172  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Velvet  Jacket,  blue  Plush  Breeches,  a  Pair  of  Leather 
Ditto,  2  Pair  of  Woollen  ribbed  Stockings,  i  Pair  of 
Thread  Ditto,  2  Pair  of  Shoes,  Brass  Buckles,  and  5  or 
6  Caps.  The  other  named  WILL,  is  a  stout  well  set  Fel- 
low, not  quite  so  tall  as  Peter;  had  with  him,  when  he 
went  away,  one  brown  Jacket,  i  old  Ditto,  without 
Sleeves,  blue  Breeches,  no  Hat.  As  they  are  artful  Fel- 
lows, it  is  not  unlikely  they  may  change  their  Cloaths  and 
Names,  the  latter  came  from  Carolina,  and  it  is  likely  they 
may  try  to  get  there  again ;  and  as  he  can  write,  and  they 
have  taken  Pen  and  Ink  with  them,  it  is  not  unlikely  they 
will  produce  a  Pass.  Whoever  secures  said  Negroes,  so 
as  their  Masters  may  have  them  again,  shall  have  the  above 
Reward,  or  Thirty  Shillings  for  either  of  them,  paid  by 

EPHRAIM  SEELY 
ISAAC  ANTRIN. 

NEW- YORK,  May  23 

We  hear  from  New- Ark  that,  on  Friday  last,  the  Court- 
House  of  that  Town,  by  an  Accident,  supposed  to  arise 
from  the  Chimney's  taking  Fire,  was  like  to  have  been 
reduced  to  Ashes;  but  by  the  extraordinary  Dexterity  of 
the  Inhabitants,  it  was  happily  prevented  from  doing  any 
other  Damage,  than  burning  Part  of  the  Roof. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Captain  Blewer  from  Quebec,  on  Monday  the  i6th  In- 
stant, spoke  the  Captains  Hardcastle  and  Chancellor,  and 
saw  Captain  Sparks,  who  had  all  left  our  Capes  that  Day. 

To  be  SOLD  by  the  SUBSCRIBER, 

By  way  of  public  vendue,  on  Monday,  the  I3th  of  June 
next,  if  not  sold  by  private  sale  before, 

A  VALUABLE  tract  of  land  in  Evesham l 

DAVID  OLIPHANT 

1  See  a  fuller  advertisement  in  No.  2014,  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  July  30, 
1767,  N.  J.  Archives,  XXV.,  420-422. 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1/3 

N.  B.     Great  bargains  to  be  had  here. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette,  No.  2057,  May  26,  1768. 

The  Centinel,  No.  X.1 

The  American  WHIG.  [No  VI. ] 
DOCTOR  Chandler's  Appeal,  begins  with  a  denial  of  the 
validity  of  the  ordination  of  all  the  protestant  ministers 
in  the  world,  except  those  of  his  own  denomination  .... 
— It  is  not  long  since  the  Rev.  Mons.  Haudin? 
took  the  pastoral  charge  of  the  episcopal  church  of  Tren- 
ton, in  New- Jersey,  and  afterwards  that  of  New-Rochelle. 
without  any  re  ordination;  but  before  Mr.  Munroe  could 
be  qualified  to  serve  the  chappel  of  Philipsburg,  he  was 
obliged  to  make  a  visit  to  the  bishop  of  London,  for  his 
hand  and  his  blessing — The  Pennsylvania  Jour- 
nal, ATo.  1329,  May  26,  1768. 

Alloways  Creek  Neck,  June  6,  1768. 
RUN  away  on  the  2Qth  of  May,  an  Irish  servant  man, 
who  speaks  good  English,  named  James  Herron :  Had 
on,  when  he  went  away,  a  blue  cloth  coat,  linsey  jacket, 
with  yellow  buttons,  tow  shirt,  and  black  neck-cloth,  tow 
trowsers,  and  an  old  beaver  hat,  no  stockings,  a  new  pair 
of  shoes,  with  brass  buckles,  has  black  hair,  stoops  when 
walking,  he  is  a  blacksmith  by  trade,  and  is  an  ill-looking 

1  Nearly  three  columns. 

2  The  Rev.  Michael  Houdin  was  born  in  France  in  1705.     He  was  edu- 
cated for  the  priesthood,  and  became  Superior  of  a  Franciscan  Convent 
at  Montreal.     Leaving  the  Church  of  Rome,  he  entered  the  Church  of 
England   in   New   York   in    1747.      In   June,    1750,    he  says,    "having  my 
residence  in  New  York,  I  heard  of  repeated  complaints  made  by  gentle- 
men and  principal  inhabitants   of  this  place   [Trenton],   Allen's   Town 
and  Borden's  Town,  it  being  for  many  years  destitute  of  a  Church  of 
England  minister;    and  without  any  sort  of  application  of  mine,    .... 
some   of   them   were   pleased   to  press   me   by   letter  to  come  amongst 
them."     This  led  to  the  organization  of  St.  Michael's  Church,  of  Tren- 
ton, in  1755 — the  name  being  probably  an  unintentional  compliment  to 
the   first  Rector.      In  1759   he  was   ordered  by  Lord  Loudon  to  accom- 
pany General  Wolfe  to  Quebec,  as  his  guide,  on  account  of  his  famil- 
iarity with  the  country,  and  he  was  retained  in  the  army  some  time. 
From  Canada  he  was  sent  as  missionary  to  New  Rochelle,  Westchester 
county,  N.  Y.,  where  he  died,  in  October,  1766. 


174  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

fellow.     Whoever  takes  up  said  servant,  shall  have  FOUR 
POUNDS  reward,  and  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

NICHOLAS  FARMER. 

Ten  Pounds  Reward. 

ABSCONDED  from  Woodberry,  in  the  county  of  Glou- 
cester, and  western  division  of  the  province  of  New-Jer- 
sey (the  usual  place  of  his  abode)  a  certain  Nathan  Col- 
lins, about  34  years  of  age,  and  about  five  feet  ten  inches 
high;  wore  his  own  black  strait  hair;  brown  eyed,  black 
eye-brows,  thin  faced,  fresh  coloured,  and  slender  built; 
very  talkative,  and  boasts  much  of  his  valour  when  a  pro- 
vincial soldier.  His  cloathing  cannot  be  particularly  de- 
scribed, as  he  took  several  sorts  with  him,  chiefly  pretty 
good.  It  is  supposed  he  had  a  considerable  sum  of  money 
with  him.  He  enticed  away  with  him,  an  apprentice  boy 
named  Joseph  Sharp,  about  five  feet  ten  inches  high,  18 
years  of  age,  wore  his  own  light  brown  hair,  down  look 
and  well  set.  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a  good  hat, 
ozenbrigs  shirt,  leather  breeches,  a  sailor's  knap'd  vest, 
blue  yarn  stockings,  and  a  pair  of  new  pumps. 

Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  Collins  and  Sharp, 
so  that  the  Subscriber  may  have  them  again,  shall  have 
Eight  Pounds  for  Collins,  and  Forty  Shillings  for  Sharp, 
paid  by 

WILLIAM  DOWNS. 

WHEREAS  the  General  Assembly  of  the  province  of 
New- Jersey,  hath  lately  passed  an  Act  for  the  relief  of 
Insolvent  Debtors;  and  in  pursuance  thereof,  Alexander 
Ferguson,  Thomas  Go  forth,  Henry  Quigg,  John  Small, 
John  Nichol,  Benjamin  Chambers,  and  Joshua  Kindall 
(prisoners  for  debt  in  the  goal  of  the  county  of  Burling- 
ton) have  petitioned  the  judges  of  said  court,  for  relief 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  175 

in  that  case.  The  creditors  of  said  petitioners  are  there- 
fore desired  to  meet  at  the  court-house  in  Burlington,  on 
the  2Oth  day  of  6th  month,  called  June,  at  10  of  the  clock, 
to  chuse  such  persons  as  they  shall  think  fit,  to  whom  the 
said  debtors  may  assign  their  estate  for  the  use  of  their 
creditors :  Or  otherwise  to  shew  cause,  if  any  there  be, 
why  the  said  debtors,  or  either  of  them,  ought  not  to  be 
relieved  from  their  confinement. 

Burlington.  ROBERT  SMITH, 

May  31,  1768.  HENRY  PAXSON. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  73,  May  ^o-June 
6,  1768. 

RuN-away  from  the  subscriber,  about  the  first  of  Sep- 
tember last,  living  in  Somerset  county,  near  Pluckhimin,1 
an  indented  Irish  servant  man,  named  Matthew  King, 
(about  two  years  in  this  country)  he  is  about  17  years  of 
age,  5  feet  9  inches  high,  with  short  hair,  and  speaks  very 
much  on  the  Irish  accent  (or  brogue.)  Had  on  when  he 
went  away,  a  tow  shirt  and  trowsers,  a  light  colour'd  lin- 
sey  jacket,  and  an  old  castor  hat.  Whoever  takes  up  the 
said  run-away,  and  secures  him  so  that  his  master  may 
have  him  again,  shall  receive  two  dollars  reward,  and  all 
reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

MARCUS  KING. 

— The  N.  Y.  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  865, 
May  30,  1768. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Act  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the 
Province  of  New-Jersey,  lately  published,  entitled,  "An 
Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors,  we  the  Subscribers 
being  now  confined  in  the  Gaol  of  the  County  of  Essex, 
and  having  petitioned  to  the  Judges  of  the  Inferior  Court 

1  A  popular  interpretation  of  the  meaning  of  the  name  Pluckemin — 
which  is  from  twa  Indian  words,  pulig  and  min,  meaning  fine  berries, 
or  fruit. 


176  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

of  Common  Pleas,  for  the  Benefit  of  the  said  Act,  filed  a 
Schedule  of  Effects,  do  give  Notice  to  all  our  Creditors 
to  appear  on  the  3Oth  Day  of  June  next,  at  two  o' Clock  in 
the  Afternoon,  of  the  same  Day,  before  the  Judges  of  the 
said  Court,  at  the  Court-House  of  the  County  of  Essex, 
in  Elizabeth-Town,  and  shew  Cause,  if  any  they  have,  why 
we  should  not  be  discharged  agreeable  to  the  Directions  of 
the  said  Act. 

JAMES  BALEY 
May  28,  1768.  SAMUEL  YEOMANS. 

BY  Order  of  Stephen  Skinner,  Rune  Runyon,  and  Jon- 
athan Frazee,  Esqrs;  Judges  of  the  Inferior  Court  of  Com- 
mon Pleas,  for  the  County  of  Middlesex,  in  the  Province 
of  New- Jersey:  Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  Creditor  or 
Creditors  respectively  of  John  Le  Conte,  Jacob  Skillman, 
jun.  William  Currey,  James  Mooney,  Nicholas  Fhy,  Will- 
iam Robins,  Hugh  Dunn,  and  Josia-h  Dams,  insolvent 
Debtors,  in  the  Gaol  of  the  said  County  of  Middlesex,  to 
shew  Cause,  if  any  they  have,  before  the  said  Judges,  at 
the  House  of  Elijah  Dunham,  Innholder,  in  the  City  ot 
Perth- Amboy,  in  the  County  of  Middlesex  aforesaid,  or; 
Wednesday  the  I5th  Day  of  June  next,  at  ten  o' Clock  in 
the  Forenoon,  why  an  Assignment  of  the  said  Debtors 
Estates,  respectively,  should  not  be  made,  and  the  said 
Debtors  discharged,  pursuant  to  the  Directions  of  a  late 
Act  of  the  Governor,  Council,  and  General  Assembly  of 
this  Province,  entitled,  "An  Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insol- 
vent Debtors. 

Perth- Amboy,  May  27,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1326,  May  30,  1768. 

New-York,  May  30.  We  hear  from  Hackinsack  that 
the  following  melancholy  Accident  happen'd  there  on 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  177 

Sunday  last,  just  after  Sunset,  viz.  A  fine  little  Boy,  who 
went  to  School  there,  about  8  Years  of  Age,  (Son  of  Wm. 
Livingston,  Esq;  of  this  City)1  proposed  to  one  of  his 
Companions  to  take  a  Sail,  (as  he  called  it)  that  is  to  go 
in  a  Canoe  on  the  little  River  at  that  Place.  They  went 
off  together,  but  the  other  Boy  changing  his  mind  and 
coming  back,  little  Livingston  went  alone.  He  had  been 
gone  about  half  an  Hour  when  he  was  missed  and  enquired 
for.  On  going  to  the  Landing,  his  Hat  Was  found  on  the 
Shore,  and  at  a  little  Distance  his  Body  quite  Dead  lying 
in  the  Water,  which  was  but  about  2  Feet  deep.  The 
Canoe  was  not  put  off,  but  it  is  imagined  by  some  Acci- 
dent he  fell  into  the  Water,  and  thro'  Surprise  was  dis- 
abled from  helping  himself. — The  New  York  Journal  or 
General  Advertiser,  No.  1326,  June  2,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  June  2 

Monday  last  Lieutenant  PERKINS,  of  the  Royal  Irish 
Regiment,  coming  from  Burlington  in  the  Stage-Boat, 
unfortunately  fell  overboard,  and  was  drowned,  before 
any  Assistance  could  be  given  him. 

WHEREAS  a  report  is  industriously  circulated,  that  I 
John  Wolf  Litzel,  Minister  of  Philipsburgh,3  in  West  New- 
Jersey,  have  married  together  a  certain  Lydia  Pursley  to 
Lyon  Jones  of  Philipsburgh,  merchant;  this  is  to  declare 
the  said  report  to  be  injurious,  false  and  groundless,  at 
witness  my  hand, 

M.  JOHN  WOLF  LITZEL. 

— The  Pennsylvania   Gazette,   No.    2058,   June   2, 
1768. 

1  Philip    French    Livingston    was   b.    Sept.    1,    1760,    and   bap.    Sept.    4, 
1760,  in  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  of  New  York. 

2  A  survey  was  made,   May  27,   1762,   of  a  plot  of  one  acre,   whereon 
was  already  a  Lutheran  church  and  burying-  ground,  which  plot  William 
Coxe  proposed  to  convey  to  trustees  for  the  use  of  the  church.     See 
Hist.   Sussex  and  Warren  Counties,   p.   556. 

18 


178  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

The  CENTINEL,  No.  XL 

IT  was  remarked  in  a  former  Paper,  that  if  the  Juris- 
diction of  Parliament  to  interfere  in  the  internal  Police 
of  the  Colonies,  was  ever  so  well  established,  yet  it  would 
be  extremely  dangerous  for  us  to  have  so  very  delicate  a 
Part  of  it  as  Church-Polity;  regulated  by  that  respectable 
Body;  .... 

Yea,  such  a  favourite  is  the  American  Admiralty,  that 
the  British  Legislature,  on  assuming  a  Power  to  tax  the 
Colonies,  has  given  much  of  the  Business  of  the  Court  of 
Exchequer,  which  is  a  Court  of  common  Law,  to  this 
arbitrary  Tribunal.  ||  And  not  content  with  bringing  it 
ashore  at  our  Sea-Ports,  and  enabling  it  to  scourge  our 
Merchants,  they  have  sent  it  up  into  our  Forrests,  and 
directed  that  the  Penalties  imposed  on  such  Persons  as 
shall  destroy  his  Majesties  Pine-Trees  in  New-England, 
New- York,  and  New- Jersey,  shall  be  recoverable  in  the 
Admiralty 

\\See  Stamp- Act,  &c. 

On  Monday  afternoon  last,  as  the  Burlington  stage- 
boat  was  coming  down  the  river,  a  young  lady's  hat  blew 
overboard,  which,  Lieut.  Perkins,1  of  the  i8th  Regt.  en- 
deavouring to  recover,  by  getting  into  a  small  boat,  fell 
in  the  river  and  was  drowned.  His  body  has  not  yet 
been  found. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1330,  June 
2,  1768. 

Philadelphia,  June  3,  1768. 

DANIEL  GOODMAN,  living  in  Arch  street,  in  the  city  of 
Philadelphia,  Baker,  (being  a  Seventh  Son)  hereby  gives 
notice,  that  for  a  number  of  years  past,  in  England,  New- 
Jersey  and  Pennsylvania,  he  hath  cured  divers  persons 

i  William  Perkins  was  commissioned  Lieutenant  of  the  18th  or  Royal 
Irish  Regiment  of  Foot,  January  1,  1766.  The  regiment  served  in  Amer- 
ica. 1768-1773. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  179 

afflicted  with  the  KING'S  EVIL,  by  using  no  other  means  or 
remedies  than  by  stroking  the  part  affected,  with  his  hand ; 
therefore  any  person  or  persons  affected  with  the  disorder, 
by  applying  to  him,  may  be  relieved  in  like  manner.  And 
as  he  doth  the  same  from  a  principle  of  humanity,  and 
not  with  any  lucrative  views,  any  person  or  persons  will 
be  cured  without  fee  or  reward. — The  Pennsylvania 
Chronicle,  No.  74,  June  6-13,  1768. 

Neiv-York,  June  6.  Yesterday  a  Sloop  came  up  from 
Great-Egg-Harbour,  the  Master  of  which  says,  That  last 
Saturday  Morning  he  saw  a  Ship  ashore  at  Little-Egg- 
Harbour,  with  all  her  Sails  loose. 

Beaver-Pond,  May  28,  1768.  Last  Monday  a  Thou- 
sand People  were  drawn  to  this  Place,  by  an  Advertise- 
ment for  a  Twenty  Pounds  Plate.  Three  Horses,  &c. 
were  to  start,  or  no  Race;  only  Capt.  Anthony  Rutgen's 
Queen  Kate,  got  by  Ariel,  and  Mr.  Hird's1  Lady  Leggs, 
got  by  Briton,  appeared.  The  Owners,  to  divert  a  very 
respectable  Company,  as  there  was  not  a  sufficient  Num- 
ber to  run  for  the  Plate,  agreed  upon  a  Sweepstakes,  but 
the  Jersey  Sportsman  refused  to  gratify  the  Spectators 
with  a  Contest,  pretending  that  the  Sum  was  too  trifling 
to  hazard  a  Heat  upon,  so  that  after  paying  Forfeit,  he 
left  the  Field,  and  the  Superiority  of  the  two  Racers  un- 
decided :  Should  he  be  valiant  enough  to  face  this  Blood 
of  Ariel,  a  Plate  in  the  Fall,  whether  in  Pennsylvania,  or 
at  Home,  may  assure  him  that  a  Briton  Filly  is  as  super- 
able  in  our  Northern  Colonies,  as  at  the  Plains  of  UPPER 
MARLBOROUGH. 

To  be  sold,  at  Morris  Town,  in  the  county  of  Morris, 
near  the  Court-House,  a  commodious  and  well  situated 

i  Nathaniel  Heard. 


ISO  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [  1 768 

new  house,  two  stories  high,  wherein  Augustine  Moore, 
Esq;  deceased  lately  lived;  with  about  three  acres  of  land, 
on  which  it  stands,  planted  with  a  fine  young  growing 
orchard,  grafted  with  the  choicest  fruits,  with  a  good  barn 
and  stable  on  the  same.  Likewise  a  lot  of  about  ten  acres, 
of  pasture  and  wood  land,  will  be  sold  separate  or  to- 
gether, as  shall  best  suit  the  purchaser;  the  terms  of  pay- 
ment will  be  made  easy,  as  the  money  is  not  wanted.  For 
particulars,  enquire  of  Mary  Moore,  on  the  premises. 

To  be  sold  at  private  sale,  a  lot  of  land  in  Perth  Amboy, 
belonging  to  the  estate  of  Alexander  Thompson,  deceased, 
being  fifty  feet  in  front,  arfd  running  from  Bank  Street  to 
low  water  mark.  There  is  on  said  lot  a  good  dwelling- 
house,  barn,  and  other  out-houses,  with  a  wharf  boarded 
in,  and  all  in  good  repair.  Any  person  inclining  to  be- 
come a  purchaser,  by  applying  to  the  subscriber,  living  in 
said  house,  may  know  the  terms  and  conditions  of  sale. 

BARSHABA  THOMPSON,  Executrix. 

RuN-away  from  the  subscriber,  on  the  i8th  ult.  a  Negro 
named  Brunce,  'tis  likely  he  will  change  his  name  to  Tom, 
(as  he  has  told  some  persons,  already  that  was  his  name)  : 
He  is  about  30  years  of  age,  5  feet  2  or  3  inches  high,  is 
very  nimble  in  walking,  and  talks  broken  English  and  low 
Dutch :  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  felt  hat,  a 
grayish  colour'd  jacket,  and  old  shoes  and  stockings. 
Whoever  takes  up  said  Negro,  and  secures  him,  in  any  of 
his  Majesty's  goals  on  the  continent,  so  that  he  may  be 
had  again,  or  brings  him  to  the  subscriber  living  in  the 
township  of  Reading,  Hunterdon  county,  East-Jersey, 
shall  have  FORTY  SHILLINGS  reward,  and  all  reasonable 
charges  paid  by 

CHARLES  EVERSOLE 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  l8l 

Somerset  County.  )  IN  pursuance  of  an  order  made 

New- Jersey,  )  "  by  Philip  Van  Home,  and  Bry- 
an Lefferty,  Esqrs,  two  of  the  judges  of  the  inferior  court 
of  common  pleas,  in  and  for  the  county  of  Somerset,  in 
East  New- Jersey,  upon  the  petition  of  Annanias  Randall. 
Matthew  Gracey,  Frederick  Teel,  Christopher  Hay  den, 
Nathaniel  Hayden,  Peter  Van  Tilburgh,  and  John  Fan- 
sey,  insolvent  debtors,  now  in  actual  goal  in  the  said 
county;  notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  said  petitioners,  to 
all  the  creditors  of  the  said  petitioners,  to  shew  cause,  if 
any  they  have,  before  the  said  judges,  at  Millstone,  in  the 
county  of  Somerset  aforesaid,  on  Wednesday  the  2Qth 
day  of  June  inst.  at  10  o'clock  in  the  forenoon  of  said  day, 
being  the  time  and  place  appointed  by  the  said  judges, 
why  an  assignment  of  said  petitioners  estates,  should  not 
be  made  to  persons  then  and  there  to  be  appointed  by  the 
said  judges,  and  the  said  petitioners  be  thereupon  dis- 
charged, according  to  an  act  of  the  governor,  council,  and 
general  assembly,  of  the  province  aforesaid,  made  and 
passed  at  Perth- Amboy,  in  the  8th  year  of  his  present  Maj- 
esty's reign,  entitled,  "an  act  for  the  relief  of  insolvent 
debtors." 

Dated  June  2,  1768. 

—The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
866,  June  6,  1768. 

Bergen,  June  2,  1768. 

Pursuant  to  the  Directions  of  a  Vote  of  the  General 
Assembly  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  Notice  is  here- 
by given,  by  the  Proprietors  or  Claimers  of  the  Common 
Lands  allotted  to  the  Patent  of  Secaucus,  in  the  County  of 
Bergen,  that  they  purpose  to  make  Application  to  the  Gen- 
eral Assembly  of  the  said  Province,  at  their  next  Session, 
for  a  Law  to  appoint  Commissioners,  to  make  Partition 


1 82  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

of  said  Common  Lands  of  which  all  concerned  may  take 
Notice,  and  if  they  have  any  Objections,  they  may  then 
make  them  appear  to  the  General  Assembly,  according  to 
the  usage  in  such  Cases. 

Piscataway,  June  i,  1768. 
To  be  SOLD,  or  leased,  for  a  Term  of  Years, 

by  the  Subscriber, 

A  Grist-Mill,  in  good  order,  with  about  50  or  60  Acres 
of  Land.  There  is  on  the  Premises  a  Dwelling-House, 
near  the  Mill,  which  stands  within  100  Yards  of  said  Mill; 
the  Constructions  of  the  Mill  are  as  well  calculated,  per- 
haps, as  any  in  the  Country;  it  is  double-geer'd  with  a 
Water  Wheeel  of  20  Feet  diameter,  and  a  sufficient  Fall 
of  Water.  The  Head  and  Fall  of  the  Mill  is  from  the 
Surface  of  the  Pond  to  the  Bottom  of  the  Wheel  37  Feet; 
the  grinding  Water  that  stands  in  the  Forbay  is  13  Feet; 
the  Pond  long  and  deep,  and  holds  so  much  Water,  the 
Mill  has  not  wanted  in  the  dryest  Seasons ;  the  dam  being 
rais'd  to  the  Height  it  now  is.  The  Mill  stands  within  150 
Yards  of  the  River  Rariton,  and  within  250  Yards  of  as 
public  a  Landing  as,  perhaps,  any  one  in  the  Country. 
The  Whole  is  most  beautifully  situated,  and  in  a  delight- 
ful Place;  with  a  large  Country  back  of  it;  and  is,  at  this 
Time,  a  well  calculated  Place  for  a  Shopkeeper.  The 
Vendue  will  be  held,  and  Conditions  of  Sale  made  known, 
the  2Oth  Day  of  this  Instant;  and  a  good  and  sufficient 
Title  will  be  given  by  JOHN  MARTIN,  who  lives  near  the 
Premises. 

N.  B.  The  same  Day  will  be  sold,  a  Lot  of  Salt  Mead- 
ow, of  about  six  Acres,  and  a  Lot  of  about  ten  Acres  of 
Fresh  Meadow;  with  sundry  other  Things,  by  said  John 
Martin. — The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy, 
No.  1327,  June  6,  1768. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  183 

Morris  County  \  IN  pursuance  of  an  order  made  by 
New- Jersey,  )  Jacob  Foord,  and  Robert  Goble, 
esqrs.  two  of  the  judges  of  the  inferior  court  of  common 
pleas,  in  and  for  the  said  county  of  Morris  and  province 
of  East  New-Jersey;  upon  the  petition  of  Daniel  Tuttle, 
Henry  Dow  Tripp,  Silas  Hinds,  and  Jeremiah  Cramer, 
insolvent  debtors,  now  in  Actual  goal,  in  said  county: 
Notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  said  petitioners,  to  all  the 
creditors  of  the  said  petitioners,  to  shew  cause  (if  any  they 
have)  before  the  said  judges,  at  the  court-house  in  Morris- 
town,  in  the  county  of  Morris  aforesaid,  on  Friday  the 
first  day  of  July  next,  at  two  of  the  clock  of  said  day, 
being  the  time  and  place  appointed  by  the  said  judges, 
why  an  assignment  of  the  said  petitioner's  estates  should 
not  be  made  to  persons  then  and  there  to  be  appointed  by 
the  creditors  or  said  judges;  and  the  said  petitioners  be 
thereupon  discharged,  according  to  an  act  of  the  gover- 
nor, council,  and  general  assembly  of  the  province  afore- 
said, made  and  passed  at  Perth-Amboy,  in  the  eighth  year 
of  the  reign  of  his  present  majesty  George  the  third,  en- 
titled, "An  act  for  the  relief  of  insolvent  debtors." 
Morris-Town,  June  8,  1768. 


Monmouth.  )  BY  Order  of  the  Honourable  John  An- 
Nezv-Jersey,  )  derson,  and  James  Lawrence,  Esqrs. 
two  of  the  Judges  of  the  Inferior  Court  of  Common  Pleas 
for  said  County :  Whereas  John  Emley,  Jonathan  Hunt, 
Abiel  Akin,  Andrew  Wilson,  David  Stout,  Peter  Van 
Kerk,  Thomas  Jacobs,  John  Williams,  Nicolas  Philips, 
Samuel  Romine,  John  Hampton,  William  Voorhees,  Rob- 
ert Morris,  John  Morris,  Samuel  Morril,  William  Sears, 
John  Crowshorn,  John  Guibeson,  Richard  Morris,  James 
Ker,  John  Foster,  John  Rouce,  William  Van  Kerk,  jun. 
and  Robert  Stout;  Prisoners  for  Debt  in  the  Gaol  of  said 
County,  did  on  the  third  Day  of  June,  1768,  make  Appli- 


1 84  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

•cation  to  said  Judges,  for  the  Benefit  of  the  late  Insolvent 
Act,  entitled  an  Act  for  the  Benefit  of  insolvent  Debtors, 
made  in  the  Eighth  Year  of  his  present  Majesty's  Reign 
for  said  Purpose,  having  qualified  and  filed  their  Sched- 
ules. 

Now  these  are  to  give  Notice  to  the  Creditors  of  the 
said  Debtors,  that  they  be  together  at  said  Goal  aforesaid, 
on  Monday  the  27th  Day  of  this  Instant  June,  at  10 
o'Clock,  (to  shew  Cause  if  any  they  have)  why  the  said 
Prisoners  Estates  should  not  be  assigned  and  their  Bodies 
discharged  from  their  Confinement,  pursuant  to  said  Act. 
— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1327,  June  9,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  June  9 

The  Ship  Sally,  Captain  Rankin,  in  7  Weeks  from 
Newry,  for  this  Port,  is  ashore  off  Little  Egg  Harbour. ' 

On  Sunday  Night,  the  22d  of  last  Month,  a  Fire  broke 
out  in  the  House  of  Mr.  Richard  Dickinson,  Watchmaker, 
in  Mount-holly,  which  entirely  consumed  the  same,  to- 
gether with  all  the  Furniture,  and  every  Thing  therein, 
to  a  considerable  Amount.  The  Fire  had  got  to  such  a 
Head  before  it  was  discovered,  that  Mr.  Dickinson,  the 
only  Person  in  the  House,  narrowly  escaped  with  his  Life. 

Gloucester  County,  June  6,  1768. 
FOUR  DOLLARS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber,  on  the  4th  instant,  a 
Negroe  man,  named  JACOB,  about  24  years  of  age,  5  feet 
7  or  8  inches  high,  has  sharp  filed  teeth,  is  apt  to  stutter 
if  he  talks  fast;  had  on,  and  took  away  with  him,  a  brown 
bearskin  jacket,  a  short  brown  kersey  under  ditto,  with 
sleeves,  one  check  shirt  and  trowsers,  and  one  tow  shirt 
and  trowsers.  half  worn  shoes,  a  spotted  red  silk  handker- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 8$ 

chief,  and  half  worn  felt  hat.  Whoever  takes  up  and  se- 
cures said  Negroe,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again, 
shall  have  the  above  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by  WILLIAM  COOPER. 

N.  B.  All  persons  are  forbid  to  harbour  or  conceal  said 
Negroe,  as  they  may  depend  on  being  prosecuted  as  the 
law  directs. 

The  Body  of  Lieutenant  Perkins,  who  was  drowned, 
as  mentioned  in  our  last,  has  since  been  taken  up,  and  was 
decently  buried  on  Sunday  last,  in  New- Jersey,  about  six 
miles  up  the  river. 

On  Thursday  the  26th  of  May,  the  reverend  Mr.  Beach1 
of  New-Brunswick  was  married  to  the  amiable  and  ac- 
complished Miss  Nancy  Van  Winkle,  a  lady  whose  shin- 
ing virtues  and  sweet  disposition  must  render  the  marriage 
state  truly  happy. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Cumberland 
county,  West  New-Jersey,  the  3d  of  May  last,  a  Negro 
man,  named  Peter,  but  has  since  changed  his  name  to  that 
of  JACK  SHARP,  he  is  about  5  feet  10  inches,  30  years  of 
age,  has  a  large  scar  on  one  of  his  arms  cut  with  a  sickle : 
had  on  and  took  with  him,  two  felt  hatts,  one  woolen,  one 
fine  and  two  coarse  linen  shirts,  a  thick-set  coat  with  a 
cape,  a  black  cut  velvet  jacket,  a  pair  of  blue  plush  and  a 
pair  of  leather  breeches,  and  five  or  six  caps..  He  has  since 

iThe  Rev.  Abraham  Beach  was  b.  in  Cheshire,  Conn.,  in  1740,  and 
graduated  at  Yale  in  1757.  He  went  to  England  in  1767  for  ordination, 
and  was  appointed  missionary  at  New  Brunswick  and  Piscataqua,  N.  J., 
arriving  there  the  latter  part  of  September  in  that  year.  In  July,  1776, 
declining  to  omit  the  prayers  for  the  King  and  the  royal  family,  he 
was  obliged  to  close  the  churches,  but  continued  during  the  war  to 
"dispense  spiritual  consolation  alike  to  Whigs  and  Tories."  In  1783  he 
was  appointed  temporary  missionary  at  Perth  Amboy.  In  1784  he  re- 
moved to  New  York,  having  been  appointed  assistant  minister  of  Trin- 
ity church  in  that  city.  In  1813  he  resigned,  on  a  pension  of  $1,500  for 
life,  voted  him  by  the  church.  He  retired  to  a  farm  on  the  Raritan, 
where  he  d.  in  1828.  His  wife,  Ann,  was  the  daughter  and  sole  heiress 
of  Evart  Van  Winkle,  one  of  the  early  Dutch  settlers  on  the  Raritan; 
she  d.  in  1808. 


1 86  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

changed  his  apparel  and  forged  a  pass,  signed  Ephraim 
Seeley. 

Whoever  takes  up  said  Negro,  and  secures  him  in  any 
of  his  Majesty's  Goals,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him 
again,  or  brings  him  home,  shall  have  THREE  POUNDS 
reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

EPHRAIM  SEELY. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1331,  June  9,  1768. 

New-York,  June  13.  The  Ship  mentioned  in  our  last 
to  be  ashore  at  Little-Egg-Harbour,  proves  to  be  the  Sally, 
Capt.  Rankin,  from  Newry,  bound  for  Philadelphia. 

Middlesex  County  )  WHEREAS  by  virtue  of  several 

New-Jersey,       5  writs  of  fieri  facias,  to  me  di- 

rected, issued  out  of  the  supreme  court  of  this  province, 
and  county  court  of  Middlesex  aforesaid,  against  the 
goods  and  chattels,  lands  and  tenements  of  Whitehead 
Leonard,  at  the  suit  of  Stephen  Jones,  and  others,  I  have 
seized  and  taken  about  ten  acres  of  land,  with  a  fulling 
mill  thereon,  of  and  belonging  to  the  said  Leonard,  situ- 
ate in  South  Brunswick,  in  the  county  aforesaid,  near 
Kingstown;  the  said  mill  hath  the  advantage  of  a  good 
stream  of  water,  and  a  well  settled  neighbourhood.  Now 
these  are  to  give  notice,  that  the  lands  and  mill,  taken  as 
aforesaid,  will  be  exposed  to  sale,  at  public  vendue,  on 
Friday  the  2Qth  of  July  next,  at  the  house  of  Willliam 
Van  Tilbury,  innholder,  in  Kingstown  aforesaid ;  the  sale 
to  begin  at  12  o'clock  of  said  day,  at  which  time  and  place 
the  conditions  will  be  made  known  by 

JOHN  MOORES,  Sheriff. 
Perth- Amboy,  May  28,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No 
867,  June  13,  1768. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 87 

Woodbridge,  June  9,  1768. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  the  2Qth  ult.  a  Negroe 
Man,  named  Cuff,  about  5  Feet  10  Inches  high,  full  faced, 
and  thick  set ;  has  a  large  Scar  on  his  right  great  Toe,  cut 
within;  had  on  when  he  went  away,  a  Woolen  Shirt,  a 
Pair  of  Leather  Breeches,  a  Grey  Kersey  Jacket,  and  Felt 
Hat,  but  may  probably  change  his  Dress.  Whoever  takes 
up  said  Negroe  Man,  and  secures  him,  so  that  his  Master 
may  have  him  again,  shall  have  THREE  DOLLARS  Reward, 
paid  by  the  Subscriber. 

JONATHAN   CLAWSON. 

Maidenhead,  Hunterdon  County,  June  4,  1768. 

TEN  POUNDS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  on  Tuesday  the  3ist 
of  May,  an  Irish  Servant  Man,  named  John  Burns,  but  it's 
likely  will  change  his  Name,  about  25  Years  old,  5  Feet  8 
Inches  high,  of  a  fresh  Complexion,  a  little  freckled,  black 
Hair,  but  will  probably  cut  it  off,  brown  Eyes;  had  on, 
and  took  with  him,  a  grey  napt  Coat,  Metal  Buttons,  green 
napt  Vest,  new  Felt  Hat,  Half-worn  Buckskin  Breeches, 
blue  Yarn  Stockings,  Brass  Buckles,  a  fine  Linen  and  an 
Oznabrigs  Shirt,  with  sundry  other  Articles.  He  is  a 
Cooper  by  Trade;  and  it's  thought  will  make  for  the  Mo- 
hawk River.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Servant,  and  deliv- 
ers him  to  his  Master,  or  secures  him  in  any  Goal,  so  that 
he  may  be  had  again,  shall  have  the  above  Reward,  and 
reasonable  Charges. 

WILSON  HUNT. 

A  new  and  accurate  MAP  of  the  Province  of  PENNSYL- 
VANIA, VIRGINIA,  MARYLAND,  NEW-JERSEY,  and  part 
of  NEW- YORK,  &c.  humbly  dedicated  to  their  Honours 
the  Governors  of  the  several  Provinces. 


1 88  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

THIS  map  begins  in  the  Atlantic  ocean,  in  latitude  36 
degrees  north,  and  at  a  meridian  of  74  degrees  west  from 
London,  thence  continues  by  the  same  parallel  of  36  de- 
grees north  latitude,  to  the  longitude  of  89  degrees  west 
of  London,  'which  makes  the  west  longitude  in  the  map 
1 5  degrees,  equal  to  about  700  miles,  allowing  a  little  bet- 
ter than  46  miles  to  each  degree  of  longitude  in  this  lati- 
tude, which  will  determine  about  36  miles  west  of  the 
river  Mississippi,  and  the  line  of  36  degrees  north  lati- 
tude, will  pass  about  60  miles  south  of  the  confluence  of 
the  rivers  Mississippi  and  the  Ohio,  thence  from  the  8Qth 
degree  of  west  longitude,  northward  to  the  46th  degree 
of  north  latitude,  which  will  be  about  160  miles  west  of 
the  westermost  point  of  the  Noquet  Bay,  joining  the 
westermost  point  of  the  great  lake  Michigan,  thence  east 
by  the  parallel  of  46  degrees  of  north  latitude,  which 
will  pass  about  50  miles  north  of  the  most  northern  part 
of  the  great  lake  Michigan,  and  about  25  miles  of  the  lake 
Huron,  100  miles  of  Missillimackmac.1  1 12  of  the  lake  On- 
tario, and  so  on  to  the  first  meridian  of  74  degrees  west 
of  London,  thence  southward  to  the  place  of  beginning, 
being  in  length  as  said  before,  about  700  miles,  and  in 
width  600,  allowing  60  miles  in  a  degree  of  latitude,  and 
contains  420  thousand  square  English  miles. 
The  eastern  boundaries  will  pass  through  Long  Island, 
about  44  miles  eastward  of  New-York,  and  allowing  the 
variation  of  the  compass,  from  the  place  of  beginning 
northward,  brings  the  line  74  degrees  west  longitude, 
through  the  city  of  New- York,  or  very  near  it. 
This  map  is  already  drawn,  but  being  conceived  to  be 
from  too  small  a  scale,  it  is  proposed  to  be  drawn  a  second 
time,  and  to  make  a  scale  of  10  inches  to  every  100  miles, 
which  will  make  5  feet  10  inches  one  way,  and  5  feet  the 


Michillimackinack. 


1768] 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 


189 


other,  from  margin  to  margin;  in  which  will  be  laid 
down  the  true  situation  of  all  the  cities  and  towns,  the 
courses,  width,  and  distances  of  all  the  rivers,  creeks, 
lakes,  roads,  and  .all  other  matters  of  the  least  note.  - 
The  boundaries  of  provinces,  counties  and  townships, 
bays,  inlets,  &c.  &c.  This  map  well  done,  would,  of  con- 
sequence, be  in  great  demand  on  the  continent  of  Amer- 
ica, the  West-India  islands,  and  in  short,  in  all  his  Maj- 
esty's dominions,  and  most  parts  of  Europe.  - 
The  author  has  been  at  a  great  deal  of  pains,  cost  and 
trouble,  for  many  years,  in  bringing  this  work  to  an  ac- 
curacy, from  the  best  observations,  accounts  and  intelli- 
gence he  could  gather,  and  flatters  himself  they  are  genu- 
ine and  good;  but  finding  the  work  will  be  heavy  in  his 
own  hands,  would  be  glad  to  join  one  or  two  Gentlemen 
upon  reasonable  terms,  to  help  him  to  support  the  present 
charge,  the  one  whereof  would  be  well  to  be  the  engraver. 
A  line  to  the  Printer  hereof,  for  the  subscriber,  on  the  sub- 
ject, will  be  gratefully  received  and  acknowledged.  -  -  -  - 
It  is  submitted  to  the  candour  of  gentlemen,  their  aid  and 
encouragement,  in  so  useful  and  great  a  work,  by  their 
very  humble  servant. 

T.  THOMAS.1 

To  BE  SOLD  by  Private  Sale, 
By  the  subscriber,   living  near  the  Head  of  Alloway's 

Creek,  in  this  county  of  Salem,  and  western  division 

of  the  province  of  New-Jersey; 

A  Tract  of  LAND,  adjoining  that  whereon  the  sub- 
scriber now  lives,  containing  about  three  hundred  and 
seventy  acres,  on  which  is  an  improvement  of  thirty  acres 
or  more  of  cleared  land  fenced  into  several  fields,  and  a 
house  of  hewed  logs  with  a  stone  chimney  in  it,  also  a 
small  orchard  of  good  fruit.  On  another  part  of  the  said 

!No  account  of  the  publication  of  this  map  has  been  found.     Was  it 
printed? 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

land  is  a  field  cleared  and  fenced,  with  a  small  orchard  on 
the  same.  There  are  about  thirty  acres  of  swamp  on  said 
land,  suitable  for  meadow.  The  land  is  well  timbered 
with  oak  and  hickory,  suitable  for  staves,. rails,  cord  wood, 
&c.  and  is  convenient  to  several  landings  on  said  Alloways 
creek,  where  shallops  can  come  and  load,  being  not  more 
than  three  miles  distance  to  cart  from  said  land.  There 
also  is  an  advantageous  outlet  for  cattle  and  hogs,  as  there 
is  a  large  quantity  of  unsettled  land  adjoining,  being  good 
feed  for  cattle  in  summer.  Any  person  inclining  to  pur- 
chase the  whole,  or  part  thereof,  may  apply  to  the  sub- 
scriber, view  the  premises,  and  be  informed  of  the  terms 
of  sale. 
.  June  u,  1768  HUGH  BLACKWOOD. 

Five  Pounds  Reward. 

RAN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  the  first  instant,  a  ser- 
vant lad,  named  Thomas  Collagen,  by  trade  a  bricklayer; 
he  is  about  five  feet  five  inches  high,  square  shouldered, 
has  strait  black  hair,  black  eyes,  and  a  downcast  counte- 
nance; he  had  on,  when  he  went  away,  a  sharp  cocked 
felt  hat,  a  brown  coarse  cloth  coat,  with  a  hole  in  the  left 
sleeve,  a  brown  Irish  camblet  jacket,  a  new  check  shirt, 
blue  cloth  breeches,  a  blue  stamped  flannel  patch  upon  one 
of  the  knees,  blue  yarn  stockings,  and  a  pair  of  half  worn 
shoes,  with  one  plain  and  square  brass  buckle,  the  other 
a  round  and  flowered  metal  buckle.  He  boasts  greatly 
of  being  born  in  London,  and  is  very  fond  of  dancing 
and  company.  Whoever  secures  said  apprentice,  so  that 
his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  receive  the  above 
reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges. 

HARMAN  KNICKERBACKER. 

Shrewsbury,  Monmouth  County,  East-Jersey,  June  17, 
1768. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 

Three  Pounds  Reward. 

RAN  away  from  Pitts-Town  Mills,  in  Hunterdon 
county,  New  Jersey,  on  the  night  of  the  7th  of  May  last, 
a  Servant  Man,  named  John  Ryan,  born  in  Ireland,  a 
house  carpenter  by  trade,  about  5  feet  nine  inches  high; 
w^ears  his  own  hair,  which  is  short,  brown,  and  curls  well; 
has  a  remarkable  strut  in  his  gait,  is  neat  in  his  dress ;  and 
talks  thick  and  fast,  especially  when  he  is  in  liquor.  He 
took  with  him  a  lead-coloured  cloth  coat  and  breeches,  a 
white  swanskin  jacket  without  sleeves,  ribb'd  yarn  stock- 
ings, and  worsted  ditto,  a  pair  of  pumps,  a  good  felt  hat, 
a  pair  of  sash  plains,  and  a  large,  young,  mouse-coloured 
dog,  with  a  short  tail.  Whoever  takes  up  said  servant, 
and  secures  him  in  any  gaol,  or  delivers  him  to  Jacob 
Gooding,  at  Pitts-Town  (formerly  called  Hoffs  Town) 
or  to  Moore  Furman  in  Philadelphia,  shall  receive  Three 
Pounds  Reward,  besides  reasonable  charges;  and  Ten 
Shillings  reward  for  delivering  the  mouse  coloured  dog 
to  Jacob  Gooding,  at  Pitts-Town  aforesaid. 
Philadelphia,  June  17,  1768. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  75,  June  13-20, 
1768. 

New-York,  June  16.  Tuesday  Morning  as  a  Boat  was 
coming  from  Elizabeth-Town,  to  this  City,  with  Timber 
across  her  Deck,  a  Negro  Boy  belonging  to  Mr.  Chitwood 
of  Elizabeth-Town,  sitting  upon  the  End  of  the  Timber, 
when  a  sudden  Flaw  of  Wind  took  the  Boat,  which  over- 
set the  Timber,  and  unfortuneately  drowned  the  Boy. — 
Supplement  to  the  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  No.  1328  June  16,  1768. 

Burlington,  June  13.  On  Friday  last  came  on  the  Elec- 
tion of  two  Members  to  represent  this  City  in  the  General 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Assembly  of  New-Jersey,  when  ABRAHAM  HEWLINGS, 
and  JOSEPH  SMITH,  Esquires,  were  unanimously  elected. 
And  this  Day  came  on  the  Election  of  two  Representa- 
tives for  the  County  of  Burlington,  when  HENRY  PAX- 
SON,  and  JOSEPH  BULLOCK,  Esquires,  were  also  unani- 
mously chosen. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Act  of  General  Assembly  of  the  Prov- 
ince of  New- Jersey,  lately  passed,  intituled,  An  Act  for 
the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors;  we,  the  Subscribers,  be- 
ing now  confined  in  the  Goal  of  the  County  of  Hunter- 
don,  and  having  petitioned  the  Judges  of  the  Supreme 
Court  for  the  Benefit  of  the  said  Act,  do  give  Notice  to 
all  our  Creditors,  to  appear  and  shew  Cause,  if  any  they 
have,  on  the  I2th  Day  of  July  next,  at  2  o' Clock  in  the 
Afternoon  of  the  same  Day,  before  the  Judges  of  the  said 
Court,  at  the  Dwelling-house  of  Rensalier  Williams,  in 
Trenton,  why  we  should  not  be  discharged,  agreeable  to 
the  Directions  of  the  said  Act. 

JOHN  HICKS,  Jos.  STOUT,  WILLIAM  HEWLINGS. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2060,  June  i6> 
1768. 

The  CENTINEL.    No.  XIII. 

THERE  seems  to  be  something  perverse  in  human  Na- 
ture, that  prompts  Men  to  give  partial  and  unfair  Repre- 
sentations, when  it  suits  their  Purpose.  They  conceal 
Truths,  extenuate  Faults,  .... 

Dr.  Chandler  seems  in  his  Appeal,  to  labour  under  this 
Infirmity:  he  complains  that  the  Episcopal  Church  in 
America  suffers  unparalleled  Hardships :  he  insinuates 
that  the  Complaints  which  he  makes  are  the  Complaints 
of  a  Million  of  British  Subjects  in  America,  suffering  un- 
der unprecedented  Hardships;  and  that  all  the  Episcopal 
Clergy  and  Laity  are  joint  Petitioners  with  him  and  his 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 93 

Friends  for  an  American  Episcopate,  on  the  Plan  he  has 
mentioned.  Whereas,  in  Fact,  the  People  were  never  con- 
sulted on  the  Measure,  nor  were  they  ever  heard  to  com- 
plain. The  whole  was  concerted  and  carried  on  by  a  few 
Missionaries  (whom  the  Doctor  .stiles  the  Clergy)  of 
New- York  and  New- Jersey  met  together  in  a  voluntary 
Convention.  By  what  Right  they  assume  such  Power  it 
may  be  well  to  enquire 

I  would  therefore  be  glad  to  know  by  what  Authority 
the  Missionaries  of  New-York  and  New-Jersey,  in  Vio- 
lation of  the  Constitution  of  the  British  Governments,  and 
of  the  Rights  of  their  fellow  Subjects  usurp  a  Power  of 
acting  for  all  the  Episcopalians  in  America;  ....  Let 
the  World  then  judge  whether  the  Petitions  sent  Home 
by  the  Missionaries  of  New- York  and  the  Jerseys,  and 
the  Appeal  published  by  Doct.  C.  as  far  as  they  respect  the 
Islands,  are  not  an  insolent  Invasion  of  the  Rights  of  oth- 
ers, and  a  busy  intermeddling  with  their  Laws  and  Con- 
stitutions without  their  Consent  and  Approbation. 

The  same  may  be  said  of  Virginia  and  Maryland.  .  . 
.  .  These  Governments  have  provided  for  the  Mainte- 
nance of  the  Clergy,  in  a  Way  most  agreeable  to  them- 
selves, and  when  they  think  it  necessary  to  have  a  Bishop, 
they  will,  doubtless,  fall  upon  Measures  to  have  one.  But 
what  Right  the  Missionaries  of  New- York  and  New-Jer- 
sey have  to  publish  Complaints  in  the  Name  of  these  Peo- 
ple, while  they  themselves  are  silent,  or  to  represent  their 
Sufferings  as  intolerable  and  their  Grievances  as  unpar- 
alleled, while  they  themselves  express  no  Uneasiness,  I 
cannot  well  comprehend. 

RUN  AWAY  on  Sunday  last,  the  2gth  of  May,  from  the 
subscriber,  living  at  Hardiston,  Sussex  County,  East  New- 
Jersey,  a  straight  spare  Irish  indented  servant  man,  named 
James  Quin;  about  19  or  20  years  of  age,  5  feet  nine 

13 


IQ4  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

inches  high,  black  straight  hair,  remarkable  large  broad 
black  eye  brows,  which  are  joined  together;  light  eyes, 
clear  complexion,  somewhat  pale,  down  look,  having  lived 
in  a  Dutch  family  has  but  little  of  the  Irish  accent  in  his 
speech,  and  can  read  and  write  very  well;  he  had  on  when 
he  went  away  an  oznabrug  shirt  with  a  white  linen  collar, 
a  pair  of  old  leather  breeches,  with  check'd  trowsers  over 
them;  a  new  homespun  waistcoat  of  mixt  blue  and  black, 
with  a  white  stripe,  without  buttons;  a  redish  brown  lin- 
sey  wolsey  homespun  upper  jacket  somewhat  worn,  with 
pewter  buttons;  a  pair  of  grey  worsted  stockings,  a  pair 
of  good  double  soaled  shoes,  with  large  round  copper 
buckles;  and  a  large  wool  hat,  two  months  worn;  has 
been  employed  in  America,  only  in  farming  business,  is  a 
civil  well  behaved  young  man.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
returns  said  runaway,  or  secures  him  in  any  goaj,  shall 
receive  FIVE  POUNDS  proclamation  money  reward,  besides 
all  reasonable  charges.  BENJAMIN  NORTHUP. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  and  others  are  hereby 
warned  not  to  harbour,  conceal  or  carry  him  off,  as  they 
will  answer  it  at  their  peril. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal, 
No.  1332,  June  16,  1768. 

A  Correspondent  at  Princeton  informs .  us,  that,  on 
Wednesday  the  22d  ult.  The  Poll  for  Representatives  in 
the  County  of  Somerset,  East-New-Jersey,  was  closed. 
HENDRICK  FISHER,  and  John  Berien,  Esquires,  with  Jus- 
tice ROY,  were  the  only  Candidates;  and  the  two  former 

were  elected. Though  the  last  is  a  Gentleman  greatly 

respected,  and  who  was  strongly  supported,  he  declined 
the  Assistance  of  his  Friends,  and  genteely  favoured 
Judge  BERIEN'S  superior  Merit;  otherwise  it  is  difficult 
to  determine  whether  Mr.  ROY  would  not  have  been 
chosen. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 95 


The  College  of  New-Jersey,  upon  which  we  all  have 
had  our  eyes  fixed,  for  furnishing  our  Churches  with  a 
gracious,  holy,  humble  and  learned  Ministry,  have  wisely 
judged  that  gentlemens  sons  are  the  only  likely  persons  to 
answer  our  expectations;  and  have  accordingly  passed 
an  Act,  that  none  shall  be  admitted  to  the  College,  but 
those  who  are  able  to  continue  four  years ;  and  they  have 
provided  a  Professor  of  Divinity,  who,  if  well  attended 
for  a  year  or  two  more,  will  fit  these  gracious,  holy,  hum- 
ble (and  I  may  add  rich)  youths  for  the  Ministry;  and 
the  expence  at  a  moderate  computation  will  not  exceed 
£.  300,  which  is  but  a  trifling  sum  for  a  gentleman,  in  that 
important  business.  You  will  imagine,  perhaps,  that  the 
pious  Poor  are  to  be  shut  out.  No;  a  gentleman  of  that 
faculty  told  me  that,  "if  a  young  man  of  exemplary  piety, 
"promising  abilities,  and  sufficiently  forward  in  learning 
"to  enter  the  junior  class,  would,  upon  a  certificate  that 
"he  and  his  parents  were  so  poor,  that  they  were  not  able 
"to  support  him  more  than  two  years,  make  application 
"for  admittance,  he  might  be  taken  in  as  a  poor  scholar!' 

B.  O. 


— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  76,  June  20-27, 
1768. 


New-York,  June  16.  On  Tuesday  last,  a  Boat  coming 
here  from  Elizabeth-Town,  belonging  to  Mr.  Bunnel  of 
that  Place,  having  on  board  a  Quantity  of  Timber,  lying 
a  Cross  the  Vessel,  on  which  was  a  Negro  Boy  belonging 
to  Mr.  Chetwood  of  the  same  Town,  a  sudden  Flaw  of 
Wind  heel'd  the  Boat  so  much  that  the  Timber  with  the 
Boy  upon  it  fell  overboard,  and  the  Boy  was  seen  no  more, 
and  as  the  Water  where  he  fell  appear'd  bloody,  it  is  sup- 
posed he  was  crush'd  by  the  Timber. — The  New  York 
Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1328,  June  16,  1768. 


196  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

New-York,  June  20.  The  Sally,  Rankin,  from  Newry, 
for  Philadelphia,  mentioned  in  our  last,  to  be  on  shore  at 
Little  Egg-Harbour,  is  gone  all  to  Pieces. 

RuN-away,  from  the  Subscriber,  living  at  Pumpton,  in 
New-Jersey,  on  Saturday  the  4th  Instant,  a  Negro  Man 
named  Harry,  40  Years  old,  much  pitted  with  the  Small- 
Pox,  and  can  speak  both  Dutch  and  English,  plays  on  the 
Violin,  and  loves  GROG  :  Had  on  when  he  went  away  a 
blue  Broad  cloth  Coat,  a  blue  and  white  Holland  Jacket, 
red  Cloth  Breeches,  and  new  Shoes  with  brown  Yarn 
Stockings.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  the  said  Negro 
Fellow,  so  that  he  may  be  had  again,  shall  receive  Five 
Dollars  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges,  from 

JOHN  ACTON. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
868,  June  20,  1768. 

ON  reading  the  Governor  of  New-Jersey's  speech  to  the 
assembly,  the  I5th  of  April  last,  it  afforded  me  pleasure 
to  find  so  strongly  recommended  (among  other  matters) 
the  roads  being  put  in  better  order,  which  the  legislative 
body  have  doubtless  attended  to  accordingly. 

It's  much  to  be  wish'd  the  inhabitants,  in  said  province, 
for  their  own  benefit,  likewise  the  satisfaction  and  ease  of 
the  numerous  strangers,  travelling  so  frequent  to  and  from 
different  provinces  and  colonies  thro'  New-Jersey,  wou'd 
join  voluntarily  and  industriously  to  prevent  future  cause 
of  complaint,  as  far  as  in  their  power. 

Suffer  me  to  urge  and  recommend,  while  so  useful  a 
regulation  is  undertaken  and  forwarded,  which  I  trust 
will  be  attended  with  dispatch,  under  the  direction  and  in- 
spection of  such  prudent  trustees  or  overseers  appointed 
for  said  service,  that  there  may  appear  more  attention  and 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  1 97 

regard  than  hitherto,  to  the  safety  of  all  travellers,  by  a 
better  repair  of  the  wood  and  log  bridges,  especially  on  the 
most  public  roads,  which  it  must  be  allowed  loudly  calls  in 
sundry  places,  for  speedy  and  more  effectual  amendment. 
Permit  me  further  to  propose  and  request,  that  at  the 
forks,  or  where  the  roads  cross  and  divide,  there  may  be 
(where  as  yet  none)  POSTS  erected  and  fixed  with  plain 
directions  to  what  place  each  lead,  or  conduct  the  stranger ; 
as  pleasingly  appears  in  Burlington  county.  The  want  of 
this  useful  and  desirable  intelligence  being  more  general, 
has  augmented  the  anxiety  and  fatigue  of  many  weary  per- 
sons, particularly  such  who  are  obliged  to  travel  on  foot, 
some  perhaps  with  a  burden  of  body,  besides  clothes  or 
other  articles,  who  are  in  great  distress  on  finding  (as  in 
many  places)  no  ready  means  to  obtain  information  which 
road  to  take.  The  smallness  of  the  expence  attending  this 
beneficial  proposal,  and  the  good  effects  productive  thereof, 
deliberately  consider'd,  I  presume,  leaves  little  room  to 
doubt  of  proper  measures  being  soon  taken  for  its  accom- 
plishment. Which  will  be  not  only  laudable  but  exem- 
plary; and  it  is  to  be  hoped  promote  generally,  and  with 
alacrity  in  every  other  province  and  colony. 

A  TRAVELLER. 

Elisabeth-Town,  June  n,  1768. 

STRAYED  from  a  Pasture  in  this  Town,  about  five  Weeks 
ago,  a  small  (Virginia  bred)  light  bay  Horse;  he  paces 
naturally,  has  a  white  Face  and  four  White  Feet,  with 
grey  Hairs  in  his  Tail.  Whoever  takes  up  and  brings  the 
above  to  the  House  of  WILLIAM  P.  SMITH,  Esq;  or  can 
give  Intelligence,  by  which  he  may  be  recovered,  shall  re- 
ceive a  PISTOLE  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid. 

Perth- Amboy,  June  16,  1768. 
BY  Order  of  Stephen  Skinner,  Rune  Runyon,  and  Jon- 


198  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

athan  Frazee,  Esqrs.  Judges  of  the  Inferior  Court  of  Com- 
mon Pleas,  for  the  County  of  Middlesex,  in  the  Province 
of  New- Jersey :  Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  Creditor  or 
Creditors,  respectively,  of  Martin  Hoogeland,  Benjamin 
Britain,  and  Edward  Kight.  Insolvent  Debtors,  in  the 
Gaol  of  the  said  County  of  Middlesex;  to  shew  Cause,  if 
any  they  have,  before  the  said  Judges,  at  the  House  of 
Elijah  Dunham,  Innholder,  in  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy, 
in  the  County  of  Middlesex  aforesaid,  on  Wednesday  the 
1 3th  Day  of  July  next,  at  10  o'Clock  in  the  Forenoon,  why 
an  Assignment  of  the  said  Debtors  Estates,  respectively, 
should  not  be  made,  and  the  said  Debtors  discharged,  pur- 
suant to  the  Directions  of  a  late  Act  of  the  Governor, 
Council,  and  General  Assembly  of  this  Province,  entitled, 
"An  Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors." 

Perth-Amboy,  June  17,  1768. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Act  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the 
Province  of  New- Jersey,  lately  published,  entitled,  "An 
Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors,"  we  the  Sub- 
scribers being  confined  in  the  Gaol  in  the  County  of  Mid- 
dlesex, and  having  petitioned  the  Hon.  Frederick  Smith, 
Esq;  Chief  Justice  of  the  Province,  and  John  Berrien,  Esq; 
one  of  the  Justices  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  said  Province, 
and  lodged  a  Schedule  and  Inventory  of  our  Estates  in 
the  Secretary's  Office,  in  Perth-Amboy;  do  give  Notice 
to  all  our  Creditors  to  appear,  and  shew  Cause,  if  any 
they  have,  on  the  7th  Day  of  September  next,  at  12 
o'Clock  of  said  Day,  at  the  Court-House  in  Perth-Amboy, 
before  the  said  Justices,  why  we  should  not  be  discharged, 
agreeable  to  the  Directions  of  the  said  Act. 

JOHN  FEAVEL.     DRAKE  DUNN. 

N civ-Jersey,  June  14,  1768. 
THE  Subscriber,  who  lately  kept  the  King's  Arms  Tav- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS;  199 

ern,  in  Princeton,  begs  Leave  to  acquaint  his  Friends  in 
particular,  and  the  Public  in  general,  that  he  has  removed 
to  the  commodious  Inn,  in  Princeton,  long  known  by  the 
name  of  Hiidibras1-;  where  having  furnished  the  House 
with  the  best  of  Liquors,  and  proposing  from  time  to  time 
to  supply  it  writh  the  best  Provisions  he  can  procure  in  the 
Situation;  he  flatters  himself  he  shall  be  able  to  entertain 
Travellers  and  others  in  the  best  Manner,  as  he  is  deter- 
mined to  apply  himself  to  give  general  Satisfaction.  He 
hopes  for  the  Continuation  of  the  Custom  of  his  Friends, 
and  that  of  any  other  Gentlemen,  who  will  please  to  favour 
him  with  their  Custom,  shall  be  gratefully  acknowledged ; 
by  the  Public's 

Obliged  humble  Servant, 

JACOB  HYER. 

N.  B.  As  the  Stage- Waggons  from  New-York  to  Phil- 
adelphia, and  back,  put  up  at  his  House,  any  Person  in- 
clining to  send  Goods  or  Parcels  by  that  Conveyance,  may 
depend  on  their  being  carefully  forwarded. 

||  *  ||.  He  continues  to  follow  the  Hatter's  Business  in 
all  its  Branches,  as  usual. — The  New  York  Gazette  or 
Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1329,  June  20,  1768. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

By  JAMES  ABEEL, 

Near  the  ALB  ANY- PIER; 

HOLLOW-WARE  of  all  Kinds,  made  at  Vesuvius  Fur- 
nace, at  Newark,2  in  New-Jersey,  and  allowed  by  the  best 
Judges  to  be  far  preferable  to  any  made  in  America. 

Five  Dollars  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  Daniel  Taylor,  of  Newark  Mountains, 
in  New- Jersey,  on  Thursday  the  i6th  June  Instant,  an  in- 
dented Servant  Man,  named  James  M'Donnough;  he 

i  At  least  as  early  as  1761.     See  N.  J.  Archives,  XX.,  620. 

8  One  of  the  earliest  mentions  of  the  iron  industry  at  Newark. 


200  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

speaks  the  Irish  Brogue  pretty  strong,  is  about  20  Years 
of  Age,  of  a  brown  Complexion;  has  dark  brown  Hair, 
which  he  wears  tied,  and  is  about  5  Feet  4  Inches  high, 
pretty  well  set;  when  he  ran  away  he  took  with  him  an 
Axe  new  jump'd,  and  had  on  a  Regimental  Cap  turn'd  up 
with  red,  an  old  brown  cloth  jacket  made  Sailor  Fashion, 
a  Tow  Cloth  Shirt,  a  ragged  Pair  of  Tow  Cloth  Trowsers, 
and  no  Shoes  or  Stockings.  Whoever  apprehends  the 
above  run  away  Servant,  and  secures  him  so  that  the  said 
Daniel  Taylor,  may  have  him  again,  shall  be  paid  the 
above  Reward  of  Five  Dollars,  and  all  reasonable  Charges 
by  the  said  Daniel  Taylor.- — The  New  York  Journal  or 
General  Advertiser,  No.  1329,  June  23,  1768. 

WHEREAS  I,  the  Subscriber,  did,  in  the  Pennsylvania 
Gazette,  No.  2059,  and  likewise  in  the  Pennsylvania 
Chronicle,  No.  73,  advertise  a  certain  Nathan  Collins, 
having  absconded  from  the  usual  Place  of  his  Abode,  and 
enticed  away  with  him  an  Apprentice  Boy,  named  Joseph 
Sharp.  Now,  these  are  to  inform  the  Public,  that  the 
Friends  and  Relations  of  the  said  Nathan  Collins  have  en- 
gaged to  make  me  full  Satisfaction  on  that  Account,  and 
that  the  said  Nathan  Collins  may  pass  unmolested  for  any 
Thing  I  have  at  present  against  him,  as  no  Reward,  for 
apprehending  him,  will  be  paid  by  me 

WILLIAM  DOWNS. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.   2061,  June  23, 
1768. 

On  Thursday  last  ROBERT  FRIEND  PRICE,  and  JOHN 
HINCHMAN,  Esquires,  were  elected  Representatives  for 
Gloucester  County,  in  New- Jersey. — The  Pennsylvania 
Gazette,  No.  2061,  June  23,  1768. 

The  CENTINEL.    No.  XIV. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  2OI 

....  Thus  in  calculating  the  Number  of  Petitioners 
for  establishing-  an  Episcopate  in  the  Colonies,  he  takes  in 
the  People  of  the  Sugar  Islands,  and  Southern  Colonies, 
altho'  never  consulted  in  the  forming  or  forwarding  the 
Seven  Petitions,  drawn  up  by  the  Missionaries  of  New- 
York  and  New-Jersey;  because  Members  of  his  Church 
abound  in  tjiose  Parts,  and  every  Episcopalian,  as  a  true 
son  of  the  Church,  must  in  the  Doctor's  Judgement,  be  at 
least  a  virtual  Supplicant  on  this  important  Occasion. 
.  .  .  .  In  three  of  the  New-England  Governments, 
where  a  very  lax  kind  of  Religious  Establishment  has  ob- 
tained, the  Episcopal  Ministers  are  entituled  to  that  Part  of 
the  Tax  levied  for  supporting  the  Clergy,  which  arised 
from  their  own  Church  Members.  In  the  City  of  New- 
York,  and  in  some  of  the  Counties  of  that  Colony,  part  of 
the  Poor  Tax  is  taken  to  maintain  their  Ministers.  In 
Rhode-Island,  New-Jersey,  and  Pennsylvania,  they  are  on 
a  Footing  with  the  most  favoured.  And  in  all  the  Old 
Colonies,  North-East  of  Maryland.  ....  The  Rev'd 
Mr.  Thompson,  itinerant  Missionary  in  the  Counties  of 
York,  and  Cumberland,  acquainted  his  venerable  Patrons 
the  same  Year,  that  his  People  within  those  Counties,  did 
not  exceed  202  Souls;  altho'  it  is  well  known  those  Dis- 
tricts contained  at  that  Time,  Thirty  or  Forty  Thousand 
Inhabitants.  And  the  Rev'd  Mr.  Murray  of  Berks  Coun- 
ty, complained  that  his  People  at  Mollattin,  were  reduced 
by  Removals,  to  Twenty-nine  Families ;  that  he  despaired 
of  seeing  a  Church  built  within  his  Mission;  and  expected 
soon  to  be  reduced  to  the  Society's  Allowance  for  his  Sup- 
port. The  Episcopal  Societies  in  New-York  and  New- 
Jersey  are  in  very  little  better  Circumstances.  At  Cohan- 
zie,  in  West-Jersey  stands  a  Church,  but  there  is  not  the 
Shadow  of  a  Congregation  in  the  County.  At  Salem  the 
Episcopal  Cause  is  almost  as  low.  It  would  be  tedious,  as 
it  is  needless,  to  multiply  Instances  to  illustrate  this  Mat- 


202  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

ter :  Suffice  it  to  say,  that  it  is  in  the  Cities  and  some  of 
the  larger  Towns  only,  that  their  Congregations  are  nu- 
merous. Yet  the  Episcopal  Church  in  the  non-episcopal 
Colonies,  never  was  in  such  outwardly  flourishing  Cir- 
cumstances:  And  no  Wonder;  ....  How  unjust, 
how  ungrateful  then,  are  these  Missionaries  of  New-York 
and  New-Jersey  in  their  Complaints  of  Hardships,  Griev- 
ances and  Persecution.  They  are  unjust  to  their  Fellow 
Subjects,  among  whom  they  reside :  Ungrateful  to  their 
Patrons  and  Benefactors  in  Europe :  and  their  Behaviour 
must  reflect  severely  on  their  own  Characters,  wherever 
this  Unfairness  and  Disingenuity  shall  be  opened  up. 

No  one  will  assert,  that  the  Whites  of  the  Doctor's 
Church  in  America,  amount  to  "a  Million  nearly."  We 

may  very  well  say,  they  are  not  half  that  number 

Behold  a  Crowd  of  Negroes,  in  the  Islands,  and  Southern 
Colonies,  almost  all  of  whom  "are  not  Christians  at  all," 
slipt  into  the  Episcopal  Scale,  in  order  to  ballance,  in  some 
Measure,  the  dead  Weight  of  Non-conformists  in  the 
Northern  Colonies;  and  yet  it  kicks  the  beam!  Behold 
at  least  500,000  virtual  Churchmen,  virtually  petitioning 
by  their  Friends  the  Clergy  of  New-York  and  New- Jer- 
sey for  Bishops !  What  low  Artifice  is  this  !....— 
The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1333,  June  23,  1768. 

Providence,  June  1 1 . 

On  the  3Oth  ult.  died  at  Middletown,  in  New- Jersey  in 
the  28th  year  of  his  age,  Mr.  WILLIAM  WILEY,  an  emi- 
nent distiller,  formerly,  an  inhabitant  of  this  place,  of 
which  he  was  a  native  -  -  -  a  gentleman  of  acknowledged 
uprightness  and  integrity,  whose  benevolent  mind,  and 
rectitude  of  life,  added  to  his  agreeable  converse,  and  en- 
gaging manner,  rendered  him  universally  beloved  and  re- 
spected. He  was  a  strenuous  asserter  of  the  liberties  of 


1768]  NEWSPAPER   EXTRACTS.  2O3 

his  country  -  -  -  a  zealous  advocate  for  the  welfare  of 
Britain  and  America,  whose  interests,  from  the  solidity 
of  his  judgment  he  was  led  to  consider  as  inseparably  con- 
nected; but  an  enemy  to  every  measure  that  wore  the  least 
glimmering  of  oppression  :  He  bore  a  lingering  and  pain- 
ful disorder,  with  that  fortitude  and  resignation  which  so 
eminently  characterise  the  Christian  and  the  man;  fully 
convinced  of  this  great  truth 

"Death  is  victory; 

"It  binds  in  chains  the  raging  ills  of  life." 

He  met  his  dissolution  with  that  chearfulness  and  se- 
renity, which  are  ever  the  emanations  of  a  conscious  vir- 
tuous mind,  and  which  none  but  the  truly  pious  can  form 
a  proper  idea  of,  in  full  assurance,  that  a  life  devoted  to 
the  cause  of  virtue  would  be  rewarded  with  an  inheritance 
among-  the  blessed. 

I  SHOULD  think  myself  wanting  in  Gratitude,  to  my  kind 
Customers,  and  undeserving  of  their  future  Favour,  if  I 
should  neglect  to  return  them  most  humble  and  unfeigned 
Thanks  for  the  Public  spirit  and  Benevolence  they  have 
uniformly  shown  in  promoting  the  Success  of  the  PENN- 
SYLVANIA CHRONICLE,  from  its  first  Beginning  to  this 

Day 

[signed]  The  PRINTER.1 

N.  B.  All  Orders  from  Town  or  Country,  for  News- 
Papers,  Advertisements,  or  any  Kind  of  Printing  Work, 

will  be  carefully  observed,  and  punctually  executed It 

gives  me  very  particular  Pleasure  to  find  the  Chronicle  is 
so  well  calculated  to  serve  my  advertising  Customers,  es- 
pecially those  of  the  Provinces  of  Pennsylvania,  New- 
Jersey,  Maryland,  and  Virginia,  who  have  reaped  consid- 

i  William   Goddard.   who  began   the   Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  January   6, 
1767. 


204  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

erable  Advantages  by  kindly  endeavouring  to  serve  a 
young  Beginner  in  a  very  expensive  Undertaking. 

THE  Subscriber  takes  this  method  to  acquaint  the  Pub- 
lic, that  she  has  opened  her  house  opposite  the  college,  in 
Princeton,  New-Jersey,  to  accommodate  all  persons  who 
travel  in  the  stage- waggons,  or  otherways,  with  private 
lodging.  PARNEL  DAVENPORT. 

N.  B.  The  said  Parnel  Davenport,  widow,  continues 
boarding,  as  usual. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  77, 
June  2?-July  4,  1768. 

Mrs.  JOHNSON, 

NOTIFIES  the  Public,  that  she  has  removed  to  the  large 
and  commodious  House  commonly  called  the  White- 
House,  at  the  Sign  of  the  Duke  of  Rutland,  in  Elizabeth- 
Town,  where  she  proposes  to  keep  a  public  House  of  EN- 
TERTAINMENT, and  hopes  for  the  Favour  of  her  old  Cus- 
tomers. 

Neiv-York,  June  27.  Capt.  Tingley,  (in  the  Brig  Olive 
Branch)  who  arrived  here  on  Tuesday  last  in  7  Weeks 
from  Bristol,  spoke  with  a  Brig  90  Leagues  off  Long- 
Island,  from  Newark  bound  for  London. 

The  following  GENTLEMEN  are  returned  REPRESENTA- 
TIVES, in  the  NEW-JERSEY  ASSEMBLY,  for  the  undermen- 
tioned Counties. 

Somerset.     Hendrick  Fisher  and  John  Berrien,  Esqrs. 

Monmouth.  Rob.  Hartshorne  and  Edward  Taylor, 
Esqrs. 

Middlesex.    John  Wetherill  and  Reune  Runyan,  Esqrs. 

Essex.    John  Ogden  and  Stephen  Crane,  Esqrs. 

Bergen.     Tunis  Dey  and  John  De  Moray,1  Esqrs. 

Gloucester.  Robert  Friend  Price  and  John  Hinchman, 
Esqrs. 

City  of  PERTH-AMBOY.     Cortland  Skinner  and  John 


Demaresl. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  2O$ 

Johnson,  Esqrs. — The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post 
Boy,  No.  1330,  June  27,  1768. 

College  of  Philadelphia,  June  21,  1768. 

THIS  Day,  which  may  be  considered  as  having  given 
Birth  to  Medical  Honors  in  America,  the  following  Gen- 
tlemen were  admitted  to  the  Degree  of  BACHELOR  OF 
PHYSIC,  viz.  Messieurs  JOHN  ARCHER,  of  New-Castle 
County,  BENJAMIN  COWELL,  of  Bucks  County,  SAMUEL 
DUFFIELD,  of  Philadelphia,  JONATHAN  ELMER,  of  West 
Jersey,  HUMPHREY  FULLERTON,  of  Lancaster  County, 
DAVID  JACKSON,  of  Chester  County,  JOHN  LAWRENCE  of 
East  Jersey,  JONATHAN  POTTS,  of  Philadelphia,  JAMES 
TILTON  of  Kent  County,  and  NICHOLAS  WAY,  of  Wil- 
mington, New  Castle  County 

The  Provost,  after  opening  the  Commencement  with 
Prayers,  introduced  the  Business  of  the  Day  with  a  short 
Latin  Oration;  then  followed, 

i.  A  Latin  Oration  delivered  with  great  Propriety  by 
Mr.  LAWRENCE,  "De  Honoribus,  qui  omni  JEvo  in  veros 
Medicinse  Cultores  collati  fuerent."  .... 

PHILADELPHIA,  June  30.  Sunday  last  came  to  Town 
Captain  Graham,  of  the  Sloop  Kingston,  bound  from  this 
Port  for  the  Grenades,  who  informs,  that  he  left  our  Capes 
the  6th  Instant,  and  on  the  nth  the  Sloop  sprung  a  Leak; 
that  on  the  I2th,  it  increased  so  fast,  they  could  scarce  keep 
her  free  with  both  Pumps,  and  were  obliged  to  throw  some 
of  the  Flour  and  Lumber  overboard;  that  oruthe  I3th  he 
bore  away  for  our  Capes;  and  arrived  off  of  Townsend's 
Inlet  on  the  24th,  the  Hands  being  almost  worn  out  with 
constant  pumping. 

ARRIVALS.     At  Barbadoes,  Morgan,  from  Salem. 

Sussex  County,  New-Jersey.  June  28,  1768. 
WHEREAS  I  NICHOLAS  SMITH  gave  RICHARD  SHAK- 


206  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

LETON  two  bonds,  for  One  Hundred  Pounds  each,  bearing- 
date  April  1764,  and  a  title  bond  for  a  piece  of  land,  and 
he  not  performing  his  contract  with  me,  these  are  to  fore- 
warn any  person  from  taking  an  assignment  of  said  bonds, 
as  I  am  determined  not  to  pay  the  same. 

NICHOLAS  SMITH. 

Sussex  County  on  Delaware,  Three  Run  Mills, 

June  24,  1768. 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber,  on  the  I3th  of  Septem- 
ber last,  one  Mulattoe  slave,  named  Harry,  about  40  years 
of  age,  5  feet  6  inches  high,  and  well  set.  Had  on,  when 
he  went  away,  a  brown  cloth  coat,  white  linen  jacket,  and 
brown  breeches ;  he  was  bred  to  a  miller,  and  understands 
very  well  how  to  manufacture  flour,  and  can  invoice  the 
same;  is  much  given  to  strong  drink,  and  playing  on  the 
violin;  understands  the  carpenter's  and  millwright's  busi- 
nesses midling  well ;  was  removed  from  East  New-Jersey 
in  the  year  1762,  by  one  Nicholas  Veight,  who  lived  at 
Rockey-Hill,  and  kept  a  mill.  The  said  fellow  has  a  free 
wife,  named  Peg,  and  two  children,  which  are  supposed  to 
be  somewhere  in  the  province  of  East  New- Jersey.  I  am 
told  the  said  Mulattoe  has  got  a  pass.  Any  person  or  per- 
sons that  will  secure  the  said  Mulattoe  in  any  of  his  Maj- 
esty's goals,  so  that  the  owner  may  have  him  again,  shall 
have  TEN  POUNDS  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid 
by  Mr.  CHARLES  WHARTON,  merchant,  in  Philadelphia; 
or  by  LEVIN  CRAPPER. 

Baltimore-Town.  June  20,  1768. 

TAKEN  up,  and  committed  to  Baltimore  Town  Goal,  on 
suspicion  of  being  runaways,  viz. 

Timothy  Mahony,  an  Irishman 

Richard  Whitaker,  or  Whitacre,  a  shoemaker  by  trade, 
about  22  or  23  years  of  age,  short  black  hair,  has  a  mole 


1/68] 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 


207 


under  his  right  eye,  near  the  ear,  and  another  on  the  left 
side  of  his  neck;  he  had,  when  taken,  a  leathern  budget, 
with  the  words  New-Jersey,  in  yellow  or  gold  letters,  in 
which  are  his  tools;  he  produces  a  pass,  signed  John  Jar- 
man,  one  of  his  Majesty's  justices  of  the  peace  for  the 
county  of  Salem,  which  pass  is  supposed  to  be  forged,  it 
being  very  badly  wrote,  and  much  worse  spelt ;  there  was 
also  found  on  him  a  bond,  signed  by  John  Buck,  of  Deer- 
field  Township,  in  the  county  of  Cumberland,  and  province 
of  West  Jersey,  for  46  1.  lawful  money  of  West  Jersey, 
payable  to  Richard  Whitaker,  and  witnessed  by  William 
M'Gill. 

If  not  claimed,  and  fetched  away,  in  one  month  from  the 
date  hereof,  they  will  be  sold  out  for  their  fees,  by 

DANIEL  CHAMIER,  Sheriff. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2062,  June  30, 
1768. 

THE  MAP  advertised  in  No.  21  of  vol.  II  of  this  paper, 
is  by  the  advice  of  some  gentlemen,  much  enlarged.  .  .  . 

[signed]     T.  THOMAS. 

A  Letter  from  a  Gentleman  of  Distinction  in  Boston, 
mentions,  that  the  Conduct  of  the  Colonies  of  Virginia, 
Maryland.  New-Jersey,  Connecticut  and  Rhode-Island, 
has  given  the  greatest  Satisfaction  to  every  Friend  to  Am- 
erican Liberty,  and  that  they  were  persuaded  the  respect- 
able Colonies  of  Pennsylvania,  Carolinas,  New- York,  and 
New-Hampshire,  would,  as  soon  as  they  have  Opportu- 
nity, distinguish  themselves  in  like  manner. 

MADE  his  escape  from  the  subscriber  John  Stymets, — 
JONATHAN  STOUT,  of  Hunterdon  county,  in  West  New- 
Jersey.  He  lives  at  Penny-Town.1  He  is  a  lusty  stout 
fellow,  and  values  himself  much  upon  fighting.  He  for- 

'Now  Pennington.     The  latter  name  was  used  as  early  as  1747. 


208  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

merly  was  an  officer  in  the  New-Jersey  regiment.  Who- 
ever takes  up  said  Stout,  and  secures  him  in  any  of  his 
Majesty's  gaols,  in  New  Jersey,  shall  have  Thirty  Shil- 
lings reward,  paid  by  me, 

JOHN  STYMETS. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  78,  July  4-11, 
1768. 

To  be  sold,  or  exchanged  for  a  House  and  Lot,  in  the  City 
of  New- York,  that  is  convenient  for  a  Seafaring  Man; 

A  Farm,  pleasantly  situated  within  a  Mile  of  the  Town 
of  Shrewsbury,  near  a  Mill  Pond.  The  Farm  is  divided 
into  two  Lots,  each  containing  six  Acres,  well  water'd, 
with  a  Dwell  ing-House,  and  other  Conveniencies,  on  each 
Lot,  and  an  Orchard  of  very  good  Fruit  Trees.  One  of 
the  Houses  is  new,  has  a  Well  of  good  Water  24  deep, 
very  handy  to  it;  a  Pail  Garden,  Hen-House,  and  about 
20  or  30  English  Cherry  Trees  around  the  Dwelling, 
which  lies  adjoining  the  Road,  and  is  a  good  Situation  for 
any  Tradesman,  being  in  a  plentiful  Part  of  the  Country. 
Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase  or  exchange,  on  reason- 
able Terms,  may  apply  to  George  Crookskank,  next  Door 
to  Mr.  Lawrence's,  on  Golden-Hill,  New-York — The  New 
York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  870,  July  4,  1768. 

M ilst one,  New- Jersey,  June  2 1 .  Yesterday  came  on  our 
election,  and  continued  by  adjournment  to  this  day,  when 
Hendrick  Fisher1  and  John  Berrien^  Esqrs.  were  elected 
representatives  for  the  county  of  Somerset :  The  election 
was  carried  on  with  the  greatest  coolness  and  good  order : 
no  reflecting  nor  abusive  words  were  heard  during  the 

i For  a  sketch  of  Hendrick  Fisher,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  XIX.,  390. 

2  The  Berriens  are  believed  to  have  been  of  French  origin.  The  pro- 
genitor of  the  American  family  bore  the  very  Dutch  name  of  Cornells 
Jansen  Berrien.  He  was  in  Flatffcsh,  L.  I.,  as  early  as  1669,  and  there 
m.  Jannetie,  dau.  of  Jan.  Stryker.  Among  her  children  was  Peter,  b. 
1672,  m.  (1706)  Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Samuel  Edsall,  a  member  of  the  Coun- 
cil of  East  Jersey.  Peter  had  several  children,  one  of  whom  was  John 
Berrien  b.  Nov.  19,  1711;  removed  to  Rocky  Hill,  Somerset  county,  N. 
J  and  there  m.  Margaret,  dau.  of  Thomas  Eaton,  of  Eatontown.  He 
was  a  merchant,  highly  esteemed:  Trustee  of  Princeton  College,  1763 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  2OQ 

whole  election.  After  the  pole  was  closed  in  favour  of 
the  above  gentlemen,  Mr.  Fisher,  addressed  himself  to  the 
people  in  the  following  words. 

Dear  Friends,  and  Gentlemen  Voters. 

PRESS'D  with  a  due  sense  of  gratitude,  for  the  repeated 
and  distinguishing  marks  of  your  sincere  respect  for  my 
person;  the  honours  you  have  conferred  on  me  are  very 
obliging;  trusting  your  delicate  and  most  tended  concerns 
again  into  my  hands,  is  really  affecting;  by  this  you  not 
only  approve  of  my  former,  but  pledge  your  honour  to  my 
future  conduct.  I  am  at  a  loss  for  words  on  this  renewed 
occasion,  to  express  the  grateful  sentiments  of  my  enlarged 
mind;  I  must  therefore  content  myself,  returning  you  my 
humble,  my  most  hearty  thanks,  and  refer  the  proof  of  my 
sincerity  and  this  assertion,  to  my  future  actions.  Permit 
me,  nevertheless,  at  this  time  to  congratulate  you  on  the 
promising  appearance  of  your  numerous  and  tender  off- 
spring, treading  in  the  patriot  steps  of  you  their  aged 
parents,  a  prospect  the  more  agreeable,  as  patriotism  in 
many  places,  at  this  time,  is  become  a  martyr;  very. sensible 
I  am  of  my  inferior  abilities  to  many  in  this  county,  but 
as  to  real  satisfaction  and  sincere  delight  in  promoting 
your  best  interest,  and  preserving  your  civil  and  religious 
rights,  I  except  none. 

Having  spent  a  considerable  part  of  the  appointed  num- 
ber of  my  days,  in  the  public  service,  and  am  now  arrived 
to  that  period,  which  would  have  made  it  very  agreeable 
to  have  spent  the  remainder  of  my  moments,  in  a  more 
inactive,  and  a  retired  life.  But  on  considering  the  dis- 
tressed circumstances  of  the  province,  and  the  repeated 

until  his  death;  Justice  of  the  Supreme  Court,  1764  until  his  death: 
member  of  the  Assembly.  1768-1772.  He  d.  April  22,  1772,  and  is  buried 
at  Princeton.  His  son  John  removed  to  Georgia  in  1775,  and  took  an 
active  part  in  the  Revolution.  At  the  close  of  the  War  he  m.  Margaret, 
dau.  of  Capt.  John  Macnherson.  of  Philadelphia;  he  d.  at  Savannah, 
Ga..  in  1815.  His  son,  John  Macpherson  Berrien.  b.  at  Rocky  Hill.  Aug. 
23.  1781.  \vas  a  Judge  of  the  Georgia  State  Courts  ten  years;  U.  S.  Sen- 
ator 1 8^5-1829  U.  S.  Attorney  General,  1829-31.  and  again  U.  S.  Sen- 
ator. 1840-1852.  Washington  wrote  his  farewell  to  his  army  at  the 
Berrien  homestead  at  Rocky  Hill. 

14 


210  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

solicitations  of  my  friends,  I  have  consented  once  more  to 
stand  your  candidate,  which,  however,  in  all  probability 
will  be  my  last.  God  grant,  that  it  may  be  for  your  inter- 
est, and  his  glory;  and,  which  will  be  the  sufficient  reward 
of 

Your  very  obliged,  and 

most  humble  Servant, 

HENDRICK  FISHER. 

Which  address,  the  people  very  thankfully  accepted.  In 
testimony  whereof,  gave  three  huzza's.  After  which  Mr. 
Berrien  gave  a  handsome  treat  to  those  that  were  willing 
to  accept  of  it. 

N.  B.  It  appears  by  the  poll  taken  at  this  election,  the 
freeholders  in  the  county  of  Somerset,  are  increased  to 
more  than  double  the  number  since  the  first  electing  of 
Mr.  Fisher,  in  the  year  1739. — The  New  York  Gazette  or 
Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1331,  July  4,  1768. 

We  have  the  Pleasure  to  inform  our  Readers,  that  the 
House  of  Representatives  in  the  present  Session  of  the 
General  Assembly,  have  received  very  agreeable  Letters 
from  divers  Houses  of  Representatives,  &c.  of  the  other 
Colonies,  in  Answer  to  the  circular  Letter  of  the  late  House 
of  nth  of  Feb.  last.  Whatever  the  Opinion  of  some  on 
the  other  Side  the  Water  may  be,  of  this  Letter,  ivho  have 
had  representations  of  it  as  being  the  rash  and  hasty  Pro- 
duction of  a  Spirit  of  Faction,  it  seems  that  one  respectable 
Body  after  another  in  America  have  judged  it  zvorthy  of 
their  Attention.  The  little  dirty  expiring  Faction,  as  the 
well  known  true  Patriot  and  his  few  Adherents  have  af- 
fected to  call  it,  will,  without  all  Per  adventure,  appear  to 
his  and  their  Astonishment  and  Grief,  to  be  the  sober  and 
enlightened  Sentiments  of  by  far  the  greater  Part  of  the 
most  respectable  Inhabitants,  not  of  Massachusetts-Bay 
only,  but  the  whole  American  Continent! 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  211 

Colony  of  New-Jersey,  May  9,  1768. 

SIR, 

As  soon  as  the  House  of  Representatives  of  this  Colony 
met,  which  was  on  the  I2th  of  April,  I  laid  your  Letter  of 
the  nth  of  February  before  them. 

Sensible  that  the  law  you  complain  of,  is  a  subject  in 
which  every  Colony  is  interested,  the  House  of  Represen- 
tatives readily  perceived  the  necessity  of  an  immediate 
application  to  the  King,  and  that  it  should  correspond  with 
those  of  the  other  Colonies;  but  as  they  have  not  had  an 
opportunity  of  knowing  the  sentiments  of  any  other  Col- 
ony, but  that  of  the  Massachusetts-Bay,  they  have  endeav- 
oured to  conform  themselves  to  the  mode  adopted  by  you. 

They  have  therefore  given  instructions  to  their  Agent, 
and  enjoined  his  attention  to  the  subject  of  their  Petition. 

The  freedom  with  which  the  House  of  Representatives 
of  the  Massachusetts-Bay  have  communicated  their  senti- 
ments upon  a  matter  of  so  great  concern  to  all  the  Colonies, 
hath  been  received  by  this  House,  with  that  Candour,  the 
spirit  and  design  of  your  letter  merit.  And  at  the  same 
time,  that  they  acknowledge  themselves  obliged  to  you  for 
communicating  your  sentiments  to  them,  they  have  di- 
rected me  to  assure  you,  that  they  are  desirous  to  keep  up 
a  correspondence  with  you,  and  to  unite  with  the  Colonies, 
if  necessary,  in  further  supplications  to  his  Majesty,  to 
relieve  his  distressed,  American  subjects. 

In  the  name  and  by  order  of  the  House  of 

Representatives,  I  am,  Sir,  your  most 
Obedient  humble  servant, 

CORTLAND  SKINNER. 

New- Jersey  j  BY  Order  of  the  Hon.  John  Anderson, 
Monmouth,  )  and  James  Lawrence,  Esq;  two  of  the 
judges  of  the  Inferior  Court  of  Common  Pleas  for  said 
County:  Whereas  Ezekiel  Ellison,  Andrew  Pearce,  and 


212  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Gersham  Bullman,  Prisoners  for  Debt,  in  the  Gaol  of  said 
County,  did  on  the  28th  Day  of  June,  1768,  make  Appli- 
cation to  said  Judges,  for  the  Benefit  of  the  late  Insolvent 
Act,  entitled,  "An  Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors, 
made  in  the  eighth  Year  of  his  present  Majesty's  Reign, 
for  said  Purpose,"  having  qualified  and  filed  their  Sched- 
ules. Now  these  are  to  give  Notice  to  the  Creditors  of 
the  said  Debtors,  that  they  be  together  at  said  Gaol  afore- 
said, on  the  26th  Day  of  July  next,  at  ten  of  the  Clock,  to 
shew  cause  (if  any  they  have)  why  the  said  Prisoners 
Estates,  should  not  be  assigned,  and  their  Bodies  dis- 
charged from  their  Confinement,  pursuant  to  said  Act.— 
The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser.  No.  1331, 
July  7,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  July  7. 

We  hear  from  Penn's  Neck,  in  Salem  County,  New- 
Jersey,  that  the  Hail  Storm,  mentioned  in  our  two  last 
Papers,  did  considerable  Damage  to  several  Plantations 
there,  in  three  or  four  of  which,  it  is  said,  the  Grain  is  in- 
tirely  destroyed. 

The  following  Gentlemen  are  elected  Representatives 
in  the  New  Jersey  Assembly,  for  the  under-mentioned 
Counties,  viz.  Salem,  ISAAC  SHARPE,  Esquire. 

Cumberland,  EBENEZER  MILLER,  Esquire. 

Cape-May,  AARON  LEAMING,  and  NICHOLAS  STILL- 
WELL,  Esquires. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2063, 
July  7,  1768. 

RUN  away  on  the  ist  Instant,  from  John  Roberts,  of 
Manington  township,  Salem  county,  West-Jersey,  an  Irish 
servant  man,  named  RICHARD  HANLEY,  about  19  years 
of  age,  a  short  chunkey  fellow,  stoops  as  he  walks,  with 
fair  hair,  lately  trimmed,  of  a  fair  complexion,  speaks  bad 
English,  is  left  handed,  and  when  he  looks  in  a  man's  face, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 

closes  one  of  his  eyes :  had  on,  when  he  went  away,  an 
old  lightish  coloured  cloth  jacket,  a  blue  one  under  it, 
without  sleeves,  an  old  beaver  hat,  a  black  Handkerchief, 
two  coarse  shirts,  two  Pair  of  trousers,  and  shoes,  with 
brass  buckles.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  ser- 
vant, so  as  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
THREE  POUNDS  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 
me 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2063,  July  7,  1768. 

The  AMERICAN  WHIG.    [No.  XIII. ] 

To,  the  Author  of  the  AMERICAN  WHIG. 

SIR, 

I  THANK  you  for  the  publication  of  my  former  letter, 
signed  an  AMERICAN  CHURCHMAN,  and  as  I  now  renew 
the  correspondence  with  the  same  design  of  vindicating 
our  church  from  the  odious  imputation  of  a  design  to  in- 
troduce Bishops  into  America,  you  have  leave  to  make  the 
same  use  of  it 

From  the  best  information  I  have  been  able  to  maintain, 
the  clergy  of  Maryland,  Virginia,  North-Carolina,  South- 
Carolina,  Georgia,  and  the  West-India  islands,  had  no 
concern  in  the  late  petitions  transmitted  on  this  subject; 
they  seem  to  have  been  hatched  by  a  few  warm  mission- 
aries in  the  provinces  of  N civ-Jersey,  New-York  and 
Pennsylvania;  and  propagated  to  the  Eastern  colonies  by 
the  help  of  the  frequent  unconstitutional  assemblies,  lat- 
terly convoked  under  the  name  of  the  Convention 

[signed]    An  AMERICAN  CHURCHMAN. 
— Supplement  to  the  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1335, 
July  7,  1768. 

'On  the  1 3th  Inst.  was  happily  married,  in  St.  Mary's 
Church,  Burlington,  The  Reverend  Mr.  FRAZER/  of  Am- 

iThe  Rev.  William  Frazer  took  charge,  in  1768,  of  St.  Thomas'  church, 
at  Kingwoocl,  and  St.  Andrew's  church,  of  Amwell.  and  a  third  at 
Mosconetcong,  twenty-eight  miles  north  of  Kingwood.  He  labored  in 


214  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

well,  to  Miss  REBECCA  CAMPBELL,  Daughter  of  the  late 
Mr.  CAMPBELL,  Minister.of  the  Church  in  Burlington.'- 
The  Pennnsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  79,  July  11-18,  1768. 

To  the  PUBLIC. 
The  following  is  a  new  Plan  for  a  STAGE  WAGGON,  from 

Powlas-Hook,  proposed  by  the  Subscribers,  viz. 
A  Waggon  to  set  off  every  day  in  the  week,  (Sundays 
excepted)  one  from  Powlas-Hook,  and  another  from  Mr. 
James  Banks's,  at  Newark,  precisely  at  half  an  hour  past 
7  o'clock  in  the  morning,  and  at  half  an  hour  past  4  in  the 
evening;  meet  at  Capt.  Brown's  ferry,  and  exchange  pas- 
sengers; and  every  Monday,  Wednesday  and  Saturday, 
Ward's  waggon  returns  immediately  from  the  said  Ferry, 
through  Newark,  to  Elizabeth-Town;  stays  there  till  3 
o'Clock  in  the  afternoon,  and  then  returns  back  again 
through  Newark,  for  Powlas-Hook.  Passengers  from 
Banks's,  will  be  always  on  a  sure  footing  on  the  Elizabeth- 
Town  days,  as  well  at  at  other  times,  for  if  the  waggon 
should  be  full  from  Elizabeth-Town,  for  New- York, 
Ward  will  have  other  waggons  ready  at  Banks's,  for  the 
passengers  who  wait  there  at  the  appointed  times. 

All  persons  who  are  pleased  to  encourage  this  under- 
taking, are  desir'd  to  be  punctual  to  the  times  above  men- 
tioned, as  the  waggons  must  be  very  exact  in  meeting  at 
Capt.  Brown's  Ferry;  and  they  may  depend  (God  will- 
ing) on  constant  attendance,  and  good  usage, 

By  their  Humble  Servants, 

MATHIAS  WARD,  and 
JOHN  THOMPSON. 

Fare  for  passengers  from  Powlas-Hook,  to  Newark, 
is.  6d.  from  Newark,  to  Elizabeth-Town,  is.  To  begin 

these  several  charges  until  the  breaking  out  of  the  Revolution.  "Being 
supported  by  a  British  Missionary  Society,  he  would  not  omit  the 
T,rayers  for  the  royal  family.  This  rendered  him  obnoxious  to  the 
patriots.  One  Sunday,  when  he  entered  his  church,  a  rope  was  hanging 
over  the  pulpit.  Public  sentiment  grew  so  violent  that  he  was  com- 
pelled to  suspend  worship  in  his  church.  But  so  prudent  was  his  con- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  21$ 

(if  God  permit)  on  Friday  the  I5th  inst. — The  New  York 
Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  871,  July  li,  1768. 

Perth-Amboy,  June  20,  1768. 
To  BE  SOLD, 

By  the  Devisees  of  the  late  ANDREW  JOHNSTON,, 
A  LOT  of  Land,  late  the  Property  of  John  Bissett,  con- 
taining about  500  Acres,  lying  at  the  Head  of  the  Naviga- 
tion on  South  River :  On  which  there  is  a  House,  Store- 
House,  and  Wharf,  being  the  best,  and  has  long  been  the 
most  noted  Landing,  on  that  River;  and  lays  must  con- 
venient for  the  Exportation  of  the  Produce  from  Cran- 
berry, Allen  Town,  and  Crosswicks;  the  Land  is  chiefly 
in  Wood.  Also  a  large  ten  Cord  Boat,  in  good  Repair, 
now  laying  at  Anchor  at  Perth- Amboy.  Any  Person  in- 
clining to  Purchase,  may  apply  to  JOHN  BARBERIE,  JOHN 
JOHNSTON,  STEPHEN  SKINNER,  or  STEPHEN  JOHNSTON, 
who  will  give  a  good  Title,  and  easy  Payments. — The 
Neiv  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1332,  July 
n,  1768. 

RUN  away  on  Thursday  last,  the  7th  Instant,  from  the 
Subscriber  in  Hides-Town,1  New- Jersey,  an  indented  Ser- 
vant Man,  Robert  M'Cormack,  about  5  Feet  10  Inches 
high,  about  25  Years  of  Age,  has  black  Hair,  and  a  down 
look;  had  on  and  took  with  him,  an  old  red  Duffle  Great 
Coat,  one  Tow  and  one  Check  Flannel  Shirt,  i  Pair  of 
Oznaburg  Trousers,  one  Pair  of  old  Shoes,  and  a  felt  Hat. 

Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  Servant,  giving 
proper  Notice,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings  Reward  and  all 
reasonable  Charges  all  Master's  of  Vessels  and  others,  are 

i  Hightstown. 

duct  and  so  lovelv  his  character,  that  soon  after  peace  was  declared 
he  reopened  his  church  and  resumed  his  ministry,  with  general  ac- 
ceptance." He  died  in  1795.  aged  52  years.  He  m.,  July  13,  1768,  Re- 
becca (bap.  March.  1750).  dau.  of  the  Rev.  Colin  Campbell,  missionary 
In  St.  Mary's  church.  Burlington,  and  Mary  Martha  Bard  his  wife 
Ls-nie:  1.  Colin,  b.  Mav  24,  1769;  2.  Elizabeth,  d.  Aug.  21,  1774,  aged 
three  months;  and  perhaps  others. 


2l6  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

warned  not  to  carry  off  harbour,  or  conceal  the  said  Ser- 
vant as  they  would  avoid  a  Prosecution. 

ROBERT  PEARSON. 

New-Jersey,  i  IN  Pursuance  of  an  Order  made  by 
Morris  County,  )  *'  Jacob  Ford  and  Daniel  Cooper, 
senior  Esqrs.  two  of  the  Judges  of  the  Inferior  Court  of 
Common  Pleas,  in  and  for  the  County  of  Morris  afore- 
said, in  East  New-Jersey;  upon  the  Petition  of  William 
Hayden,  an  insolvent  Debtor,  now  in  actual  Custody  in 
said  County:  Notice  is  hereby  given  by  the  said  Peti- 
tioner, to  all  the  Creditors  of  the  said  Petitioner  (to  shew 
Cause  if  any  they  have)  before  the  said  Judges,  or  two 
or  more  Judges  of  said  Court,  at  Morris-Town,  in  the 
County  of  Morris  aforesaid,  on  Monday  the  eighth  Day 
of  August  next,  at  ten  of  the  Clock  in  the  Forenoon  of 
the  same  Day,  being  the  Time  and  Place  appointed  by  the 
said  Judges,  why  an  Assignment  of  the  said  Petitioner's 
Estate  should  not  be  made  to  Persons  then  and  there  to 
be  appointed  by  the  said  Judges;  and  the  said  Petitioner 
be  thereon  discharged  according  to  an  Act  of  the  Gover- 
nor, Council  and  General  Assembly  of  the  Province  of 
New- Jersey  aforesaid,  made  and  passed  at  Perth-Amboy 
in  the  eighth  Year  of  his  present  Majesty's  Reign  entitled, 
"An  Act  for  the  Relief  of  insolvent  Debtors." — The  New 
York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1332,  July  14, 
1768. 

PHILADELPHIA.  July  14.  Captain  Kent,  arrived  here 
from  Falmouth,  on  the  I2th  ult;  -  -  -  on  the  3Oth,  40 
Leagues  E.  S.  E.  from  Sandy-Hook,  he  spoke  the  Brig 
Havanna,  Captain  Nicholson,  from  New  York  for  Liver- 
pool, all  well. 

To  be  sold,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  on  Saturday,  the 
3Oth  of  this  instant  July,  by  the  subscriber,  living  on  the 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  21/ 

premises,  a  valuable  plantation,  situate  in  Water  ford  town- 
ship, Gloucester  county,  West  New-Jersey,  partly  oppo- 
site the  upper  end  of  the  city  of  Philadelphia,  about  5 
miles  from  either  of  Cooper's  ferries,  and  I  mile  from  the 
best  landing  on  Cooper's  creek,  containing  171  acres  and 
a  half  of  land  by  deed;  there  are  on  the  said  premises,  a 
good  2  story  brick  house,  a  2  story  brick  kitchen  adjoin- 
ing, with  2  fire-places  in  each,  with  a  stone  cellar  under 
the  said  house,  petitioned  off  into  3  parts,  a  good  brick 
smoak  house.,  a  brick  well,  with  extraordinary  good  water. 
a  large  garden,  well  paled  in,  fronting  the  said  buildings, 
and  one  of  the  best  framed  barns  in  the  said  province,  with 
different  stables,  cow  houses,  chair  house,  &c.  all  partly 
new;  a  good  young  apple  orchard,  and  peach  orchard; 
about  70  or  80  acres  of  cleared  land,  12  or  14  acres  of  good 
clover  and  green-grass  inland  meadow,  and  a  considerable 
quantity  more  may  be  made,  the  whole  land  is  very  natu- 
ral to  clover,  both  white  and  red,  the  wood-land  is  very 
well  timbered,  without  any  pine.  It  would  be  proper  for 
any  person,  who  inclines  to  purchase,  to  take  a  view  of 
the  said  plantation  and  buildings  before  the  day  appointed. 
The  sale  to  begin  at  one  o'clock;  where  due  attendance  will 
be  given,  and  the  conditions  made  known,  by 

BARNABAS  CROWELL. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.   2064,   July   14, 
1768. 

Yesterday  arrived  here  the  Brig  Jenny,  Capt.  Young, 
from  Lure  in  Jamaica :  On  his  passage  he  spoke  with  the 
following  vessels;  ....  and  on  the  Qth,  50  leagues 
E.  S.  E.  of  our  Capes  with  the  Schooner  George,  Capt. 
Allen,  from  this  port  for  the  Granades,  all  well  on  board 
both  vessels. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1336,  July 
14,  1768- 


2l8  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Philadelphia,  June  30.     College  of  Philadelphia, 

June  21,  1768. 

This  day,  which  may  be  considered  as  having  given 
birth  to  Medical  Honours  in  America,  the  following  gen- 
tlemen were  admitted  to  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Phys- 
ick;  viz  Messrs Jonathan  Elmer  of  West- 
Jersey,  ....  John  Lawrence  of  East- Jersey 

Agreeable  to  the  rules  of  the  college,  these  gentlemen 
previous  to  their  admission  to  a  degree,  had  diligently  at- 
tended the  lectures  of  the  several  professors  in  Anatomy, 
the  Matcriae  Mcdica,  Chymistry,  Theory  and  Practice 
of  Physic,  and  the  Clinical  Lectures  in  the  Pennsylvania 
Hospital,  in  which,  (as  well  as  in  the  Languages  and  the 
necessary  branches  of  Natural  Philosophy)  they  gave  the 
most  satisfactory  proofs  of  their  proficiency,  both  in  their 
private  and  public  examinations. — Supplement  to  the  New 
York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  13^2.  July  16, 
1768. 

A  Plantation  to  be  sold  in  Newark  Town,  on  the  great 
Post  Road,  near  the  Center  of  said  Town;  it  contains 
about  60  Acres  of  exceeding  good  Upland  and  Meadow, 
that  will  produce  yearly  50  Loads  of  English  fresh  and  salt 
Hay,  eight  Acres  of  good  Orchard  of  best  grafted  Fruits. 
Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase  the  same,  by  applying 
to  JOHN  TREAT  CRANE,  will  be  waited  upon,  shewn  the 
Premises,  and  know  the  Conditions  of  Sale. 

Newark,  July  13,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
872,  July  1 8,  1768. 

To  be  SOLD  by  Jonathan  Hampton,  of  Elisabeth-Town,  in 
New- Jersey,  the  following  Tracts  of  Land  in  said  Prov- 
ince, viz. 
Two  Thousand  Acres  in  Newtown,  in  the  County  of 

Sussex,  on  which  Tract   stands  the  new   Stone  Court- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  219 

House,  around  which  is  a  new  Town  regularly  laid  out, 
and  already  began  to  be  built,  being  about  50  Miles  N.  W. 
from  Elizabeth-Town.  The  Land  is  good  as  any  in  those 
Parts,  and  well  timbered  and  watered;  having  exceeding 
fine  Swamps  and  Meadow;  plenty  of  good  Lime  Stone, 
which  hammers  well  for  building,  and  good  Sand,  both 
within  a  Mile  of  said  Town. 

Five  Thousand  Acres  in  Hardzvick  and  Knolton,  in  said 
County,  on  both  Sides  Pazvlins-Kill;  a  very  fine  Land  and 
Swamps,  and  well  timbered,  with  good  Conveniencies  for 
Water  Works,  of  any  Kind,  on  the  Falls  of  said  Kill,  hav- 
ing already  Twenty-two  Farms  upon  it;  each  Farm  hav- 
ing a  Quantity  of  Meadow,  and  TOO  Apple  Trees,  and  oth- 
er Fruit  Trees  already  planted :  Lumber  or  Iron  may  be 
carried  from  this  Tract,  by  Water,  to  Philadelphia;  as 
many  Thousands  of  Lumber  has  already  been  transported, 
from  said  Falls,  that  Way. 

Three  Hundred  Acres  on  said  Pawlins-Kill,  about  three 
Miles  from  said  Court-House,  some  fine  interval  Land; 
the  Upland  good,  and  well  timbered. 

Seven  Hundred  and  Fifty  Acres  in  Mendom,  Morris 
County,  having  three  Improvements  on  it.  The  Land  is 
good,  but  Stony,  and  full  of  Timber;  joins  to  Lands  of 
Robert  Young,  and  James  Losey. 

Five  Hundred  and  Sixty  Acres  of  excellent  fine  Swamp, 
and  Upland,  as  good  as  any  in  Jersey,  in  Morris  Town, 
joining  the  Seat  of  the  Right  Hon.  the  Earl  of  Sterling, 
about  ten  Miles  West  from  Elizabtth-Tozvn;  capable  of 
very  great  improvements. 

Five  Hundred  Acres  of  Marsh  in  Salem,  joining  Del- 
aware River,  'Stow-Creck,  and  Muddy-Run.  Enquire 
about  this  Tract  of  Ebeneser  Miller,  Esq;  of  Cumberland 
County. 

One  Thousand  Acres  at  Great  Egg-Harbour,  Meadow 
and  Swamps.  Enquire  of  Mr.  George  May  near  the  same. 


220  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Any  Person  inclining  to  purchase  any  of  these  Tracts, 
or  any  Part  thereof,  may  enquire  of  the  above  Persons, 
or  of  the  Subscriber,  who  will  give  an  indisputable  Title 
for  the  same;  and  on  receiving  one  sixth  Part  of  the 
Money,  or  Security  for  the  same,  in  a  short  Time,  will  give 
three,  four,  or  six  Years  for  the  remainder,  on  having  the 
Interest  Yearly  paid;  only  for  the  Lands  at  Salem  and 
Egg-Harbour  he  will  expect  the  whole  of  the  Money  in 
Six  Months,  or  a  Year,  at  farthest.1 

JONATHAN  HAMPTON. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
!333>  July  18,  1768. 

Salem  County,  Alloways  Creek,  June  30,  1768. 
RAN  away  last  night  from  the  Subscriber,  one  THOMAS 
ROBINSON,  an  Irishman;  he  is  about  twenty-three  years 
old,  and  five  feet  five  inches  high,  has  brown  hair,  is  well 
set,  and  talks  tolerable  good  English.  It  is  about  three 
years  since  he  left  his  native  country.  He  had  on,  when 
he  went  away,  a  blue  coat,  green  plush  jacket,  a  pair  of 
striped  Holland  trowsers. — He  took  with  him  a  large 
dark  roan  horse,  with  no  white  marks  about  him;  he  is 
about  fifteen  hands  high,  and  paces  and  trots.  Whoever 
takes  up  said  Runaway  and  Horse  shall  have  FIVE  POUNDS 
Reward,  and  for  the  Horse  only,  FIFTY  SHILLINGS,  and 
all  reasonable  charges  paid  by 

WILLIAM  CRAIG. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle.  No.  80,  July  18-25, 
1768. 

New-York,  July  21.  We  hear  from  Newark,  that  on 
Monday  Night  last,  Schuyler's  Copper  Works,  at  Second 
River,  which  were  burnt  about  7  Years  ago,  were  again 
destroyed  by  Fire,  supposed  to  be  by  Design,  as  it  was  not 
known  that  any  Fire  had  been  lately  used  there. 

iSee  pages  14-16.  ante. 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  221 

A  LIST  of  LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post-Office,  Phila- 
delphia. 

B.     Samuel  Blackwood,  Woodbury,  N.  Jersey. 

G.     Arthur  Gordon,  Cumberland  County. 

H.     James  Hinchman,  Gloucester  County. 

M.     James  Millar,  West  Jersey. 

R.     Richard  Renshaw,  Gloucester  Point. 

S.     Nicholas  Stihvell,  Upper  End  of  Cape  May. 


VIEW  OF 

HOUSE 

AND 

FARM. 


To  BE  SOLD, 

BY  Public  Vendue,  on  the  i8th  Day 
of  August  next,  at  three  o' Clock  in  the 
Afternoon,  at  the  House  of  John  Bol- 
lins,  in  Pennytown,  in  West  New-Jer- 
sey; A  certain  Plantation,  containing 


about  200  Acres  of  Land,  one  half 
whereof  is  cleared  and  20  Acres  is  good  mowable  Meadow, 
and  as  much  more  may  be  made :  The  Upland  is  very  fer- 
tile, and  the  whole  under  good  Fence,  there  are  two  Tene- 
ments on  the  Place.  The  first  has  a  Dwelling-House,  part- 
ly framed  and  partly  built  of  Stone,  of  the  Dimensions  of 
26  Feet  by  42,  with  a  Piazza.  A  new  built  frame  Barn,  of 
22  Feet  by  30,  a  large  Orchard  of  5  or  600  Apple  Trees, 
this  Part  is  in  the  Tenure  of  Philip  Peters,  at  the  yearly 
Rent  of  £.  40  and  the  other  Part  is  in  the  Tenure  of  James 
Yates,  at  £.  6  per  Annum.  The  unimproved  is  well  tim- 
bered, with  Hickory,  black  and  white  Oak,  &c.  The  Place 
is  12  Miles  from  Trenton  and  18  from  Brunswick,  about 
a  Quarter  of  a  Mile  from  the  great  Road  between  the  said 
Towns,  and  very  near  to  several  Grist  Mills  and  Places  of 
Worship.  One  half  of  the  purchase  Money  to  be  paid 
in  three  Months  after  Sale,  when  a  good  Title  will  be 
made  for  the  Residue;  the  Purchaser  may  have  a  Year's 
Credit,  on  paying  Interest  and  giving  Security.  Atten- 


222  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

dance  will  be  given  at  the  Time  and  Place  aforesaid,  by 
JOHN  JONES, 
JOSEPH  POTTS, 

Feoffees  in  Trust  for  the  Use  of 
the  Creditors  of  Nehemiah  Stoute. 
— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1333.  July  21,  1768. 

NEW- YORK,  July  18 
To  the  PRINTER. 

Your  inserting  the  following  humble  petition  of  the 
House  OF  REPRESENTATIVES  of  New-Jersey,  to  our  most 
gracious  Sovereign,  extracted  from  the  votes  of  that 
House  of  the  *jth  of  May  last,  will  shew  the  sense  thai 
people  hove  of  the  late  acts  of  parliament;  and  is  said  to 
be  in  consequence  of  the  Circular  Letter  from  the  Assem- 
bly of  the  Massachusetts-Bay. 

Most  Gracious  Sovereign, 

"We  Your  Majesty's  loyal  subjects,  the  Representa- 
tives of  Your  colony  of  New- Jersey,  confiding  in  Your 
Majesty's  paternal  affection  for  Your  people,  humbly  im- 
plore permission  to  approach  the  throne,  and  to  present 
our  supplications  in  Behalf  of  our  ourselves  and  our  con- 
stituents, Your  Majesty's  faithful  and  afflicted  subjects. 

"Before  that  happy  period,  in  which  the  empire  of  the 
British  dominion  was,  by  the  favour  of  divine  Providence, 
for  the  Felicity  of  those  Domininions,  and  of  Europe  in 
general,  established  in  your  illustrious  House;  our  Ances- 
tors, with  the  Consent  of  the  Crown,  removed  from  their 
native  Land,  then  abounding  in  all  Blessings,  but  that 
perfect  Security  of  Liberty,  and  that  merciful  Spirit  of 
Administration,  which  render  your  Royal  Family  so  justly 
dear  to  your  remotest  Subjects;  and  ventured  with  their 
helpless  Relatives,  through  a  vast  Ocean,  and  trusted 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRAC1S.  223 

themselves  with  their  tender  Companions  to  the  inhospit- 
able and  unknown  Wilderness  of  this  new  World;  the 
Horrors  of  which  no  Consideration  could  render  tolerable, 
but  the  Prospect  of  enjoying  here  that  compleat  Freedom, 
which  Britons  never  thought  could  be  purchased  at  too 
great  a  Price. 

The  Subjects  thus  emigrating,  brought  with  them,  as 
inherent  in  their  Persons,  all  the  Rights  and  Liberties  of 
natural-born  Subjects  within  the  Parent  State :  In  Conse- 
quence of  these,  a  Government  was  formed,  under  which 
they  have  been  constantly  exercised  and  enjoyed  by  the 
Inhabitants,  and  repeatedly  and  solemnly  recognized  and 
confirmed  by  your  Royal  Predecessors,  and  the  Legisla- 
ture of  Great-Britain. 

One  of  these  Rights  and  Liberties,  vested  in  the  People 
of  this  Colony,  is  the  Privilege  of  being  exempt  from  any 
Taxations,  but  such  as  is  imposed  on  them  by  themselves, 
or  by  their  Representatives;  and  this  they  esteem  so  in- 
valuable, that  they  are  fully  persuaded,  no  other  can  exist 
without  it. 

Your  Majesty's  signal  Distinction  is,  that  you  reign 
over  Freemen,  and  your  peculiar  Glory,  that  you  reign  in 
such  a  Manner,  that  your  Subjects,  the  Disposers  of  their 
own  Property,  are  ready  and  willing  whenever  your  Ser- 
vice calls  upon  them,  with  their  Lives  and  Fortunes,  to 
assist  your  Cause.  Your  People  of  this  Colony,  who  share 
in  the  Blessings  flowing  from  your  Wisdom  and  Virtue, 
most  gratefully  sensible  of  their  Obligation  to  so  excel- 
lent a  Prince,  humbly  hope  they  never  have  been  deficient 
in  duly  acknowledging  them ;  Whenever  it  has  been  neces- 
sary that  Supplies  should  be  levied  within  this  Colony; 
Requisitions  by  your  Majesty,  or  by  your  Royal  Predeces- 
sors, conformable  to  the  Rights  and  Liberties  of  this  your 
People,  have  been  made,  and  by  them  loyally  and  liberally 
complied  with. 


224  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

We  beseech  your  Majesty  to  do  them  the  Justice  to  be- 
lieve, that  they  can  never  fail  on  any  future  Occasion,  to 
demonstrate  their  Devotion  to  your  Majesty;  nor  can 
they  resign  without  unutterable  Shame  and  Grief,  the 
Honour  and  Satisfaction  of  voluntarily  and  chearfully 
expressing  in  the  strongest  Manner  their  Circumstances 
will  admit,  their  unfeigned  Affection  for  your  Majesty's 
Person,  their  distinguished  Duty  to  your  Government,  and 
their  inflexible  Resolution  to  maintain  your  authority,  and 
defend  your  Dominions. 

Penetrated  with  these  Sentiments,  this  your  People, 
with  the  utmost  Concern  and  Anxiety,  observe,  that  Du- 
ties have  been  lately  imposed  on  them  by  Parliament,  for 
the  sole  and  express  Purposes  of  raising  a  Revenue :  This 
is  a  Taxation  upon  them,  from  which  they  conceive  they 
ought  to  be  protected,  by  the  acknowledged  Principles  of 
the  Constitution,  that  Freemen  cannot  be  legally  taxed 
but  by  themselves,  or  by  their  Representatives;  and  that 
they  are  represented  in  Parliament,  they  not  only  cannot 
allow,  but  are  convinced,  that  from  their  local  Circum- 
stances they  never  can  be. 

Very  far  is  it  from  our  Intention,  to  deny  our  Subordi- 
nation to  that  august  Body,  or  our  Dependance  on  the 
Kingdom  of  Great-Britain;  in  these  Connections,  and  in 
the  Settlement  of  our  Liberties,  under  the  auspicious  In- 
fluence of  your  Royal  House,  we  know  our  Happiness 
consists ;  and  therefore,  to  confine  those  Connections,  and 
to  strengthen  this  Settlement,  is  at  once  our  Interest,  Duty, 
and  Delight:  Nor  do  we  apprehend,  that  it  lies  within 
our  Power,  by  any  Means  more  effectually  to  promote 
these  great  Purposes,  than  by  zealously  striving  to  pre- 
serve in  perfect  Vigour,  those  sacred  Rights  and  Liberties, 
under  the  inspiriting  Sanction  of  which,  inconceivable 
Difficulties  and  Dangers  opposing,  this  Colony  has  been 
rescued  from  the  rudest  State  of  Nature,  converted  into  a 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  225 

populous,  flourishing,  and  valuable  Territory;  and  has 
contributed  in  a  very  considerable  Degree,  to  the  Welfare 
of  Great  Britain. 

Most  Gracious  Sovereign, 

The  incessant  exertion  of  your  truly  Royal  Cares,  to 
procure  your  People  a  Prosperity  equal  to  your  Love  of 
them,  encourages  us  with  all  Humility  to  pray,  that  your 
Majesty's  Clemency  will  be  graciously  pleased  to  take  into 
Consideration  our  unhappy  Circumstances;  and  to  afford 
us  such  Relief,  as  your  Majesty's  Wisdom  shall  judge  to 
be  most  proper." 

Ordered, 

That  the  Speaker  do  sign  the  said  Petition,  and  transmit 
the  same  to  the  Agent,  to  be  presented  to  His  Majesty. 

RUN  away,  on  the  7th  instant,  from  Robert  Pearson, 
of  Hight's  town,  East  New- Jersey,  an  Irish  servant  man, 
named  ROBERT  CARMACK,  about  25  years  of  age,  5  feet 
10  inches  high,  a  pale  down  looking  man;  had  on.  when 
he  went  away,  an  old  felt  hat,  red  duffield  great  coat,  check 
flannel  shirt,  ozenbrigs  trousers,  and  old  shoes ;  took  with 
him  a  homespun  tow  shirt.  It  is  supposed  he  will  en- 
deavour to  get  on  board  some  vessel  in  this  port.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his  master 
may  have  him  again,  shall  have  FORTY  SHILLINGS  reward, 
and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by  me  • 

ROBERT  PEARSON,  or 

WILLIAM  FfsHBURN,  Merchant  in  Phila. 
— The  Pennsylvania   Gazette,  No.   2065,   ^u^  2I> 
1768. 

Messieurs  WILLIAM  and  THOMAS  BRADFORD, 
//  you  will  please  to  give  the  following  piece,  a  place  in 
your  next  paper,  you  ivill  doubtless  gratify  many  of 
your  readers,  and  at  the  same  time,  perform  an  office  of 

15 


226  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

justice  to  the  public,  and  to  the  character  of  a  body  of 
men  very  grosly  misrepresented,  and  aspersed  by  an- 
anonymous  letter,  published  in  the  Chronicle,  No.  76. 
It  has  been  an  old  saying,  "cast  dirt  plentifully  and 
some  of  it  will  stick."     Fully  of  this  sentiment  it  seems 

was  the  Author  of  that  letter,  signed  B.  O 

But  he  has  something  to  say  respecting  the  College  of 
New-Jersey,  as  well  as  the  Synod.  In  his  historical  nar- 
ration, he  evidently  designs  to  represent  the  board  of  trus- 
tees in  an  injurious  light.  I  shall  leave  that  respectable 
body  to  speak  for  themselves,  although  it  is  probable  they 
will  judge  such  ill-natured  sneers  unworthy  of  their  no- 
tice, whether  their  act  of  admitting  none  into  the  college 
save  the  first  class,  be  in  fact  a  prudent  regulation  or  not 
may  be  dubious;  doubtless  they  thought  it  to  be  proper 
at  the  time  of  passing  it,  although  I  know  some  not  in- 
considerable friends  of  that  institution,  who  think  other- 
wise. Some  future  period  will  better  discover  the  truth 
in  that  point. 

But  that  which  I  would  remark  upon,  is  something  that 
is  evidently  calculated  to  reflect  dishonour  both  upon  the 
Synod  and  College;  touching  all  which  I  shall  observe 
that  the  want  of  a  professor  of  divinity,  has  been  judged 
by  many  as  a  great  and  by  some  as  a  principal  defect  in 
that  institution.  Many  of  the  members  of  the  Synod  have 
frequently  expressed  their  desire  of  having  such  a  pro- 
fessor introduced,  and  declare  themselves  ready  to  assist 
in  supporting  him.  The  trustees  in  compliance  with  those 
desires  of  the  friends  of  the  College,  have  called  one  to 
that  station ;  but  as  their  funds  were  not  sufficient  for  this 
and  other  necessary  purposes  of  this  institution,  they  re- 
spectfully applied  to  the  Synod  for  their  assistance  in  this 
affair,  as  they  justly  supposed  they  had  good  reason  to  ex- 
pect it  from  them.  The  Synod  judged  they  could  not  with 
propriety  apply  any  part  of  the  money  now  in  their  hands 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  22 / 

for  this  purpose,  it  being  expressly  designed  by  the  donors, 
for  other  uses,  as  beforementioned,  but  at  the  same  time 
agreed  to  lay  the  affair  before  their  congregations  this 
year,  and  recommend  it  to  their  beneficence  being  desirous 
that  what  they  shall  do  for  this  purpose,  may  be  a  matter 
of  generosity,  and  not  of  necessity:  But  considering  that 
they  had  more  in  their  hands  than  would  be  expended  the 
currant  year,  they  further  agreed  to  lend  to  the  trustees 
of  the  college  for  the  use  of  the  Professor,  the  sum  of  fifty 
pounds,  to  be  nevertheless  refunded  out  of  what  may  be 
given  expressly  for  this  purpose. 

The  letter  writer  goes  on  in  these  words  "for  it  is 
judged  that  what  he  has  for  being  Professor  and  President 
"both  are  not  sufficient."  If  he  did  not  know  before,  this 
may  inform  him,  that  the  present  professor  hath  not  both 
the  offices  mentioned,  the  business  of  the  president  was  not 
put  upon  him,  save  his  proper  share  in  the  government, 
nor  has  he  any  part  of  his  salary;  for  that  this  remark 
might  have  been  decently  spared,  as  well  as  several  others 
concerning  a  certain  reverend  clergyman  and  his  sneers 
about  "gracious,  holy,  humble,  rich  and  pious  poor  youths, 
"&c"  as  to  these,  I  say  no  more,  having  confined  myself  to 
facts  with  which  I  am  well  acquainted  and  which  can 

easily  be  proved  by  forces  if  need  requires 

[signed]     RICHARD  TREAT. 

Abington,  July  qth,  1768. 

— Supplement  to  the  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1337, 
July  21,  1768. 

SEVEN  POUNDS  Reward. 

RAN  away,  the  22d  ult.  from  the  subscriber  living  in 
Gloucester  township,  near  Great  Egg-Harbour,  a  Molatto 
man,  named  Samuel  Wright;  he  was  born  near  Hamp- 
ton, in  Virginia,  is  about  30  years  old,  5  feet  8  inches 
high,  and  well  set,  his  hair  bushy,  and  rather  red,  much 


228  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

mark'd  with  the  small-pox,  has  a  down  look,  and  when 
angry  very  apt  to  turn  up  the  white  of  his  eyes;  one  of 
his  thumbs  greatly  bruised.  He  had  on  an  old  felt  hat, 
an  ozenbrig  shirt,  a  pair  of  tow  trowsers,  and  a  pair  of 
neat's  leather  shoes,  about  half  worn,  with  large  brass 
buckles.  Whoever  secures  said  Run-away,  so  that  the 
owner  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  the  above  reward. 

RICHARD  FRY. 

N.  B.  The  said  fellow  was  whipped  and  pilloried  at 
Philadelphia,  for  horse-stealing  last  summer. 

IT  having  been  reported  very  much  to  the  damage  of 
the  subscriber,  who  lives  on  the  Pennsylvania  side  of  the 
ferry,  on  the  road  from  Philadelphia  to  Burlington,  com- 
monly known  by  the  name  of  Dunks's,  that  the  said  ferry 
is  not  properly  attended,  nor  provided  with  suitable  boats 

He  takes  this  method  to  inform  the  Public,  that  he 

has  boats  (equal,  if  not  superior  to  any  on  the  river  Dela- 
ware,) for  the  conveyance  of  any  sort  of  carriage  that 
travels  the  road,  and  that  he  keeps  an  house  of  entertain- 
ment, where  such  gentlemen,  &c.  who  may  be  pleased  to 
favour  him  with  their  custom,  may  depend  on  his  utmost 
endeavour  to  oblige  them,  and  that  their  passage  over  the 
river  shall  be  expedited  as  much  as  possible,  by  their  hum- 
ble servant 

July  27,  1768.  LEVI  MURREL. 

New-Brunswick,  July  26,  1768. 

ON  July  the  8th,  1768,  was  brought  before  John  Den- 
nis, Esq;  in  the  city  of  New-Brunswick,  and  province  of 
East  New-Jersey,  to  be  examined,  John  Farrel,  who  was 
born  in  Dublin,  came  to  the  city  of  Philadelphia  with  Capt. 
John  Reyley,  was  sold  to  Peter  Kelly,  of  New-Town,  be- 
low New-Castle ;  he  ruri  away  from  said  master  the  latter 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 

part  of  March  last,  is  about  27  years  of  age,  5  feet  8  or  9 
inches  high,  short  black  hair,  long  visage,  a  large  nose, 
flat  on  the  top,  slim  bodied,  but  large  bones;  he  was  com- 
mitted to  the  gaol  of  this  city,  where  he  remains. 

On  July  the  26th  was  also  committed  to  the  gaol  afore- 
said, by  John  Dennis,  Esq;  one  William  Martain,  who 
saith  he  was  born  in  the  suburbs  of  London,  near  Moor- 
fields  ;  came  to  the  port  of  Philadelphia  with  Capt.  James 
Robinson,  was  sold  to,  and  is  still  servant  to  Thomas 
Ives,  of  Charles-Town,  near  to  William  Ives,  at  the  Up- 
per-Ferry over  Schuylkill,  in  Bucks  county,  he  run  away 
from  said  master  on  Friday  the  I5th  instant,  is  28  years 
of  age,  grey  eyes,  small  stature,  but  well  set,  flaxen  curled 
hair,  and  of  a  fair  countenance,  by  trade,  a  paper  stamper. 

The  masters  aforesaid  are  desired  to  send  for  their  ser- 
vants, as  soon  as  possible,  or  proper  methods  will  be  taken 
to  set  them  at  liberty,  by  JOHN  DENNIS,  one  of  the  alder- 
men of  the  city  aforesaid. 

Bordentown,  July  26,  1768. 
To  BE  SOLD, 

A  LOT  of  ground  situate  in  Bordentown,  fronting  the 
two  main  streets,  containing  one  acre ;  on  which  is  erected 
a  commodious  two  story  brick  house,  well  built,  and  com- 
pletely finished,  with  a  good  dry  cellar  under  the  same,  a 
two  story  brick  kitchen,  with  apartments  for  servants,  a 
good  well  at  the  door,  with  a  pump  in  the  same. 

A  good  garden,  a  stable,  chair,  and  hay-house;  the 
dwelling-house  is  pleasantly  situated,  and  commands  an 
agreeable  prospect  of  the  river  Delaware,  and  is  in  every 
respect  calculated  for  a  gentleman's  country  seat. 

Also  will  be  sold,  with  or  without,  as  may  best  suit  the 
purchaser,  130  acres  of  good  land,  three  quarters  of  a  mile 
from  town;  60  acres  are  cleared,  and  in  good  fence,  on 


230  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

which  is  an  orchard  of  fine  grafted  fruit,  about  nine  acres 
of  good  mowing  ground,  the  remainder  partly  wood-land. 
Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the  premises,  may  have 
time  for  paying  the  purchase  money,  with  paying  inter- 
est :  For  particulars  inquire  of  Mr.  STEPHEN  CARMACK, 
merchant  in  Philadelphia,  or  JOHN  IMLAY,  in  Borden- 
town. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  81,  July  25- 
August  i,  1768. 

LIST  of  LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post-Office  of  New- 
York,  July  5,  1768. 

.  .  .  .  Ebenezer  Alliney,  John  Anderson,  2.  Lewis 
Morris  Ashfield,  Esq;  at  Shrewsbury;  ....  Wm. 
'Claughry,  Wm.  Careless,  Shrewsbury;  ....  Cath. 
Dorsett,  Middletown;  ....  Peter  Wilson,  New  Bar- 
badoes,  2. 

ONE  HUNDRED  POUNDS  Reward. 

WHEREAS  the  Treasury  in  Perth- Amboy,  was  last  Night 
broke  open,  and  Seven  Thousand  Pounds  carried  off.  A 
Reward  of  One  Hundred  Pounds  shall  be  paid  to  any  one 
whatever  that  will  detect  or  discover  the  Thief,  by  me 

STEPHEN  SKINNER. 

Perth- Amboy,  July  22,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
873,  July  25,  1768. 

Netv-York,  July  25.  On  Monday  Night  last,  a  very 
costly  and  valuable  Engine  for  extracting  Water  out  of 
Col.  Schuyler's  Copper  Mines  at  Second  River,  unhap- 
pily took  Fire,  and  that,  together  with  the  Buildings 
which  inclosed  it,  entirely  consumed :  This  is  the  second 
Time  the  Fire  has  distroyed  their  Engine,  and  as  it  is  of 
great  Value,  and  many  Labourers  had  their  chief  Depen- 
dence on  this  Work,  which  they  will  now  probably  know 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  23! 

the  want  of;  the  Damage  will  be  very  sensibly  felt :  It  is 
unknown  how  the  Fire  began,  but  it  is  said,  not  to  be 
without  some  suspicion  of  Design. 

Last  Thursday  Night  the  Treasury  at  Amboy,  was 
broke  open  and  robbed. 

Burlington,  July  14,  1768. 

SIR, 

/  herewith  send  you  a  List  of  the  MEMBERS  returned 
for  the  new  Assembly  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey^ 
which  it  may  be  a  Gratification  to  some  of  your  Readers, 
to  find  in  your  Paper.  I  am,  Sir,  &c. 

City  of  BURLINGTON.  *  Abraham  Hewlings,  and  *  Jos- 
eph Smith,  Esqs. 

County  of  Burlington.  *Henry  Paxson,  and  *Joseph 
Bullock,  Esqs. 

Gloucester.  *  Robert  F.  Price,  and  *John  Hinchman, 
Esqs. 

Salem  and  Cumberland.  Ebenezer  Miller,  and  *Isaac 
Sharpe,  Esqs. 

Cape  May.  Aaron  Learning,  and  Nicholas  Stilwell, 
Esqs. 

Hunterdon,  Morris  and  Sussex.  *John  Hart,  and 
*  Samuel  Tucker. 

City  of  PERTH- AM  BOY.  Cortland  Skinner,  and  *John 
L.  Johnson,  Esqs. 

Middlesex.     John  Wether  ill,  and  Reune  Runyan,  Esqs. 

Essex.     John  Ogden,  and  Stephen  Crane,  Esqs. 

Bergen.     Theunis  Dey,  and  * Johannes  Demarest,  Esqs. 

Monmouth.  *Edward  Taylor,  and  *Robert  Harts- 
horne,  Esqs. 

Somerset.  Hendrick  Fisher,  and  The  hon.  John  Ber- 
rien,  Esqs. 

Those  marked  thus  *  are  new  Members. 


232  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

His  EXCELLENCY,  GOVERNOR  FRANKLIN,  has  been 
pleased  to  prorogue  the  Assembly  to  the  26th  of  Septem- 
ber next. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

At  Public  Vendue,  on  Fourth  Day,  the  24th  of  the  8th 
Month,  called  August,  and  to  be  entered  upon  the 
loth  Day  of  the  4th  Month,  called  April. 

A  Valuable  Plantation,  the  Estate  of  Shobal  Smith,  late 
of  Woodbridge,  in  East  New-Jersey,  deceased,  containing 
1 80  Acres,  or  thereabouts,  about  70  Acres  of  which  lyes 
adjoining  to,  and  partly  in,  an  Elbow  of  Woodbridge- 
creek;  which  Creek,  as  far  as  it  joins,  serves  sufficiently 
for  a  Fence.  The  Place  is  well  water'd,  and  has  on  it  a 
Dwelling-House,  and  Out-Houses,  a  good  Barn,  and  a 
very  good  Orchard.  It  consists  of  good  Tillable  and  Pas- 
ture Land;  likewise  good  Fresh  and  Salt  Meadow;  of 
each  an  equal  Proportion,  so  far  as  to  render  it  both  con- 
venient and  profitable.  The  remainder  Part  of  the  said 
Plantation,  lyes  at  about  a  Mile  distance,  upon  the  Road 
that  leads  from  Elizabeth-Town  to  Woodbridge;  con- 
tains no  Acres,  a  Part  of  which  is  well  wooded,  the  rest 
is  good  Tillable  and  Pasture  Land;  it  has  on  it  sundry 
Springs  which  afford  plenty  of  Water,  in  the  dryest  Time. 
And  as  it  is  here  described  separately,  so  it  will  be  sold 
separately  or  together,  as  it  may  best  suit  the  Purchaser 
or  Purchasers.  The  Vendue  to  begin  at  12  o' Clock,  at 
which  Time  and  Place  the  Conditions  will  be  made  known, 
by 

JACOB  FITZ  RANDOLPH, 
WILLIAM  SMITH,  Executors. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1334,  July  25,  1768. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  233 

Philadelphia,  July  24.  Extract  of  a  Letter  from  Am- 
boy,  July  22,  1768. 

"Last  Night  the  Office  of  the  Treasurer  of  the  Eastern 
Division  was  broke  open,  and  a  Quantity  of  Money,  in 
Dollars  and  Paper,  stolen,  to  the  Amount  of  between  Six 
and  Seven  Thousand  Pounds.  The  Money  was  in  an  Iron 
Chest,  in  which  the  Public  Money,  when  cut  from  the 
Sheets  and  signed  by  the  Treasurer,  is  put.  It  appears 
that  the  Villains  first  broke  open  a  Scrutore,  in  which  was 
some  few  Johannes,  and  some  old*  Bills  to  the  Amount  of 
about  Thirty  or  Forty  Pounds,  which  they  took;  in  the 
Scructore  they  found  the  Key  of  the  Chest,  which  was 
drawn  to  the  East  Window,  where  it  was  opened,  and  the 
Money  carried  off."1 — The  New  York  Journal  or  General 
Advertiser,  No.  1334,  July  28,  1768. 

NEW-YORK,  July  21. 

We  hear  from  Newark,  that  on  Monday  Night  last, 
Schuyler's  Copper  Works,  at  Second  River,  which  were 
burnt  about  7  Years  ago,  were  again  destroyed  by  Fire, 
supposed  to  be  by  Design,  as  it  was  not  known  that  any 
Fire  had  been  lately  used  there.2 

PHILADELPHIA,  July  28. 

We  hear  from  New-Jersey,  that  last  Week  died  at 
Sandy-Hook,  JOHN  FRENCH,  Esq;  late  Secretary  to  his 
Excellency  Sir  HENRY  MOORE,  Governor  of  New-York. 

By  His  EXCELLENCY  WILLIAM  FRANKLIN,  Esq;  Cap- 
tain General,  Governor  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  His 


1  For  an  account  of   this   robbery  and  the   ensuing  quarrel   between 
Governor  Franklin  and  the  Assembly,  see  paper  by  William  A.  White- 
head,  in  Proceedings  N.  J.  Historical  Society,  First  Series,  V.,  49. 

2  For  an  account  of  this  concern,   see   "Josiah  Hornblower,   and  the 
First  Steam-Engine   in  America.     With  some  notices   of  the  Schuyler 
Copper  Mines  at  Second  River,  N.  J.,   and  a  Genealogy  of  the  Horn- 
blower  Family,"  by  William  Nelson,   Newark,  N.  J.,  1883.     This  work 
•does  not  mention  either  of  the  fires  referred  to  above. 


234  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

Majesty's  Province  of  New- Jersey,  and  Territories  there- 
on depending  in  America,  Chancellor  and  Vice- Admiral  in 
the  same,  &c. 

A  PROCLAMATION. 

WHEREAS  it  appears  to  me  on  Oath,  that  the  House  of 
Stephen  Skinner,  Esq;  Treasurer  of  the  Eastern  Division 
of  this  Province,  at  Perth  Amboy,  was,  in  the  Night  of 
the  2 ist  Instant,  robbed  of  Money,  to  the  amount  of 
SEVEN  THOUSAND  POUNDS  and  upwards,  by  some  Person 
or  Persons  unknown.  Part  of  the  said  Money  being  in 
Dollars,  a  small  Part  in  Gold,  and  the  rest  chiefly  in  new 
Bills  of  Credit  of  this  Province;  and  although  diligent 
Search  hath  been  made  after  the  Perpetrator  or  Perpetra- 
tors of  this  daring  and  attrocious  Robbery,  he  or  they  re- 
main as  yet  undiscovered. 

I  have  therefore  thought  fit  to  notify  the  same  by  Proc- 
lamation, hereby  requiring  and  commanding  all  Judges 
Justices  of  the  Peace,  Sheriffs,  and  other  Officers  of  this 
Province,  to  be  particularly  vigilant  in  discovering  the 
Robber  or  Robbers,  and  securing  the  said  Money;  and 
for  that  Purpose  to  examine  all  Persons  they  shall  have 
Reason  to  suspect  of  being  concerned  in  committing  the 
said  Crime. 

And  in  order  to  encourage  a  Zeal  and  Activity  in  this 
Matter,  I  do  hereby,  with  the  Advice  of  His  Majesty's 
Council  (besides  paying  the  Sum  of  FIFTY  POUNDS,  pro- 
vided by  the  Government  in  Cases  of  Burglary)  promise 
to  recommend  to  the  General  Assembly,  that  Provision  be 
made  in  the  amplest  Manner,  to  reward  any  Person  or 
Persons  who  shall  detect,  apprehend,  or  cause  to  be  appre- 
hended, any  or  either  of  the  Persons  concerned  in  the  said 
Robbery,  so  that  he  or  they  be  convicted  thereof;  and  over 
and  above  the  said  Reward,  I  do  hereby  promise  his  Maj- 
esty's most  gracious  Pardon  to  any  Accomplice,  who  shall 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  235 

discover  and  prosecute  to  Conviction  any  one,  or  more  of 
the  said  Offenders. 

GIVEN  under  my  Hand  and  Seal  at  Arms,  at  the  City 
of  Burlington,  the  Twenty-Sixth  Day  of  July,  in  the 
Eighth  Year  of  His  Majesty's  Reign,  Anno  Domini,  1768. 

WILLIAM  FRANKLIN. 
By  his  Excellency's  Command, 

JOSEPH  REED,  jun.  D.  Secretary. 
GOD  Save  the  KING. 

N.  B.  Mr.  Skinner,  by  Advertisement,  offers  a  farther 
Reward  of  ONE  HUNDRED  POUNDS. 

Trenton,  July  19,  1768. 

COMMITTED  to  this  Goal,  a  certain  JOHN  TENDUE,  cord- 
wainer,  belonging  to  RICHARD  CLAYTON,  at  Marcus 
Hook,  advertised  in  the  Gazette  of  the  I2th  of  May  last. 
The  said  JOHN  TENDUE  has  been  advertised  by  letter  sev- 
eral times,  but  no  notice  has  been  taken  of  it.  This  is 
therefore  to  inform  the  said  Richard  Clayton,  unless  he 
comes  and  takes  away  his  apprentice,  paying  charges,  he 
will  be  sold  in  three  weeks  from  the  day  of  the  date  here- 
of, by 

GEORGE  BROWN. 

STOLEN  on  the  i6th  instant,  at  night  from  the  sub- 
scriber, living  in  Kingwood  township,  Hunterdon  county, 
West  New-Jersey,  two  horses,  one  of  which  is  a  light  bay, 
about  10  years  old,  14  hands  and  an  half  high,  with  a 
small  star  in  his  forehead,  a  thick  black  mane,  hanging 
chiefly  on  the  off  side,  and  part  of  it  worn  off  by  the  strap 
of  a  neck-yoke,  the  near  hind  foot  white,  shod  before  with 
large  shoes,  saddle-backed,  and  large-bodied.  The  other 
a  dark  bay,  about  six  years  old,  14  hands  three  inches 
high,  his  mane  hangs  on  the  off  side,  a  star  in  his  forehead, 


236  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

his  off  hind  foot  partly  white,  round  bodied,  somewhat 
sharp  hipped,  shod  before  with  large  shoes,  and  appears 
somewhat  like  a  stallion.  Whoever  secures  said  horses, 
so  as  the  owner  may  have  them  again,  shall  have  Six 
Pounds  reward,  and  reasonable  charges ;  and  Six  Pounds 
for  securing  the  Thieves,  or  Three  Pounds  for  each,  paid 
by 

WILLIAM  COAXES. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.   2066,   July  28, 
1768. 

Monmouth  County.  )  PURSUANT  to  an  Order  of  the 
New-Jersey,  )  " 3*  Hon.  Frederick  Smith,  and  John 
Berrian,  Esqrs,  two  of  the  Judges  of  the  Supreme  Court 
of  said  Province,  upon  the  Petition  of  Michael  and  Peter 
Vanderhoff,  and  Moses  Brown,  insolvent  Debtors,  Notice 
is  hereby  given  to  all  the  Creditors  of  the  said  Petition- 
ers, to  shew  Cause,  (if  any  they  have)  on  Wednesday  the 
7th  Day  of  September  next,  before  the  said  Judges,  at  the 
Court-House  in  Perth-Amboy,  why  an  Assignment  of  the 
said  Petitioners  Estates  should  not  be  made,  and  they  dis- 
charged from  their  Imprisonment,  pursuant  to  the  Direc- 
tion of  the  Acts  of  the  Legislature  of  this  Province  in  such 
Cases  made  and  provided. 

WHEREAS  the  Creditors  of  the  late  John  Stearndall, 
deceased,  have  not  brought  in  their  Accounts  as  desired  in 
a  former  Advertisement;  this  is  therefore  to  give  Notice 
to  all  the  said  Creditors,  to  bring  them  in;  and  all  those 
who  are  indebted  to  the  said  Estate,  are  desired  to  pay 
their  respective  Balances,  on  or  before  the  2Oth  of  August 
inst.  to  Jacob  Bergen,  Esq;  at  Rockey-hill,  or  Richard 
Curson,  in  New- York,  Administrator,  or  they  will  be  put 
into  the  Hands  of  an  Attorney,  without  further  Notice. — 
The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  874, 
August  i,  1768. 


VIEW 


OF 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  237 

To  be  SOLD, 

THE  House  and  Lot  of  land,  lately 
belonging  to  Isaac  Lyon  of  Newark, 
deceased;  the  lot  contains  about  six 
acres  of  land,  and  has  upon  it,  an  or- 
chard of  ninety  apple  trees,  now  in  the 
prime  of  bearing;  a  dwelling  house, 
with  three  fire-places,  a  large  barn  al- 
most new,  with  good  stables ;  a  large  still-house,  with  two 
stills,  good  worms  and  conveniences  for  distilling  cider; 
situate  in  the  town  of  Newark,  about  half  a  mile  from  the 
noted  tavern  kept  by  James  Banks,  and  fronting  the  great 
road  leading  to  Elizabeth-Town.1  Any  person  inclining 
to  purchase  the  same,  by  applying  to  Samuel  Hayes  at 
Newark,  may  know  the  conditions  of  sale,  or  to  John  and 
Mattamiah  Lyon,  at  Morris-Town,  who  will  give  an  in- 
disputable title  to  the  same. 
Newark,  August  2d,  1768. 

— The  Nezv  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1335,  August  4,  1768. 

Evesham,  Burlington  county,  July  28,  1768. 
To  be  sold,  by  the  subscriber,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  on 

Monday,  the  22d  of  August  next, 
FIFTEEN  hundred  acres  of  good  land  and  swamp,  in 
Evesham,  divided  into  lots  suitable  for  farms,  with  a  suit- 
able quantity  of  swamp  and  cleared  meadow  to  each  lot.2 
.  .  .  .  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  all,  or  any 
part  of  the  said  lands  or  mills,  is  invited  to  come  and  view 
them,  before  the  day  of  sale,  who  may  be  further  informed 
by  applying  to  David  Oliphant,  Esq;  on  the  premises. 
The  title  is  good.  The  vendue  to  begin  at  ten  o'clock, 
where  attendance  will  be  given  by  me. 

SAMUEL  COLES. 

1  Probably  on  what  is  now  known  as  Clinton  avenue. 

2  See  The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2014  and  No.   2057. 


238  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

PURSUANT  to  an  act  of  General  Assembly  of  the  prov- 
ince of  New  Jersey,  lately  passed,  entitled  an  act  for  the 
relief  of  insolvent  debtors;  we  the  subscribers  being  now 
closely  confined  in  the  county  of  Salem,  and  having  peti- 
tioned the  judges  of  his  Majesty's  inferior  court  of  com- 
mon pleas,  for  the  county  aforesaid,  for  the  benefit  of  the 
said  act;  do  give  notice  to  all  our  creditors,  to  appear  and 
show  cause,  if  any  they  have,  on  the  first  day  of  September 
next,  at  nine  o'clock  in  the  forenoon  of  that  same  day,  be- 
fore the  said  judges  at  the  Court-House,  in  the  town  of 
Salem,  arid  county  aforesaid,  why  we  should  not  be  dis- 
charged, agreeable  to  the  directions  of  the  said  act. 

JOSHUA  HUDDY,  ANDREW  POLSON,  ABRAHAM  LORD, 
JACOB  HARNIS. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2067, 
August.  4,  1768. 

Mount  Holly,  7th  Month  27,  1768. 

THE  subscriber  thinks  it  necessary  to  inform  the  public 
in  general,  and  his  friends  in  particular,  that  he  is  now 
carrying  on  his  business  of  clock  and  watch-making,  mend- 
ing and  cleaning,  at  his  house  in  Mountholly,  where  those 
that  are  pleased  to  favour  him  with  their  custom,  may  de- 
pend upon  its  being  done  with  the  greatest  care  and  dis- 
patch. 

He  also  finds  himself  under  a  necessity  to  desire  all  those 
indebted  to  him,  to  consider  his  late  misfortune,  and  dis- 
charge their  respective  ballances  immediately,  in  order  to 
enable  him  to  carry  on  his  business  in  the  best  manner  his 
present  low  circumstances  may  admit,  for  the  maintenance 
of  himself  and  family. 

RICHARD  DICKINSON. 

Gloucester,  July  25,  1768. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given  to  all  whom  it  may  concern, 
that  at  the  next  sessions  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the 


1768] 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS. 


239 


province  of  New- Jersey,  application  will  be  made  for  an 
act  to  establish  Great  Timber  Creek,  in  the  county  of  Glou- 
cester, a  lawful  fence,  from  the  mouth  unto  the  north 
branch  of  said  creek.  If  any  persons  have  any  objections, 
let  them  give  their  attendance. 

London,  May  21.  This  Day  was  published,  pr.  is  6. 
A  LETTER  to  a  FRIEND;  containing  Remarks  on  certain 
Passages  in  a  Sermon  preached  by  the  Right  Rev.  JOHN 
Lord  Bishop  of  Landaff,  &c.  &c. 

By  CHARLES  CHAUNCEY,  D.  D. 

With  a  Supplement,  containing  an  Answer  to  the  Plea 
of  T.  B.  Chandler,  D.  D.  of  New-Jersey,  for  American 
Bishops ;  wherein  his  reasoning  are  shewn  to  be  fallacious, 
and  his  claims  undefensible;  -by  a  Presbyter  in  Old-Eng- 
land.— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
875,  Augusts,  1768. 


Perth- Amboy,  July  13,  1768. 

BY  Order  of  Stephen  Skinner,  Rune  Runyon  and  Jo.na- 
than  Frazee,  Esqrs.  Judges  of  the  inferior  Court  of  Com- 
mon Pleas  for  the  County  of  Middlesex,  in  the  Province 
of  New- Jersey,  Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  Creditors  of 
William  Jolly,  an  insolvent  Debtor  in  the  Goal  in  the 
County  of  Middlesex,  to  shew  Cause,  if  any  they  have, 
before  the  said  Judges,  at  the  House  of  Elijah  Dunham, 
Inn-holder,  in  Perth- Amboy,  -  on  Tuesday  the  sixth  Day 
of  September  next,  why  an  Assignment  of  the  said  Debt- 
or's Estate  should  not  be  made,  and  the  said  Debtor  dis- 
charged, pursuant  to  the  Directions  of  a  late  Act  of  the 
Legislature  of  this  Province,  entitled,  An  Act  for  the  Re- 
lief of  insolvent  Debtors. — The  Nezv  York  Gazette  or  the 
Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1336,  August  8,  1768. 


240  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Philadelphia ,  August  8.  Saturday  last  Capt.  Spier  ar- 
rived here,  after  a  long  passage,  from  Glascow,  with  whom 
came  passenger  the  Revd.  and  learned  Dr.  WITHERSPOON, 
President  of  the  college  at  Princeton,  New- Jersey,  with  his 
Lady  and  family. — Supplement  to  The  New  York  Gazette 
or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1336,  August  n,  1768. 

WHEREAS  Gastavus  Kingsland,1  Yesterday  Afternoon 
clandestinely  shot  a  Hog  upon  Sandy-Hook;  and  as  the 
Subscribers  hath  frequently  lost  sucking  Calves,  which 
they  believe  to  have  been  stolen  from  off  Sandy-Hook. 
Therefore  public  Notice  is  hereby  given,  that  any  Person 
or  Persons  that  shall  presume  for  the  Future  to  carry  a 
Gun  or  shoot  on  Sandy-Hook,  without  Liberty  first  ob- 
tained in  Writing  from  under  their  Hands,  will  be  prose- 
cuted with  the  utmost  Rigour  of  the  Law. 

ROBERT  HARTSHORNE. 
ESEK  HARTSHORNE. 
August  2,  1768. 

N.  B.  As  the  abovementioned  Gastavus  Kingsland, 
was  in  Company  with  one  Edward  Collard,  who  it  is 
thought  was  Confederate  with  him.  Said  Collard  is  for- 
bid to  land  or  dig  Clams  on  Sandy-Hook,  as  he  will  be 
looked  upon  as  a  Trespasser  as  soon  as  landed. — The  New 
York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1336,  August 
n,  1768. 

By  the  HONOURABLE 
JOHN  PENN,  Esquire, 

Lieutenant-Governor,  and  Commander  in  Chief  of  the 
Province  of  Pennsylvania,  and  Counties  of  New-Castle. 
Kent  and  Sussex,  on  Delaware. 

A  PROCLAMATION, 
WHEREAS  it  appears  to  me,  by  the  Deposition  of  Ste- 

i  Probably  a  son  of  Gustavus  Kingsland,  of  New  Barbadoes  Neck,  and 
his  wife,  Rachel  Mackleen. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  24! 

phen  Skinner,  Esquire,  Treasurer  of  the  Eastern  Division 
of  New-Jersey,  transmitted  to  me  by  his  Excellency  Gov- 
ernor Franklin,  that  the  House  of  the  said  Stephen  Skin- 
ner, at  Perth- Amboy,  was,  in  the  Night  of  the  Twenty- 
first  Day  of  July  last  past,  robbed  of  Money,  to  the  Am- 
ount of  SEVEN  THOUSAND  POUNDS,  and  upwards,  by  some 
Person  or  Persons  unknown,  Part  of  the  said  Money 
being  in  Dollars,  a  small  Part  in  Gold,  and  the  rest  chiefly 
in  new  Bills  of  Credit  of  that  Province : 

I  HAVE  THEREFORE,  by  and  with  the  Advice  of  the 
Council,  thought  fit  to  issue  this  Proclamation,  hereby 
requiring  and  enjoining  all  Judges,  Justices  of  the  Peace, 
Sheriffs,  and  all  other  Officers  of  the  said  Province  of 
Pennsylvania,  and  Counties  on  Delazvare,  to  use  their  ut- 
most Endeavours  to  discover  and  apprehend  the  Perpetra- 
tor or  Perpetrators  of  the  said  daring  Villany,  and  to  se- 
cure the  said  Money;  and  for  that  Purpose  strictly  to  ex- 
amine all  Persons,  who,  from  being  possessed  of  an  unu- 
sual Sum  of  New- Jersey  Currency,  or  from  other  Circum- 
stances, there  may  be  reason  to  suspect  were  concerned 
therein. 

„  GIVEN  under  my  Hand,  and  the  Great  Seal  of  the  said 
Province,  at  Philadelphia,  the  Sixth  Day  of  Au- 
gust, in  the  Eighth  Year  of  His  Majesty's  Reign, 
and  in  the  Year  of  our  Lord  One  Thousand  Seven 
Hundred  and  Sixty-eight. 

JOHN  PENN. 
By  His  Honour's  Command, 

JOSEPH  SHIPPEN,  junior,  Secretary. 
GOD  save  the  KING. 

THE  SUBSCRIBER,  having  for  many  years,  made  it  her 
business  to  cure  STURGEON  in  North  America,  which  has 
been  esteemed  preferable  to  any  manufactured  by  other 
persons,  and  obtained  the  first  premium  of  Fifty  Pounds 

16 


242  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

sterling,  from  the  society  of  arts  and  commerce  in  Lon- 
don ;  takes  this  method  of  acquainting  the  public,  that  she 
intends,  as  soon  as  possible,  to  leave  this  part  of  the  world, 
but  is  desirous  and  willing  to  instruct  a  sober  industrious 
person  or  family  in  the  whole  art,  secret  and  mystery  of 
manufacturing  sturgeon  in  the  several  branches,  consist- 
ing of  making  isinglass,  pickling,  cavear,  glue,  and  oil; 
the  subscriber  has  lately  fallen  upon  a  method  of  doing  the 
isinglass  equal  to  any  whatever.  Whoever  has  a  mind  to 
treat  with  the  subscriber,  may  apply  to  her  at  Mr.  Elijah 
Bond's  fishery  near  Trenton,  where  is  every  thing  conve- 
nient for  carrying  on  the  business,  and  plenty  of  fish 
throughout  the  whole  year  furnished  by  Mr.  Bond's  fish 
pond. 

MARGARET  BROADFIELD. 

N.  B.  The  sturgeon  manufactory  is  now  carried  on 
by  ELIJAH  BOND,  near  Trenton,  under  the  care  and  in- 
spection of  Mrs.  BROADFIELD,  whose  knowledge  and  ex- 
perience in  that  branch  of  business  is  well  known;  where 
any  person  may  be  supplied,  either  for  shipping  or  home 
consumption,  at  Fifteen  Shillings  for  a  single  three  gallon 
kegg,  or  Twelve  Shillings  and  Six  Pence  by  the  quantity, 
and  in  proportion  for  larger  keggs,  warranted  good. 

They  are  also  sold  at  COXE  and  FURMAN'S  store,  in 
Water  street,  at  the  same  rates. 

To  be  SOLD  by  public  vendue,  on  the  third  of  Septem- 
ber next,  at  10  o'clock  in  the  morning,  a  plantation,  situ- 
ate in  Pilesgrove,  Salem  County,  containing  about  200 
acres,  between  60  and  80  acres  of  which  cleared  land, 
under  good  fence,  and  more  may  be  cleared,  the  wood- 
land well  timbered;  about  20  acres  of  marsh  and  ash 
swamp,  besides  some  run  swamp,  and  a  good  bearing  or- 
chard, of  about  200  trees  of  the  best  fruit;  also  a  fine 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  243 

young  thriving  bearing  peach  orchard,  of  the  best  peaches, 
about  400  trees;  there  are  on  the  place  two  log  houses, 
and  a  spring  of  good  water,  convenient  to  each  house; 
a  log  barn  28  feet  by  20;  it  lies  on  the  north  side  of  Salem 
creek;  and  there  is  a  landing  at  the  corner  of  the  land, 
where  shallops  and  flats  come  and  load.  Also  to  be  sold, 
12  acres  and  a  half  of  cedar  swamp,  about  13  miles  from 
said  land.  The  conditions  of  sale  will  be  made  known, 
and  attendance  given  by 

AARON  SILVER. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2068,  August  n, 
1768. 

Extracts  from  Mr.  Anderson's  Historical  and  Chronologi- 
cal Deduction  of  the  Origin  of  Commerce,  &c.  con- 
firmed from  our  last. 

(Anno  1614.) 

(1664.)  The  Dutch  expelled  from  the  city  and  prov- 
ince of  Nezv-York  by  England,  which  were  granted  by  the 
King  to  the  Duke  of  York;  which  grant  likewise  compre- 
hended New- Jersey;  part  of  which  last  country,  in  the 
same  year,  the  Duke  of  York  regranted  to  the  Lord 
Berkly,  and  Sir  George  Carteret;  and  the  latter's  family 
being  from  the  isle  of  Jersey,  in  the  British  channel,  oc- 
casioned the  name  of  New-Jersey 

Saturday  last  Captain  Bulkeley  arrived  here  from  Lis- 
bon. He  spoke  the  following  Vessels  on  his  Passage,  viz. 
....  in  Lat.  33,00,  Long  59,10,  a  Brig  from  Salem, 
for  Guadaloupe,  14  Days  out 

Burlington  County,  Trenton  Landing. 
To  be  sold  by  public  vendue,  at  the  house  of  John  Doug- 
lass, on  Thursday  the  8th  of  September  next,  between 


244  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [^768 

nine  o'clock  in  the  morning,  and  six  in  the  afternoon,  or 
at  any  time  before  by  private  sale; 

ONE  hundred  and  fifty  acres  of  good  wood  land,  and 
about  fifty  acres  of  good  meadow;  it  fronts  the  river  be- 
tween Trenton  ferry,  and  Messrs.  Cox  and  Furman's 
works,  and  joins  Lamberton  fishery,  and  Elijah  Bond's 
plantation ; a  very  pleasant  high  shore,  with  the  mead- 
ow before  the  door,  fit  for  any  gentleman's  seat,  who  de- 
lights in  fishing  at  Trenton  falls  or  landing.  Any  person 
inclining  to  purchase  twenty  or  fifty  acres  before  the  day 
of  sale,  by  applying  to  the  subscriber,  may  know  the  terms 
of  sale. 

JOHN  DOUGLASS. 

•    — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  84,  August  15- 
22,  1768. 

Elizabeth-Town,  August  12,  1768. 

On  Wednesday  Morning  last,  departed  this  Life,  after 
a  short  Illness,  the  Hon.  SAMUEL  WOODRUFF,  Esq;  one 
of  his  Majesty's  Council  for  this  Province.1  A  Gentleman 
universally  known  for  his  undaunted  Resolution,  un- 
shaken Fidelity,  and  just  Decisions,  in  the  Character  of  a 
Magistrate;  and  for  his  Benevolence,  Hospitality,  public 
Spirit  and  Liberality,  few,  if  any,  excelled  him.  In  his 
private  Life  were  most  eminently  joined,  the  affectionate 
Husband,  tender  Parent,  kind  Master,  faithful  Friend, 
and  to  crown  all,  the  cheerful  and  devout  Christian.  By 
his  sudden  Fall,  several  public,  and  important  Places  of 
Trust  are  become  vacant,  all  of  which  he  filled  with  dis- 
tinguished Integrity.  His  remains  were  decently  interred 
Yesterday  Afternoon  in  the  first  Presbyterian  Church,  at- 
tended by  a  numerous  Concourse  of  People,  from  this  and 
the  neighbouring  Towns,  when  a  very  pertinent  and  judi- 

iFor  a  sketch  of  Samuel  Woodruff,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  X.,  44. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  245 

ciously  applied  Sermon  was  preached  by  the  Rev.  James 
Caldwell,  from  Isaiah  Ivii,  i,  2.  The  righteous  perished, 
and  no  Man  layeth  it  to  Heart,  and  merciful  Men  are  taken 
away,  none  considering,  that  the  Righteous  is  taken  away 
from  the  Evil  to  come.  He  shall  enter  into  Peace,  they 
shall  rest  in  their  Beds,  each  one  walking  in  his  Upright- 
ness. 

To  be  sold,  a  tract  of  salt  meadow  and  Cedar  swamp, 
situate,  lying  and  being  on  New  Barbados  Neck,  in  Ber- 
gen county,  in  New- Jersey,  containing  about  114  acres 
of  salt  meadow,  and  about  322  acres  of  cedar  swamp;  the 
whole  is  bounded  on  the  two  sides  by  Stag's  Creek,  com- 
monly called  Berry's  Creek,  and  by  Peach-Island  Creek. 
The  meadows  are  reckoned  by  those  in  the  neighbourhood, 
who  have  frequently  mowed  in  them,  not  inferior  to  any 
salt  meadow  in  that  part  of  the  country;  and  some  parts 
thereof,  at  a  very  small  expence,  may  be  made  fresh  mead- 
ow, and  to  yield  good  English  grass.  The  timber  and 
wood  of  every  kind  in  the  cedar  swamp,  is  now  in  great 
perfection,  as  the  present  owner  has  preserved  it,  and  pre- 
vented any  of  the  wood  being  cut  out  for  near  upon  30 
years.  The  conveniencies  of  landings  and  easy  carriage 
from  the  said  cedar  swamp,  are  no  way  inferior  to  those  of 
any  other  swamp  on  that  neck;  as  a  great  part  of  the 
swamp  is  bounded  by  Berry's  Creek,  and  common  sloops 
and  wood-boats  go  up  to  the  creek  to  be  loaded ;  and  from 
the  other  side  of  the  tract  the  timber  may  be  brought  to 
Hackensack  River,  by  sleding  or  carting  it  one  quarter  of 
a  mile.  A  plan  or  draught  of  the  said  meadows  and 
swamp,  made  from  a  late  survey,  may  be  seen,  by  apply- 
ing to  Mr.  John  Terhune,  at  Hackinsack,  or  to  the  sub- 
scriber at  New- York. 

If  the  above-mentioned  premises  are  not  sold  before 


246  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

monday  the  third  day  of  October  next,  they  will  then  be 
exposed  to  sale  to  the  highest  bidder,  at  the  court  house 
in  Bergen  county,  in  the  town  of  Hackinsack.  For  the 
greater  convenience  of  purchasers,  the  meadows  will  then 
be  divided  into  five  lots,  and  the  cedar  swamp  into  eight 
lots,  each  lot  of  the  meadow  to  contain  upwards  of  40 
acres;  and  to  be  sold  either  in  separate  lots  or  together, 
as  may  best  suit  the  purchasers.  A  good  title  will  be  given 
to  the  purchaser  or  purchasers,  by 

NICHOLAS  ROOSEVELT. 

Morris  County.  )  PURSUANT  to  an  Order  of  the  Hon- 
New- Jersey,  )  ourable  Frederick  Smith,  and  John 
Berrien,  Esqrs.  two  of  the  Judges  of  the  Supreme  Court 
of  Judicature  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey;  upon  the 
Petition  of  James  Colie,  Lambertus  Laroux,  John  Case, 
and  Samuel  Mun,  insolvent  Debtors,  Notice  is  hereby 
given  to  all  the  Creditors  of  the  said  Petitioners^  to  shew 
Cause  (if  any  they  have)  on  Wednesday  the  seventh  Day 
of  September  next,  at  the  Court-House,  in  Perth- Amboy, 
at  12  o'Clock  of  the  same  Day,  why  an  Assignment  of  the 
said  Petitioners  Estates  should  not  be  made,  and  their 
Bodies  discharged  from  Confinement,  agreeable  to  the  Di- 
rections of  a  late  Act  of  the  Legislature  of  said  Province, 
•  for  the  Relief  of  insolvent  Debtors. — The  New  York  Ga- 
zette and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  876,  August  15,  1768. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Act  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the 
Province  of  A'Vze'-./Vr.y^  entitled  "An  Act  for  the  Relief 
of  Insolvent  Debtors."  We  the  Subscribers  being  now 
confined  in  the  Goal  of  the  County  of  Essex,  and  having 
petitioned  the  Justices  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Judicature 
for  the  Province  aforesaid,  for  the  benefit  of  said  Act,  and 
each  of  us  filed  a  Schedule  of  our  respective  Effects,  do 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  247 

give  Notice  to  all  our  Creditors  to  shew  Cause,  if  any  they 
have,  on  the  Seventh  Day  of  September  next,  at  2  o'clock 
in  the  Afternoon  of  the  same  Day,  before  the  Justices  of 
said  Courts,  at  the  Court  House  in  Perth-  Amboy,  why 
we  should  not  be  discharged  agreeable  to  the  Directions 
of  said  Act. 

DAVID  BALL.     JONAS  BALL.     SAMUEL  JYNNER. 

—  The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post-Boy,  No. 

!337>  August  15,  1768. 

THESE  are  to  give  Notice,  that  all  Persons  who  have 
any  Demands  against  John  Morris  and  Robert  Morris, 
both  insolvent  Debtors  in  Monmouth  County,  in  East 
Jersey,  are  required  to  meet  their  Assignees  on  the  3d 
Day  of  October  next,  at  the  House  of  David  Curtis,  at 
Manasquan,  in  Shrewsbury,  in  said  County,  in  order  to 
certify  their  Demands,  that  the  Assignees  may  proceed, 
pursuant  to  the  late  Act  of  Assembly.  And  also,  all  Per- 
sons who  are  indebted  to  the  Insolvents,  are  required  to 
meet  the  Assignees  at  the  House  of  the  said  Curtis  afore- 
said, on  the  4th  Day  of  October  next,  in  order  to  discharge 
and  settle  their  Accounts,  and  there  will  be  Attendance 
given  by  the  Assignees. 
August  12,  1768. 

DAVID  CURTIS, 
Assignee  for  the  said 
John  &  Ro.  Morris. 

—  The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 

)  August  18,  1768. 


To  BE  SOLD, 

A  HOUSE  and  LOT,  in  the  town  of  Salem,  in  West  New- 
Jersey,  now  in  the  tenure  of  Robert  Johnson,  Esq  ;  the  lot 
is  23  feet  6  inches  in  front  on  the  street  leading  from  the 


248  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

Court-House  to  the  Great  Bridge,  and  extends  above  250 
feet  back,  the  house  20  feet  front,  two  stories  high,  two 
rooms  on  the  first,  and  three  on  the  second  floor,  with 
good  garrets,  and  cellars  under  the  whole  house;  a  large 
kitchen  back,  with  two  rooms  over  it  for  servants ;  a  large 
oven,  and  good  well,  in  the  yard,  and  a  garden,  &c.  Who- 
ever wants  to  purchase  the  same,  may  see  the  house  and 
lot,  and  know  the  terms  of  sale,  by  applying  to  said  JOHN- 
SON, on  the  premises,  or  to  JOHN  MITCHELL,  in  Philadel- 
phia, who  will  give  an  undoubted  title  to  the  same. 

PURSUANT  to  an  act  of  General  Assembly  of  the  prov- 
ince of  New- Jersey,  lately  passed,  intituled,  an  act  for  the 
relief  of  insolvent  debtors;  we  the  subscribers,  being  now 
confined  in  the  goal  of  the  county  of  Hunterdon,  have  peti- 
tioned the  judges  of  the  supreme  court  for  the  benefit  of 
said  act,  and  filed  a  schedule  of  effects,  do  give  notice  to 
all  our  creditors  to  appear,  and  shew  cause,  if  any  they 
have,  on  the  third  day  of  September  next,  at  ten  o'clock 
in  the  forenoon  of  the  same  day,  before  the  judges  of  the 
said  court,  at  the  dwelling  house  of  Rensalier  Williams, 
in  Trenton,  why  they  should  not  be  discharged,  agreeable 
to  the  direction  of  the  said  act.  WILLIAM  HEWLINGS, 
JOSEPH  STOUT,  SAMUEL  PRESTON,  ROBERT  RUTHER- 
FORD.1 — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2069,  August  18, 
1768. 

Friday  last  the  Rev.  JOHN  WITHERSPOON,  'D.  D.  with 
his  family  proceeded  from  this  city  to  Princeton. 

Cumberland  county,  New-Jersey,  August  4,  1768. 
TAKEN  up  this  day  and  committed  to  the  goal  in  this 
county,  a  person  who  calls  himself  by  the  name  of  JOSEPH 
TYLER,  he  appears  to  be  about  twenty-five  years  of  age,  of 

iFor  a  sketch  of  Robert  Rutherford,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  XX..  168. 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  249 

a  middle  stature,  much  mark'd  with  the  small  pox,  and 
wears  his  own  hair:  He  is  committed  on  suspicion  of 
being-  a  run-away  servant,  and  will  be  sold  out  for  costs, 
agreeable  to  law,  except  otherwise  cleared. 

THEO.  ELMER,  sheriff.1 

LONDON. 

June  2.  By  the  epistle  from  the  yearly  meeting  of  the 
people  called  Quakers,  held  in  London,  by  adjournments, 
from  the  23d  of  the  5th  month,  1768,  to  the  28th  of  the 
same,  it  appears,  among  other  things,  that  the  sufferings 
of  Friends,  brought  in  this  year,  being  chiefly  for  tythes, 
and  those  called  church-rates,  in  England  and  Wales, 
amount  to  3469!.  and  upwards;  and  those  in  Ireland 
to  1560!.  and  upwards.  And  by  accounts  from  the 
several  quarterly  meetings  in  England,  and  by  epistles 
from  Wales,  North-Britain,  Ireland,  Holland,  New- York, 
Pennsylvania,  New- Jersey  and  Maryland,  we  are  advised, 
that  several  have  joined  the  society  through  convincement, 
in  divers  places;  and  that  considerable  openness  appears 
in  many  parts  towards  the  testimony  of  truth. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Chronicle,  No.  85,  August  22-29,  1768. 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward. 

RuN-away  on  the  I2th  of  this  Inst.  July,  from  Hanover, 
in  Morris-Town,  and  Province  of  East-New-Jersey,  an 
Irishman,  named  Thomas  Harber,  about  five  Feet  2  In- 
ches high,  has  black  curl'd  Hair,  thin-visaged,  and  has  a 
sandy  Beard :  Had  on  when  he  absconded,  a  brown  Cam- 
blet  Coat,  scarlet  Vest,  and  Ozenbrig  Trowsers.  The 
Night  he  went  away,  he  broke  open  a  small  Leather  Trunk, 
at  the  House  of  Matthias  Burnet,  and  took  therefrom 
Cash  to  the  Amount  of  40!.  in  Jersey  Money,  and  at  the 

i  Theophilus  Elmer  was  Sheriff  of  Cumberland  county,  1766-9. 


250  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

same  Time  stole  a  Coat  mixed  blue  and  white,  bound  with 
blue  Binding,  Mohair  Buttons,  a  Pair  of  Leather  Breech- 
es, a  crimson  Vest,  two  Shirts,  and  sundry  other  Articles. 
Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  the  said  Thief,  so  that  he 
may  be  brought  to  Justice,  shall  receive  the  above  Reward, 
from 

MATHIAS  BURNET,  and 

JAMES  WILKINSON. 

WHEREAS  many  Inconveniencies  frequently  attend  the 
Sale  of  Horses,  Horn  Cattle,  Sheep,  and  Swine,  for  want 
of  some  publick  convenient  stated  Market  or  Fair,  where 
Sellers  and  Buyers  may  meet  for  that  Purpose.  And  as 
the  town  of  Newark,  from  its  Vicinity  to  New- York,  and 
other  Circumstances  attending  its  Situation,  is  by  many,. 
esteemed  a  most  proper  Place  for  such  a  Cattle  Market : 

It  is  at  the  Request  of  a  Number  of  the  Inhabitants  of 
New- York  and  New- Jersey,  that  publick  Notice  is  hereby 
given,  That  on  the  Third  Wednesday  in  October  next, 
and  on  the  Thursday  and  Friday  following,  and  on  the 
same  Days  yearly,  and  every  Year  thereafter,  will  be 
opened  and  held  at  Newark  aforesaid,  a  publick  Market, 
for  the  Sale  of  all  Kinds  of  Horses,  fat  and  Store  Horn 
Cattle,  Sheep  and  Swine,  and  for  no  other  Purpose  what- 
soever, (except  it  be  for  the  Sale  of  the  Products  or  Man- 
ufactories of  the  Country.)  Proper  Officers  will  attend 
for  the  Preservation  of  Decorum  and  good  Order. 

Newark,  August  16,  1768. 

TEN  DOLLARS  Reward. 

RuN-away  from  Hendrick  Coyler,  of  East-New-Jersey, 
a  Negro  Fellow  named  Ishmael,  by  Trade  a  Blacksmith, 
is  much  pitted  with  the  Small  Pox,  has  a  Blemish  in  one 
Eye,  is  a  great  Fidler,  and  often  shewing  slight  of  Hand 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  2$  I 

Tricks;  has  a  Squaw  for  his  Wife.  He  got  leave  of  his 
Master  about  2  Years  since  to  go  towards  Middletown,  to 
look  a  Master;  it  is  said  he  has  work'd  some  Time  at  the 
Iron  Works,  near  Spotswood,  'tis  thought  he  is  since  gone 
towards  Pennsylvania;  he  has  been  acquainted  about 
East-Town.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Fellow  and  delivers 
him  to  Capt.  Elias  Dayton,  in  Elizabeth-Town,  or  said 
Colyer,  at  Horse-Neck,  shall  have  the  above  Reward,  with 
reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

HENDRICK  COLYER 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
877,  August  22,  1768. 

To  the  PRINTER, 

SIR, 

Please  to  give  the  following  a  place  in  your  next  paper. 

FOR  some  time  past  I  have  observ'd  a  controversy  in 
some  of  our  colonies,  respecting  the  introduction  of  Eng- 
lish Bishops  among  us.  Dr.  Chandler  appealed  to  the  pub- 
lic, to  know  if  they  had  any  objection,  why  one  or  more 
Bishops  shou'd  not  be  sent  to  America;  and  laid  before 
them,  the  restrictions  with  which  they  'were  desired,  viz. 
"That  the  Bishops  to  be  sent  to  America,  shall  have  no 
authority,  but  purely  of  a  spiritual  and  ecclesiastical  na- 
ture, such  as  is  derived  altogether  from  the  church,  and 
not  from  the  state.  That  his  authority  shall  operate  only 
upon  the  clergy  of  the  church,  and  not  upon  the  laity,  or 
dissenters  of  any  denomination.  That  the  Bishops  shall 
not  interfere  with  the  property  or  privileges,  whether  civil 
or  religious,  of  churchmen  or  dissenters.  That,  in  partic- 
ular, they  shall  have  no  concern  with  the  probate  of  wills, 
letters  of  guardianship,  and  administration,  or  marriage 
licenses,  nor  be  judges  of  any  cases  relating  thereto.  But 
that  they  shall  only  exercise  the  original  powers  of  their 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

office,  namely,  ordain  and  govern  the  clergy,  and  adminis- 
ter confirmation  to  those  who  shall  desire  it.*"  Several 
objectors  have  appeared.  A  periodical  paper,  published 
in  New- York,  intituled  the  American  Whig,  the  Centinel, 
in  Philadelphia,  &c.  Tho'  the  former,  it  seems,  does  not 
object  against  Bishops  with  the  above  restriction :  "The 
Appeal,  says  he,  asks  nothing  but  what  is  highly  reason- 
able ."  But  affirms  that  it  is  "altogether  impossible"  to 
have  Bishops,  on  the  terms  proposed.  Much  has  been 
written  pro  and  con — and  perhaps  a  great  deal  foreign  to 
the  purpose,  and  unbecoming  the  professors  of  Christian- 
ity. As  the  cause  is  debating  before  the  tribunal  of  the 
public,  I  wou'd  beg  leave  to  give  the  sketch  of  a  plan, 
whereby  they  may  be  better  enabled  to  form  a  right  judg- 
ment. Suppose  some  judicious,  impartial  person,  shou'd 
collect  all  the  pieces  that  are,  and  shall  be,  published  on  the 
subject;  and  exhibit  weekly,  or  monthly,  in  our  public 
prints,  the  substance  of  all  the  arguments  made  use  of,  at- 
tending only  to  the  merits  of  the  cause.  This  might  be 
done  by  way  of  dialogue,  in  a  short,  expressive  manner. 
But  I  foresee  an  objection  that  will  arise.  Where  shall  we 
find  the  judicious,  impartial  person?  It  must  be  confess'd 
the  objection  is  weighty;  and  'tis  to  be  lamented,  that 
there  are  such  animosities  and  divisions  between  those, 
who  enrol  their  name  among  the  followers  of  the  Prince 
of  peace — But  as  there  are  many  persons  in  our  colonies 
of  good  abilities,  natural  and  acquired,  it  wou'd  be  un- 
charitable not  to  believe  that  some  of  them,  have  so  great 
a.  sense  of  the  Deity — so  zealous  for  the  glory  of  God,  and 
the  good  of  mankind — so  far  from  being  bigoted  to  this, 
or  that,  particular  party,  that  they  wou'd  disdain  to  blow 
up  the  sparks  of  party  spirit,  or  to  transgress  the  laws  of 
truth  and  decency.  Shou'd  such  a  person  put  in  execution 


*  Appeal  to  the  public,  p.  79. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  -2  5  ^ 

the  plan  propos'd,  or  something  of  the  like  nature,  and  en- 
deavour to  sow  the  seeds  of  peace  and  harmony  among  his 
fellow-creatures  (so  necessary  at  this  juncture,  for  our 
political  interest)  I  doubt  not  but  the  sincere  Christian 
will  thank  him  for  his  labour  of  love;  and  that  he  will  see 
the  accomplishment  of  that  promise,  made  us  by  our  Di- 
vine Redeemer — Blessed  are  the  peace-makers,  for  they 
shall  be  called  the  children  of  God. 

PHILANTHROPOS. 

— — ,  in  New- Jersey,  July  28,  1 768. 
—The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.. 

1338,  April  22,  1768. 

Philadelphia,  August  22.  On  Saturday  last  a  Man  was- 
committed  to  Gloucester  Gaol,  on  Suspicion  of  being  con- 
cerned in  the  Robbery  of  the  East- Jersey  Treasury.  The 
Reasons  which  induced  the  Justice  to  commit  him  were, 
that  he  had  with  him  a  Quantity  of  Jersey  Bills,  mostly 
new,  which  he  seemed  anxious  to  exchange  for  any  other 
Money — that  he  gave  a  very  improbable  Account  of  the 
Manner  in  which  he  got  it,  and  seemed  very  desirous  of 
going  into  a  retired  Part  of  the  Jerseys,  to  live  for  some 
Time.  That  he  said  he  had  been  Clerk  of  a  Ship  on  a 
Voyage  to  the  West-Indies,  but  could  not  sign  his  Name- 
to  his  Examination. 

This  is  to  give  NOTICE, 

To  all  whom  it  may  concern,  That  the  Subscribers,  in- 
solvent Debtors,  confined  in  the  Gaol  of  the  County  of 
Sussex,  in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey;  have  applied  to 
the  Judges  of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas  for  the  said 
County,  to  be  discharged  agreeable  to  an  Act  of  the  Gen- 
eral Assembly  of  the  said  Province,  for  that  Purpose  late- 
ly made  and  provided  :  And  the  said  Judges  have  appoint- 


254  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

ed  the  26th  Day  of  September  next,  to  meet  at  the  Court- 

House  in  said  County  for  that  Purpose. 

JOHN  ARRENT 
JOHN  HERRETT 
WILLIAM  PARKS 
HENRY  GILLIAM,  Jun 

August  20,  1768. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

On  Friday  the  2d  day  of  September  next,  on  the  Premises ; 
THE  plantation  lately  the  property 


VIEW 

OF 

HOUSES 
AND  BARNS 


of  James  Leslie,  adjoining  the  South- 
Branch  of  Rariton-river,  in  the  county 
of  Somerset,  in  the  province  of  New- 
Jersey;  containing  about  83  acres  of 
land,  20  acres  whereof  is  very  good 


meadow  and  20  acres  of  wood-land : 
There  is  on  said  plantation  a  very  good 
grist-mill  with  two  pairs  of  stones;  three  bolting-mills, 
all  go  by  water,  and  the  meal  is  hoisted  by  water;  a  very 
good  saw-mill;  two  dwelling  houses;  a  merchant  shop 
adjoining  one  of  said  houses;  a  smoke  house;  coopers 
shop,  a  large  barn  covered  with  cedar;  and  a  large  or- 
chard, all  in  very  good  repair.  The  said  plantation  is  so 
situated  as  to  carry  on  a  large  trade  in  the  milling  and 
merchandizing  business.  The  same  day  will  also  be  sold 
on  the  premises,  houshold  furniture,  cows,  hogs,  farmers 
utensils :  A  large  quantity  of  boards  and  a  large  parcel  of 
shop  goods,  and  sundry  other  articles  too  tedious  to  men- 
tion. The  vendue  to  begin  at  ten  o'clock  of  said  day: 
Also  will  be  sold  on  tuesday  the  thirtieth  day  of  Septem- 
ber next,  on  the  premises,  about  250  acres  of  good  wheat 
land,  situated  in  Ridclings-town,  in  the  county  of  Hunter- 
don  and  province  aforesaid,  bounded  on  Lomarton-river, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  255 

and  land  of  Denise  Hegaman  and  others.  The  vendue  to 
begin  at  ten  o'clock  of  said  day,  where  conditions  of  sale 
will  be  made  known,  and  attendance  given  by 

THEODORUS  VAN  WYCK, 

JOHN  SHIPBOY 

PETER  FERINE 

ABRAHAM  VAN  NESTE 

Millstone,  August  15,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1338,  August  25,  1768. 

Saturday  last  a  Man,  suspected  of  being  concerned  in 
robbing  the  Treasury  of  East  Jersey,  was  taken  up  and 
committed  to  Gloucester  Goal.  He  had  a  Quantity  of 
New -Jersey  Money  in  his  Possession,  but  on  Examina- 
tion, could  give  no  satisfactory  Account  how  he  came  by 
it. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  VALUABLE  tract  of  land  in  Gloucester  counuty,  West 
Jersey,  situate  on  Raccoon  creek,  and  containing  upwards 
of  1000  acres.  It  lies  near  the  Swedish  church,  adjoining, 
on  the  west-side,  to  land  of  Thomas  James,  at  Raccoon 
bridge,  on  the  main  road  from  Gloucester  to  Salem,  not 
20  miles  distant  from  Philadelphia.  The  whole  is  well 
wooded  and  watered.  On  great  part  of  it  there  is  plenty 
of  white  oak  timber.  A  branch  of  Raccoon  creek  runs 
through  this  tract,  and  affords  several  commodious  mill- 
seats.  There  is  a  considerable  quantity  of  rich  swamp, 
which  might,  at  a  small  expence,  be  made  valuable  mead- 
ow. As  the  whole  of  this  land  is  well  wooded  and  tim- 
bered, its  value  is  greatly  increased  by  its  being  situated 
on  a  river  navigable  for  large  shallops.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  purchase,  may  know  the  terms  of  sale,  by  apply- 


256  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

ing  to  WILLIAM  HICKS,  Esq;  in  Second-street,  Philadel- 
phia.— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2070,  August  25, 
1768. 

Capt.  Lockton  from  St.  Kitts,  informs  that  the  Schoon- 
er Charming  Polly,  Capt.  Anderson  zvas  arrived  at  St. 
Kitts,,  in  20  days  from  Barnegat.  He  spoke  the  sloop 
Peggy,  Capt.  Alexander  Stewart,  belonging  to  New-York, 
lying  off  St.  Eustatia,  bound  from  Montserrat  for  the  Bay 
of  Honduras. 

TWENTY-EIGHT  DOLLARS  Reward. 
RUN  away  from  Tanton  Forge,  Burlington  county,  the 
following  indented  servants. 

•  ZEBULON  HOGE,  country  born,  about  six  feet  high,  and 
slim,  black  or  dark  brown  hair,  aged  about  26  years,  by 
trade  a  blacksmith,  slow  spoken ;  he  left  the  forge  in  Sep- 
tember last,  and  it  was  expected  he  would  return,  but  is 
now  in  or  about  Augusta  county,  Virginia,  where  his 
father  lives. 

JOSEPH  VANOTE,  born  in  Monmouth  county,  New-Jer- 
sey, aged  about  30  years,  well  known  in  his  present  walks, 
which  are  about  Monahockin  and  Little  Egg-Harbour, 
went  off  this  spring. 

RANDLE  M'DONALD,  by  trade  a  finer,  and  has  work'd 
a  little  at  blooming,  aged  near  forty  years,  was  born  in 
Ireland,  about  four  feet  ten  inches  high,  black  hair  &  large 
black  beard,  slow  spoken,  (if  not  in  liquor)  hard  of  hear- 
ing and  smoak'd  much;  left  the  forge  the  2ist  instant: 
He  wore  oznabrigs  shirt  and  trowsers,  blue  lapelled  jacket 
with  metal  buttons,  a  narrow  trimmed  hat,  which  has  been 
painted,  and  has  with  hirii  oznabrigs  shirts  or  frocks,  which 
reach  to  his  ankles,  &  a  new  pair  of  shoes  tied  with 
strings.  Whoever  takes  up  said  servants,  and  secures 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  2 57 

them  in  any  of  the  goals  of  Pennsylvania  or  New-Jersey, 
shall  have  FIVE  POUNDS  for  the  first;  THREE  POUNDS  for 
the  second;  and  FIFTY  SHILLINGS  for  the  last,  paid  by 

CHARLES  READ. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1342,  August  25, 
1768. 

New-York,  August  29.  We  hear  from  Perth- Amboy, 
that  on  Monday  last  died  there,  in  an  advanced  Age,  Mr. 
John  Watson,  a  Gentleman  noted  for  several  Peculiarities 
in  his  Way  of  Living.1 

To  BE  SOLD, 

SIXTEEN  Lots  of  Ground  adjoining  to  the  Town  of 
Bergen,  in  East-New-Jersey.  Lot  No.  i.  butts  on  three 
Public  Highways,  and  contains  Half  an  Acre,  and  two 
Perches.  No.  2.  butts  on  two  Highways,  and  contains 
Half  an  Acre,  and  eighteen  Perches.  No.  3.  butts  on  two 
Roads,  and  wants  only  four  Rods  of  a  full  Acre.  Num- 
bers 4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9,  10,  ii,  12,  13,  14,  and  15,  contains 
one  Acre  each;  and  No.  16,  contains  one  Acre,  one  Quar- 
ter, and  ii  Perches.  For  the  Conveniency  of  said  Lots, 
a  Street  of  33  Feet  wide  is  laid  out  in  the  front  of  them, 
containing  one  Acre  and  n  Perches.  The  whole  pleas- 
antly situated,  having  beautiful  Views  of  the  City  of  New- 
York,  North-River,  Bay,  and  Narrows;  the  Land  good 
&c.  That,  to  prevent,  unnecessary  Trouble,  the  fixed  Price 
is  Sixty  Pounds  for  each  Lot,  except  Lot  No.  16,  which  is 

1  John  Watson,  the  first  painter  known  to  have  settled  in  America, 
came  from  Scotland  about  1715,  and  took  up  his  residence  at  Perth 
Amboy.  He  returned  to  Europe,  and  brought  thence  to  America  a 
considerable  collection  'of  pictures,  some  of  his  own  composition.  So 
that  "the  first  painter,  and  the  first  collection  of  pointings  [in  Amer- 
ica] of  which  we  have  any  knowledge,  were  planted  at  Perth  Amboy." 
Mr.  Watson  was  so  penurious  that  he  was  styled  "the  Miser  of  Perth 
Amboy,"  and  besides  was  extremely  irascible.  He  was  unmarried,  his 
family  consisting  of  himself,  a  nephew,  and  a  niece,  for  whom  he  had 
sent  to  Scotland  soo*  after  his  establishment  here.  He  died  August 
22.  1768.  aged  83  years,  and  is  buried  in  the  rear  of  St.  Peter's  church. 
What  became  of  his  paintings  is  not  known. — WMtehead's  Perth  Amboy, 
125. 

17 


258  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

Seventy-five  Pounds;  for  further  Particulars  enquire  of 
William  Crellin,  near  Fresh-Water,  or  William  Butler, 
between  Crown  and  Queen-Streets,  on  the  North-River 
Neiv-York. 

City  of  New-Brunswick,  August  25. 
NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  on  Monday  the  22d  Inst. 
were  taken  up  and  committed  to  Goal,  two  Likely  young 
Negroe  Fellows;  one  calls  himself  LONDON,  about  5  Feet 
6  Inches  high;  the  other  ROBERT,  about  5  Feet  3  Inches : 
They  pretend  to  be  free;  say  that  they  did  belong  to  a 
Gentleman  a  Merchant  from  St.  Christophers;  that  they 
came  with  their  Master  to  New-York,  who  lodged  with 
the  Widow  Richardson,  on  Rotten-Row;  that  their  Mas- 
ter died  there  last  Spring,  and  before  his  Death  gave  them 
free.  The  chief  Qoathing  about  them,  was  contain'd  in  a 
good  Ozenbrigs  Bag,  mark'd  P.  R.  No.  19,  viz.  a  White 
Fustian  Coat,  lined  with  Shalloon,  a  pair  of  Leather 
Breeches,  one  White  Linnen  Jacket,  5  White  Shirts,  one 
pretty  fine,  mark'd  W.  I.  2  pair  of  Cloth  Breeches,  2  pair 
of  Trowsers,  one  pair  of  Yarn,  and  2  pair  of  Worsted 
ribb'd  Stockings,  one  White  Handkerchief,  one  Duffields 
Great  Coat;  had  on  each  a  Beaver  Hat,  one  about  half 
worn;  Jackets,  coarse  Shirts  and  Trousers,  Calf  Skin 
Shoes,  pretty  good,  and  in  Appearance  had  belonged  to  a 
Gentleman.  Whoever  claims  said  Negroes,  are  desired 
to  be  speedy  in  taking  them  out.  Or  if  Mrs.  Richardson, 
or  any  other  Person  knows  them  to  be  free,  are  desired  to 
give  Notice  thereof,  that  upon  paying  Charges,  they  may 
be  set  at  Liberty — The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  No.  1339,  August  29,  1768. 

Elisabeth-Town,  August  12,   1768. 
On  Wednesday  morning  last  departed  this  life,  after  a 
short  illness,  the  Honourable  Samuel  Woodruff,  Esq ;  one 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  259 

of  his  Majesty's  Council  for  this  province. — A  Gentleman 
universally  known  for  his  undaunted  resolution,  unshaken 
fidelity,  and  just  decisions,  in  the  character  of  a  Magis- 
trate; and  for  his  benevolence,  hospitality,  public  spirit 
and  liberality,  few,  if  any,  excelled  him.  In  his  private 
life  were  most  eminently  joined,  the  affectionate  husband, 
tender  parent,  kind  master,  faithful  friend,  and  to  crown 
all,  the  cheerful  and  devoted  Christian. — The  Pennsylva- 
nia Chronicle,  No.  85,  Postscript,  August  31,  1768. 

The  PUBLIC  are  advertised, 

THAT  there  is  to  be  sold,  at  the  late  Dwelling  House  of 
Samuel  Woodruff,  Esq;  deceased,  in  Elizabeth-Town,  by 
public  Vendue,  on  Tuesday  the  I3th  of  this  Instant  Sep- 
tember, a  great  Variety  of  Goods,  consisting  of  genteel 
Houshold  Furniture,  a  Number  of  Negroes,  male,  and  fe- 
male; old  and  young  excellent  Horses,  both  for  Saddle 
and  Carriage,  a  neat  Caravan,  hung  on  Springs;  several 
Pair  of  good  Oxen,  the  best  Milch  Cows,  a  Number  of 
young  Cattle,  a  herd  of  Swine,  a  complete  Set  of  farming 
Utensils,  a  Quantity  of  well  cured  Hay,  both  English, 
fresh  and  salt,  Wheat,  Oats,  and  Flax  in  the  Sheaf,  Indian 
Corn  in  the  Ground,  with  other  almost  innumerable  Arti- 
cles. 

At  ten  of  the  Clock  in  the  Forenoon  of  the  said  I3th 
Day  of  September,  the  Sale  will  begin;  and  the  Condi- 
tions of  Payment  for  the  purchased  Articles  made  known 
by  us, 

ELIZABETH  WOODRUFF,  Administratrix. 
BENJAMIN  WOODRUFF, 
JOSEPH  WOODRUFF,  Jun. 
ISAAC  WOODRUFF,  Esq. 
Administrators. 

— The  Nezv  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1339,  September  i,  1768. 


260  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

A  LIST  of  LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post-Office  in 
Trenton, 

Martin  Armstrong,  Somerset  Court-House. 

B.  Peter  Bandeler,  New  Germantown,  to  the  Care  of 
Justice  Cole;    Zaccheus  Beebe,  Trenton;    Garrett  Byrne, 
near  Amwell;    Simeon  Brenner,  Allen's  Town;    William 
Boyd,  Augusta  County,  near  Philadelphia. 

C.  Philip  Calvin,  Amwell;  John  Calvert,  East  Jersey; 
Thomas  Compson,  Andover  Furnace,  New- Jersey. 

D.  James  Douglass,  Somerset  County;    Patrick  Dor- 
cey,  Morris  County;    Philip  Davis,  Trenton. 

H.  Thomas  Homfray,  Kingwood;  Samuel  Hender- 
son, Freehold;  Samuel  Hook,  Samuel  Henry,  Mrs.  Mary 
Harrison,  Trenton;  George  Hipworth,  Tanton  Forge. 

K.  William  Kirkpatrick,  Trenton;  William  Kass, 
Amwell;  John  King,  Somerset  County. 

L.  Richard  Laning,  Henry  Landis,  Amwell;  Dr. 
Peter  Le  Conte,  East  New  Jersey;  Mrs.  Mary  Lee,  to  the 
Care  of  Capt.  Anderson,  near  Trenton. 

M.  John  Moore  (2)  Trenton;  Nathaniel  Moore, 
Hopewell;  George  M'Leary,  Maidenhead;  James  M'Call, 
Springfield,  Monmouth  County;  Joseph  M'Guffock,  Al- 
len's Town. 

O.     Nathan  Ogden,  Reading  Town. 

P.     John  Purdy,  near  Allen's  Town;    Peter  Post. 

Q.     Alexander  Qua  (2)  Monmouth  County. 

R.  Peter  Ryan,  Trenton;  Mrs.  Sarah  Rogers,  Reck- 
less Town;  John  Rogers  (2)  Lamp  Town;  Alexander 
Ross,  Mount-Holly. 

S.  John  Spangenberg,  Newtown,  Sussex  County; 
Joseph  Sinclear  (2)  Quaker  Town;  Brice  Steel,  Michael 
Sands,  Trenton;  Col.  Joseph  Stout,  Hopewell;  Robert 
Sherwood,  Burlington  County. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  26 1 

W.  Isaac  Waines,  Squire's  Point;  Robert  Wallace, 
Bordentown. 

Y.  William  Young,  Bordentown. 

THREE  POUNDS  Reward. 

MADE  his  escape  from  Trenton  goal,  the  I2th  of  Au- 
gust last,  a  certain  Jacob  Hoover,  alias  Jacob  Matthews; 
had  on,  when  he  went  away,  a  white  homespun  shirt, 
striped  trowsers,  thread  stockings,  a  castor  hat,  somewhat 
worn,  with  a  black  crape  round  it,  and  a  black  handker- 
chief round  his  neck,  about  5  feet  u  inches  high,  well 
built,  speaks  French  and  High  Dutch,  but  indifferent  Eng- 
lish. Whoever  takes  up  the  said  person,  shall  have  the 
above  reward,  paid  by  me 

GEORGE  BROWN,  Goaler. 

To  be  SOLD  by  public  vendue,  on  the  3Oth  day  of  Sep- 
tember instant,  on  the  premises, 

A  CERTAIN  PLANTATION,  containing  120  acres,  lying 
and  being  in  the  township  of  Lower  Penn's  Neck,  in  the 
County  of  Salem,  West  New-Jersey,  bounding  on  Salem 
creek ;  there  are  two  good  landings  on  said  creek,  to  which 
considerable  quantities  of  cordwood  are  brought  for  trans- 
portation to  Philadelphia.  There  are  on  said  plantation, 
a  good  dwelling-house,  about  50  or  60  acres  of  plowable 
ground,  a  sufficient  quantity  of  meadow,  and  more  may 
be  made,  as  the  land  is  mostly  low,  and  suitable  -for  mead- 
ow; the  unimproved  part  is  very  well  timbered,  and  not 
far  to  the  landing.  The  conditions  of  sale  will  be  made 
known  at  the  time  and  place  of  sale,  by  me 

SlNNICK   SlNNICKSON. 

PHILADELPHIA,  September  i. 

Captain  Davidson,  from  Madeira — on  the  2Oth  ult. 
about  60  Leagues  to  the  Eastward  of  our  Capes — spoke 


262  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

the  Ship  Philadelphia,  Captain  M'Cutchon,  from  this  Port 
for  Cork,  2  Days  out. 

On  the  2  ist  Instant,  at  Night,  died  ELIZABETH  AL- 
LINSON,  jim.  Wife  of  SAMUEL  ALLINSON,  Esq;  of  Bur- 
lington, after  a  short  "Illness  of  a  violent  nervous  Fever, 
and  was  on  the  23d  decently  interred  in  the  Burying 
Ground  of  the  People  called  Quakers,  at  that  Place.  To 
her  Memory  it  may  be  justly  said,  she  was  a  good  Wife; 
a  very  tender  Mother;  an  affectionate  daughter;  a  kind 
Sister;  a  warm  and  constant  Friend;  charitable  to  the 
Poor.  She  lived  beloved  by  those  who  knew  her,  and  died 
much,  lamented.  In  this  distressing  Situation,  her  af- 
flicted Husband  has  the  consolatory  Reflection,  that  after 
the  tenderest  Love  subsisting  •  between  them,  during  the 
Time  of  their  Marriage,  the  inward  State  of  her  Mind, 
several  Times  expressed  by  herself,  pretty  early,  as  well 
as  in  the  latter  Part  of  her  Illness,  gives  the  best  Reason 
to  believe  she  nowr  enjoys  the  Rewards  of  a  virtuous  Life. 

Early  on  the  22d,  departed  this  Life  ELIZABETH  ALLIN- 
SON, aged  about  70  Years.1  She  was  possessed  of  many 
good  qualities,  that  endeared  her  to  her  family  and 
Friends.  For  several  Years  past  the  Infirmities  of  old  Age 
have  impaired  her  Understanding,  weakening  all  her  Fac- 
ulties, at  last  gave  her  a  quiet  Exit  out  of  this  troublesome 
World.  As  she  had  always  lived  in  great  Harmony  with, 
and  much  esteemed  her  Daughter,  the  Sorrow  her  Illness 
gave  her,  affords  Reason  to  believe  it  was  a  Means  of 
hastening  the  Mother's  End.  They  were  carried  to  their 
Graves  together,  attended  by  a  great  Number  of  Rela- 
tions, and  Friends  of  all  Denominations.  The  sudden 
Death  of  the  First,  in  the  Flower  of  her  Time,  and  the 

i  Elizabeth  Allinson,  wife  of  Joseph  Allinson,  who  came  to  America 
in  1718  and  married  her  in  1721.  She  was  a  dau.  of  Thomas  and  Phebe 
Scattergood,  the  last-named  being  a  dau.  of  Christopher  Wetherell. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  263 

midst  of  Enjoyment  teaches,  in  lively  Characters  that  it 
is  our  highest  Interest  to  "remember  our  Creator  in  the 
Day's  of  our  Youth,"  by  a  sober  religious  Life,  since  no 
Age  or  Circumstance  is  exempt  from  the  Stroke  of  Death. 

WANTED, 
For  the  attending  a  Mill  in  the  Jerseys,  about  Thirty 

Miles  from  Philadelphia. 

A  MILLER,  a  single  Man,  that  well  understands  the 
manufacturing  Wheat,  &c,  and  can  invoice  the  Flour,  and 
bring  a  good  Character  (such  a  Person  only)  may  hear 
of  a  Place,  by  applying  to  the  Printers  hereof. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette,  No.  2071,  September  i,  1768. 

City  of  Perth- Amboy,  New  Jersey,  ss.    August  15. 

WHEREAS  two  MEN  was  committed  to  the  goal  of 
said  city,  on  the  nth  of  this  instant,  August,  by  Stephen 
Skinner.  Esq;  on  suspicion  of  being  Run  aways,  which 
they  have  since  confessed.  Their  names  are  Charles  Con- 
ner and  Charles  Lee :  Conner  says  he  is  a  convict,  from 
Ireland,  and  arrived  in  Maryland  in  August  1765,  and 
was  sold  to  William  Gill,  his  present  master,  who  lives  in 
Baltimore  county,  within  twenty  miles  of  said  town,  in 
the  province  of  Maryland  aforesaid;  he  is  39  years  of 
age,  about  5  feet  7  inches  high,  fair  complection,  brown 
hair  light  grey  eyes;  had  on  an  old  felt  hat,  fearnought 
jacket,  a  coarse  white  shirt,  tow  trowsers,  old  shoes,  &c. 

LEE  says  he  is  a  convict  from  London,  where  he  was 
born,  and  arrived  in  Maryland  in  the  year  1764,  and  was 
consigned  to  Stevenson  and  Plowman,  and  was  sold  by 
them  to  Joseph  Ausborn,  who  bought  him  for  Joseph 
Crummel,  his  present  master;  who  lives  within  two  miles 
of  William  Gill,  the  master  of  the  aforesaid  servant :  He 
is  about  5  feet  8  inches  high;  remarkable  brown  com- 
plection, black  curled  hair;  had  on  an  old  wool  hat,  two 


264  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

shirts,  a  pair  of  pumps;  he  says  he  threw  away  his  jacket, 
which  was  fearnought:  They  both  say  they  Run-away 
on  the  1 4th  of  July  last,  in  company.  Now  these  are  to 
give  notice  to  the  masters  of  said  servants,  or  whom  it 
may  concern,  that  the  said  servants  may  be  had  by  apply- 
ing to  RICHARD  CARNS,  junr. 

N.  B.  The  masters  of  said  servants  are  hereby  notified, 
that  unless  they  apply  for  said  servants,  pay  cost,  and  take 
them  away  within  two  months  from  the  publication  here- 
of, they  will  be  sold  for  the  cost  aforesaid. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Journal,  No.  1343,  September  i,  1768. 

TAKEN  up  and  committed  to  Amboy  gaol,  in  East-Jer- 
sey, on  Saturday  the  27th  of  August,  an  Englishman,  25 
years  of  age,  and  is  supposed  to  be  William  Dennet,  ad- 
vertised in  the  Pennnsylvania  Chronicle  by  James  Rankin, 
of  Newbury  township,  York  county,  as  he  seems  to  an- 
swer the  description  in  every  shape,  except  some  of  his 
clothes,  which,  it  is  supposed  he  has  changed.  A  small 
Scotch  woman  was  with  him,  who  answers  the  descrip- 
tion every  way;  over  night  he  shewed  a  pass,  dated  Au- 
gust 3,  signed  by  three  Justices,  viz.  John  Runnolds. 
William  Smith,  but  the  other  name  is  forgot;  he  calls 
himself  William  Ross,  and  the  Woman  Elizabeth  his  wife, 
agreeable  to  the  pass ;  being  told  that  their  pass  was  forg- 
ed, and  that  they  had  best  destroy  it,  next  day  it  could  not 
be  found,  and  then  he  owned  the  woman  was  not  his 
wife.  They  gave  very  different  accounts,  but  said  they 
came  from  Conegocheague — The  man  will  not  own  that 
he  was  a  servant.  For  further  particulars  inquire  of  the 
printer. 

BORDENTOWN,  September  3. 
On  Thursday  last  FRANCIS  HOPKINSON,  Esq;1  of  PHIL- 


iFor  a  sketch  of  Francis  Hopkinson,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  X.,  426. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  265 

ADELPHIA,  zvas  joined  In  the  Velvet  Bands  of  HYMEN,  to 
Miss  NANCY  BORDEN,  of  this  Place,  a  Lady  amiable  both 
for  her  internal  as  well  as  external  Accomplishments,  and 
in  the  Words  of  a  celebrated  Poet: 

"Without  all  shining,  and  within  all  white; 
Pure  to  the  Sense,  and  pleasing  to  the  Sight." 
— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  86,  September  5, 
1768. 

Mr.  GODDARD, 

On  my  reading  in  your  Chronicle,  No.  78  and  79,  some 
remarks  made  on  a  piece  I  happened  to  write,  I  expected 
that  a  calm  review  would  have  produced  some  proper  con- 
cessions— but  hozv  greatly  was  I  disappointed,  when  in- 
stead of  the  gentlemen  themselves  appearing,  I  found  Mr. 
I.  Y.  (a  very  good  man  for  ought  I  know)  come  forth, 
attempting,  with  some  feeble  acknowledgments,  to  cover 
their  retreat,  smooth  matters  over,  and  prevent  any  thing 
further  being  said.  I  hope  therefore  you  will  be  kind 
enough  to  allow  the  following  a  place,  as  soon  as  conve- 
nient, in  your  extensively  useful  paper,  which  will  much 
oblige  your  constant  reader,  and  humble  servant, 

Essex  County,  E.  N.  Jersey,  B.  O. 

August  22,  1768. 

WHEN,  upon  my  return  from  Synod,  I  wrote  that  letter 
to  my  friend  which  afterwards  appeared  in  the  Chronicle, 
No.  76,  little  did  I  expect  it  could  have  subjected  me  to 
such  severe  censure  as  I  have  since  met  with  in  No.  78 
and  79  of  the  same  paper;  or  that  the  sons  of  Levi,  of  the 
present  day  retained  so  much  of  their  fathers  temper 
(Gen.  xlix.  5,  6)  as  those  two  reverend  gentlemen  have 
discovered  who  took  it  in  their  heads  to  give  me  a  little 

clerical  correction  in  behalf  of  the  body 

[Signed]    B.  O. 


266  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

To  be  sold  by  Joseph  Worth,  by  virtue  of  a  poiver  of 
attorney,  from  Giles  Worth,  at  public  vendue,  on  the  twen- 
tieth day  of  October  next,  upon  the  premises, 

ONE  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  land,  situate  in  the 
township  of  Maidenhead  and  Hopewell,  joining  upon 
Stoney  Brook,  five  miles  from  Princeton,  has  upon  it  a 
good  dwelling-house,  a  good  bearing  orchard,  about  eight 
acres  of  good  meadozv,  and  more  may  be  easily  made, 
forty-five  acres  of  good  timber  land,  the  residue  plough- 
able.  One  third  of  the  purchase  money  to  be  paid  at  the 
time  of  executing  the  deed,  and  easy  payments  may  be  had 
for  the  remainder,  by  giving  good  security  if  required. — 
The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  87,  September  5-12, 
1768. 

New-York,  September  5.  Captain  Pym,  late  Master  of 
the  Ship  Earl  of  Hertford,  of  this  Port,  and  4  of  his  Peo- 
ple, came  up  in  their  Boat  last  Saturday  Evening,  they 
having  left  Capt.  Buck  off  Barnagat,  he  being  scarce  of 
Provisions. 

Monday  last  his  Excellency  WILLIAM  FRANKLIN,  Esq; 
Governor  of  New-Jersey,  arrived  here;  and  on  Saturday 
accompanied  by  the  Hon.  Frederick  Smith,1  and  Captain 
Skinner,2  he  set  out  for  Albany,  in  order  to  attend  a  grand 
Meeting  of  the  Indians  that  is  soon  to  be  at  Fort- Johnson. 

RuN-away  from  the  subscriber,  an  apprentice  lad  named 


1  Frederick  Smyth,  of  Perth  Amboy,  was  Chief  Justice  of  New  Jersey, 
1764-1775. 

2  John   Skinner,   fourth  son   of   the   Rev.   William    Skinner,    of   Perth 
Amboy,  was  a  Lieutenant  in  the  Company  of  his  older  brother,  Captain 
William  Skinner,  in  Col.  Peter  Schuyler's  New  Jersey  Regiment,  in  the 
French  and  Indian  war  of  1755  and  1756,   and  was   taken  prisoner  at 
Oswego  in  the  latter  year.     He  served  in  Lord  Loudon's  Regiment  in 
a  secret  expedition  in  the  Mediterranean,  and  in  the  latter  part  of  1757 
received  a  commission  as  Ensign  in  that  Regiment.     In  1759  he  was  a 
Lieutenant  in  the  Regiment  of  Colonel  Grey,  and  on  June  10,  1768.  was 
commissioned  Captain.     He  was  afterwards   Major  of  the   70th  Regi- 
ment,  which  during  the  Revolution  was  stationed  in  England.     Later 
he  sold  his  commission  and  returned  to  America,  and  engaged  in  mer- 
cantile business  at  Perth  Amboy,  where  he  died  in  December,  1797. — 
Whitehead's  Perth  Amboy,  119. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  267 

JOHN  FOSTER,  born  in  the  Jersies,  about  5  feet  8  inches 
high,  of  a  dark  complexion,  and  pitted  with  the  small-pox, 
wears  his  own  hair  with  a  false  que  to  it;  is  supposed  to 
be  gone  towards  Amboy.  He  took  with  him  a  blue  coat 
and  jacket,  the  coat  bound  with  blue  tape,  and  has  metal 
buttons  studded  with  steel.  Whoever  takes  up  said  ap- 
prentice and  brings  him  to  his  master,  shall  have  FORTY 
SHILLINGS  reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 
me. 

ROBERT  ANDREWS. 

NEW-BRUNSWICK,  Sept.  i,  1768. 
PUBLIC  Notice  is  hereby  given  that  the  Trustees  of 
Queen's  College,  are  to  meet  at  New-Brunswick,  the  first 
Tuesday  in  October  next. 

DAVID  MARINUS,  Clerk. 

To  be  sold  at  public  VENDUE, 

THE  lease  for  a  term  of  years,  of  which  about  42  are 
yet  unexpired,  of  a  house  and  lot  of  ground,  in  the  city  of 
New-Brunswick,  opposite  to  the  Whitehall  Tavern,  50 
feet  in  breadth,  and  103  feet  in  depth,  now  in  the  tenure 
of  John  Collins,  subject  to  a  ground  rent  of  505.  per  an- 
num. 

One  fourth  Part  of  the  Lease  for  a  Term  of  Years,  of 
which  Twenty-eight  are  yet  unexpired,  of  a  House  and 
Lot  in  the  said  City  of  New-Brunswick,  known  by  the 
Name  of  the  Whitehall  Tavern,  Forty-six  Feet  in  Breadth, 
and  One  hundred  and  fifty  Feet  in  Depth,  now  in  the  Ten- 
ure of  Michael  Duff,  subject  to  a  Ground  Rent  of,  Two 
Pounds  Six  Shillings,  per  Annum. 

Also  one  fourth  Part  of  the  Lease,  for  a  Lot  of  Ground 
adjoining  the  former,  of  which  Twenty  two  years  are  un- 
expired; containing  ten  Feet  in  Breadth,  and  One  hun- 


268  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

dred  and  fifty  Feet  in  Depth,  subject  to  a  Ground  Rent  of, 
Ten  Shillings,  per  Annum. 

A  Tract  of  Woodland,  situate  in  the  Corporation  of 
New-Brunswick,  being  Lot,  No.  2.  Part  of  a  larger  Tract, 
consisting  of  several  Lots,  distinguished  on  a  Draught  by 
their  respective  Numbers,  having  a  two  Rod  Road  running 
through  the  said  Tract,  for  the  Conveniency  of  the  said 
Lots,  called  the  Mill-Road,  containing  about  ten  Acres. 

New  Boston  Forge,  situate  at  Roxbury,  in  Morris 
County  on  the  South  Branch  of  Rariton,  together  with  all 
the  Houses,  Water-works,  Buildings,  Improvements,  and 
about  thirty-five  Acres  of  Land  contiguous  thereto. 

Two  Tracts  of  Land  situate  at  Newtown,  in  Sussex 
County,  near  Andover  Iron  Works,  one  Tract  containing 
Thirty-four  Acres,  and  the  other  fifty  Acres,  being  Part 
of  an  undivided  Tract  of  seventy-one  Acres,  mostly  rich 
Bottom. 

A  Tract  of  Wood  Land,  containing  One  hundred  and 
forty-four  Acres,  situate  at  Mendem,  in  Morris  County, 
late  the  Property  of  William  Hagen. 

The  Houses  and  Lots  in  the  City  of  New-Brunswick, 
will  be  sold  at  the  House  of  Mr.  Brooke  Farmer,  in  the 
said  City,  on  Wednesday  the  I4th  of  September,  at  10 
o'Clock  in  the  Morning.  The  Forge  and  the  two  Tracts 
of  Lands,  will  be  sold  at  the  said  Forge,  on  Thursday  the 
1  5th  Day  of  September,  1768,  at  10  o'Clock  in  the  Fore- 
noon; and  the  Tract  of  Woodland,  at  4  o'Clock  in  the 
Afternoon  of  the  same  Day,  at  the  House  of  Mr.  Joseph 
Hinds,  at  the  Sign  of  the  Black  Horse,  in  Mendem  ;  when 
the  Conditions  of  Sale  will  be  made  known.  —  The  New 
York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  879,  September 
5, 


New-York,  September  6.     On  Saturday  Morning  last, 
his  Excellency  Governor  Franklin,  who  arrived  here  a  few 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  269 

Days  ago,  embarked  on  board  a  Sloop  for  Albany,  accom- 
panied by  the  Honorable  Frederic  Smyth,  Esq;  Chief  Jus- 
tice of  New- Jersey,  and  Capt.  John  Skinner,  of  Avnboy, 
in  order  to  be  present  at  the  very  important  Treaty  which 
is  soon  to  be  held  with  the  Indian  Nations,  for  settling  a 
general  Boundary  Line  between  them  and  these  Colonies 
— We  hear  that  the  Treaty  is  to  be  held  at  Fort  Stanwix, 
in  the  Country  of  the  Six  Nations,  about  the  Middle  of 
this  Month,  and  that  a  very  great  Body  of  Indians  are 
expected  to  be  assembled  there  on  this  Occasion. — The 
New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1340,  Sep- 
tember 5,  1768. 

THE  Trustees  of  the  College  of  New-Jersey,  give  No- 
tice to  the  Public,  That  whereas  the  Grammar  School 
which  used  to  be  kept  under  the  Direction  of  the  Presi- 
dent, as  a  Nursery  for  the  College  has  been  discontinued 
for  some  Time,  on  Account  of  the  long  Vacancy  of  that 
Office.  That  the  Chair  being  now  filled  by  the  Arrival  of 
the  Gentleman  last  chosen  from  North-Britain:  The 
School  is  to  be  opened  under  his  Direction,  precisely  on 
the  7th  Day  of  November  next,  being  the  Beginning  of 
the  Winter  Term  in  College.  The  PRESIDENT,  has  already 
provided  a  Person  to  teach  it;  and  has  undertaken  to  the 
Trustees  to  lay  down  a  Plan  of  proceeding  to  the  Teacher, 
to  have  it  under  his  constant  Inspection;  and  take  Care 
that  it  be  conducted  on  the  very  best  Principles.  This  he 
hopes  to  be  able  to  do  with  the  greater  Success,  for  that, 
being  acquainted,  before  he  left  Home,  that  such  a  Thing 
would  be  expected  from  him,  he  took  Care  to  perfect  his 
Scheme,  by  conversing  with  some  of  the  most  eminent 
and  approved  Teachers  in  Great-Britain.  Parents  are  de- 
sired to  take  Notice,  that  their  Children  being  properly 
founded  in  the  Languages,  is  of  the  utmost  Importance  to 


270  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

their  Subsequent  Studies  in  College  being  easy,  pleasant, 
and  successful.  Several  reputable  Housholders  in  Prince- 
ton, have  engaged  to  the  Trustees,  to  take  Boarders  at  as 
cheap  a  Rate,  it  is  presumed,  as  in  any  Town  in  this  Prov- 
ince, where  a  public  Grammar  School  is  taught :  And  if 
the  Parents  of  any  of  the  Children  should  incline  to  have 
them  boarded  in  the  College,  the  Trustees  have  consented 
to  their  being  taken  in  and  supplied  as  the  Scholars  are. 
There  is  a  Terrestrial  Globe  provided  for  the  School,  that 
they  may  be  taught  Geography  at  some  Hours  of  Leisure; 
they  will  also  have  an  Hour  each  Day  appropriated  to 
Writing  and  Arithmetick  without  any  additional  Expence, 
which  it  is  of  Importance  that  they  learn  early.  This  No- 
tice is  given  so  long  before  the  Time  of  opening  School, 
that  Parents  may  have  their  Children  there  seasonably; 
and  it  is  particularly  desired  that  such  as  have  Children 
to  begin  the  Latin,  would  send  them,  if  possible,  upon  the 
very  Day  abovementioned ;  that  they  may  neither  suffer 
any  Loss  themselves,  nor  be  the  Means  of  retarding  others. 
Princeton,  August  25,  1768. 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber  living  in  Shrewsbury, 
a  servant  man  named  Joseph  Compton,  of  a  small  stature, 
about  5  feet  high,  has  a  scar  on  his  instep;  had  on  an  oz- 
naburgs  shirt  and  trowsers,  short  frize  coat,  and  old  bever 
hat  bound  with  ferreting.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures 
said  servant,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall 
be  paid  THREE  POUNDS  reward  by  Stephen  Tallman,  junr. 
— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1340,  September  8,  1768. 

WHEREAS  Christina,  the  Wife  of  George  Millar,  of  Am- 
well  Township,  in  Hunterdon  County,  West  New-Jersey, 
did  elope  from  her  Husband  on  the  5th  Day  of  April  last, 
this  serves  to  forbid  all  Persons  from  trusting  her  on  his 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  271 

Account,  as  he  will  pay  no  Debts  of  her  contracting  from 
that  Date. 

GEORGE  MILLAR 

To  be  sold,  by  public  vendue,  on  Tuesday,  the  I3th  of 
September  inst.  on  the  premises,  about  250  acres  of  very 
good  wheat  land,  situate  in  Readington,  in  the  county  of 
Hunterdon,  and  province  aforesaid.  The  vendue  to  be- 
gin at  twelve  o'clock  of  said  day;  at  which  time  and  place, 
the  conditions  of  sale  will  be  made  known,  and  attendance 
given,  by  THEODORUS  VAN  WYCK,  JOHN  SHIPBOY, 
PETER  PORRINE  and  ABRAHAM  VAN  NESTE,  Assignees. 

TEN  POUNDS  Reward 

ESCAPED  from  the  constables,  some  weeks  ago,  the  fol- 
lowing persons,  viz.  ANDREW  CRAWFORD,  late  from  Ire- 
land, about  25  years  old,  five  feet  eleven  inches  high,  stoop- 
shouldered,  pockpitted,  pale-faced,  has  black  hair,  tied  be- 
hind, his  cloathing  uncertain.  ROBERT  SCOTT,  24  years 
old,  5  feet  9  inches  high,  full-faced,  pockpitted,  has  light 
brown  hair;  *both  apt  to  swear,  and  get  drunk,  and  very 
quarrelsome;  they  generally  make  their  home  at  one  Rals- 
ton's  near  Newark.  Whoever  secures  said  fellows,  and 
delivers  them  to  Joseph  Thomas,  Goalkeeper,  for  Chester 
county,  shall  be  intitled  to  the  above  reward,  or  Six  Pounds 
for  Crawford,  and  Four  for  Scott,  paid  by 

JOSEPH  THOMAS,  Goaler. 

Newcastle  County,  July  20,  1768. 
WHEREAS  a  certain  RICHARD  CAYFORD  of  Bridgetown, 
in  Cumberland  county,  and  province  of  New- Jersey,  rope- 
maker,  hath  obtained  an  obligation,  dated  on  or  about  the 
nth  day  of  this  instant  month,  from  me  the  subscriber, 
in  the  penalty  of  Forty  Pounds,  conditioned  for  the  pay- 


272  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

ment  of  Twenty  Pounds,  or  the  delivery  of  a  yoke  of 
oxen,  at  the  house  of  Peter  Alrichs  at  Reedy-Island,  on 
the  nth  or  I4th  days  of  August  next,  in  a  deceitful  man- 
ner, arid  without  any  consideration  in  law.  These  are  to 
notify  and  desire  all  persons  whatsoever,  not  to  take  an 
assignment  of  the  said  obligation,  as  I  am  determined  not 
to*  pay  the  same,  unless  thereto  compelled  by  law. 

THOMAS  COLLINS. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2072,  September 
8,  1768." 

TRENTON   RACES. 
A  Purse  of  THIRTY  POUNDS, 

To  BE  RUN  FOR  on  THURSDAY,  the  22d  instant,  Septem- 
ber, at  TRENTON,  New  Jersey,  free  for  any  half  blooded 
horse,  mare  or  gelding  carrying  ten  stone,  Mr.  Morris's 
mare  Strumpet  excepted,  the  purse  to  be  won  by  the  best 
horse  in  three  two  mile  heats,  proper  judges  to  be  appoint- 
ed. 

The  next  day  the  ENTRANCE  MONEY  to  be  run  for;  a 
saddle  of  five  pounds  value  to  be  purchased  with  part  or 
the  whole  thereof. 

Running  horses  to  be  entered  with  Mr.  Pontius  Stille. 
at  Trenton  ferry,  two  days  before  the  purse  is  run  for,  or 
Three  Pounds  at  the  Post. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal, 
No.  1344,  September  8,  1768. 

There  are.  I  believe,  few  men  who  indulge  a  scribbling 
vein,  but  have  reason,  at  some  time  or  other  to  repent  it; 
I  frankly  own  this  is  at  present  my  case.  In  a  spirit  of 
greater  volatility  than  judgment,  I  at  first  wrote  the  piece 
signed  Ironicus  Bombasticus,  which  I  was  convinced  of, 
on  reading  the  Farmer's  second  letter,  and  candidly  ac- 
knowledged it  to  the  public;  here  I  thought  myself  clear, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  273 

and  imagined  the  matter  would  have  rested ;  but  on  seeing 
the  piece  signed  Satiricus  Sarcasticus,  which  reflected  on 
a  Gentleman  of  character  in  New-Jersey,  common  justice 
demanded  my  appearance  to  wipe  off  the  aspersions  cast 
on  him  by  that  writer,  and  I  delared  him  totally  ignorant 
of  the  piece;  which  defence  I  immediately  conveyed  to 
the  printer  of  the  Chronicle,  and  at  the  same  time  wrote 
the  two  short  notes  A.  B.  C.  addressed  to  the  printers  of 
the  Gazette  and  Journal,  which  notes,  though  intended  to 
be  sent  that  evening,  were  neglected,  and  not  delivered 
till  a  considerable  time  after;  their  appearing  in  public 
was  entirely  without  my  knowledge,  as  I  rather  expected 
a  re-publication  of  the  defence  requested  from  the  Chron- 
icle; yet  when  I  found  myself  the  innocent  cause  of  in- 
jurious charges  against  the  printers  of  the  Journal  and 
Gazette,  the  same  sentiments  which  before  urged  me  to 
appear  in  defence  of  the  Jersey  Gentleman  prompted  me 
to  make  a  confession  of  my  real  name  to  the  printers,  as  I 
could  conceive  no  other  effectual  method  of  exculpating 
them  from  the  charge  of  "forgery."  The  part  I  have  act- 
ed in  this  whole  affair  has  been  dictated  by  candour,  and 
I  must  own,  I  did  not  expect  such  ungenteel  treatment 
from  a  person  ASSUMING  the  character  of  Plain  Truth. 
IRONICUS  BOMBASTICUS. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  TRACT  OF  LAND,  situate  in  Sussex  county,  in  the 
western  division  of  the  province  of  New-Jersey,  on  a 
branch  of  Delaware,  called  Pohatkung,  containing  1220 
acres,  with  the  usual  allowance  for  high-ways,  well 
watered  and  well  timbered,  having  a  stream  running 
through  the  whole,  sufficient  for  a  saw  mill,  grist-mill,  or 
iron-works,  and  divers  small  streams  issuing  out  of  the 
mountains  on  both  sides,  convenient  for  watering  the  low 
lands  for  meadow,  a  large  quantity  of  which  may  be  made 

18 


274  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

on  the  tract.  The  title  indisputable.  —  About  60  miles 
from  Philadelphia,  and  about  the  same  distance  from 
New-  York,  which  will  be  sold  either  all  together  or  in 
parcels,  as  may  best  suit  the  purchasers,  and  credit  given 
for  one  half  of  the  purchase  money,  paying  interest  for 
the  same.  For  further  particulars  apply  to  the  subscriber, 
at  Haddonfield,  in  Gloucester  county. 

ISAAC  ANDREWS. 

—  The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  88,  September 
12-19, 


New-York,  September  15.  Friday  last  Dr.  Wether- 
spoon,  President  of  Nassau-Hall,  in  New-Jersey,  arrived 
here  from  Prince-Town. 

Wanted,  at  Ringwood  Iron-  Works, 

In  the  JERSIES, 

SOBER  Men,  that  understand  driving  a  Horse  Team; 
any  such,  of  good  Character,  will  meet  with  Employment, 
in  that  way,  by  applying  as  above. 

Public  Notice  is  hereby  given, 

THAT  a  STAGE  WAGGON  will  be  erected  in  Hackinsack, 
at  the  New-Bridge,  to  set  out  for  Powles-Hook,  on  the 
Morning  of  the  I7th  of  this  Inst.  September.  Good  at- 
tendance will  be  given,  and  necessary  provision  made  for 
the  accommodation  of  passengers  ;  to  go  twice  a  week,  on 
Tuesday's  and  Saturday's;  to  set  out  at  six  in  the  morn- 
ing from  said  New-Bridge,  and  at  seven  from  the  town 
of  Hackinsack,  and  will  return  on  the  same  day,  setting 
out  precisely  at  two  o'clock  in  the  afternoon  from  Powles- 
Hook;  the  price  for  each  passenger  is  2s.  6d.  As  it  will 
be  erected  for  the  conveniency  of  the  public,  it  is  hoped 
they  will  encourage  the  design  of  the 

Public's  humble  Servant, 

ANDREW  VAN  BUSKIRK. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  275 

I^IPTHE  Sum  of  £.  600  is  wanted  on  a  good  Farm,  in 
the  Jersies,  that  cost  £.  800  but  a  short  time  since.  For 
farther  Particulars,  enquire  of  H.  Gaine. — The  New  York 
Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  880,  September  12, 
1768. 

ALL  Persons  indebted  to  the  Estate  of  Mr.  JOHN  WAT- 
SON, late  of  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy,  Merchant,  deceased, 
either  by  Bond  or  Bill,  are  requested  to  pay  off  their  Inter- 
est due  thereon,  on  or  before  the  loth  Day  of  October  next, 
otherwise  they  may  depend  on  their  being  put  in  Suit, 
without  any  farther  Notice  or  respect  to  Persons.  And  all 
those  that  have  any  just  Demands  on  the  said  Estate,  are 
requested  to  bring  them  in,  in  order  that  they  may  be 
finally  discharged. 

ALEXANDER  WATSON,  Executor. 

WHEREAS  the  Sale  of  the  Lands  and  real  Estate,  be- 
longing to  Christian  Syberberg,  situate  at  Bridgewater,  in 
the  County  of  Somerset,  and  Province  of  New-Jersey, 
adjoining  upon  Alamatunk  River,  which  was  taken  in  Ex- 
ecution at  the  Suit  of  Daniel  Wistar  and  Thomas  Bartow, 
jun.  and  others,  having  been  adjourned  for  the  Want  of 
Buyers,  from  the  Day  which  was  heretofore  advertised 
agreeable  to  Law  for  the  Sale  thereof,  Notice  is  hereby 
given,  that  the  same  will  be  exposed  to  Sale  by  way  of 
publick  Vendue,  on  the  Premises,  on  Tuesday  the  2Oth  of 
September  next,  between  the  Hours  of  12  and  5  o'clock, 
at  which  Time  and  Place,  all  such  Persons  as  are  desirous 
of  purchasing,  are  desired  to  attend  accordingly;  and 
those  who  have  Mortgages,  are  requested  to  bring  them 
in. 

August  4,  1768.  JOB  STOCKTON,  late  Sheriff. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1341,  September  12,  1768. 

\ 


276  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

PHILADELPHIA,  September  15. 
Since  our  last  Captain  Newbold  arrived  here  in  24  Days 

from  Tortola On  the  3ist  ult,  in  Lat.  33,  Long. 

66,  he  spoke  a  Schooner  from  Virginia,  that  had  been  22 
Days  out,  had  lost  her  Mainmast  in  a  hard  Gale  of  Wind, 
the  Day  after  she  left  the  Capes,  and  was  then  standing 
for  Bermuda  to  refit;  the  Master's  Name  unknown. 

Trenton,  August  31,  1768. 

To  be  SOLD  at  public  vendue,  to  the  highest  bidder,  on 
Friday  the  3Oth  day  of  September  next,  on  the  premises, 
between  the  hours  of  12  and  5  o'clock  in  the  afternoon. 

THE  noted  TAVERN-HOUSE,  and  sixty  acres  of  land, 
beside  allowance,  situate  at  the  foot  of  Robin's  hill,  in  Am- 
well;  there  is  a  good  bearing  orchard,  barn,  store-house 
and  other  necessary  buildings;  the  mansion-house  large, 
almost  new,  and  well  situated  either  for  tavern  or  store; 
late  the  property  of  Daniel  Robins,  deceased,  seized  and 
taken  in  execution  at  the  suit  of  James  Benezet,  Townsend 
White,  Jeremiah  Warder,  and  others,  and  to  be  sold  again, 
as  the  first  purchaser  has  not  complied  with  the  conditions 
of  the  first  vendue,  by 

SAMUEL  TUCKER,  late  Sheriff. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  public  vendue,  on  Second  Day,  the  third 

of  October  next, 

ALL  those  two  plantations  late  the  estate  of  Daniel 
Kingston,  deceased,  now  in  the  tenure  of  Richard  Tyse, 
and  John  Huntzinger,  situate  on  Timber  Creek,  in  the 
county  of  Gloucester.  The  former  of  which  contains  320 
acres  of  plough-land,  and  about  50  acres  of  meadow  land, 
with  a  good  dwelling-house,  orchard,  and  barn.  The  un- 
cleared land  (of  which  there  are  about  250  acres)  very 
well  timbered  and  watered.  The  other  contains  227  acres; 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  277 

has  on  it  two  dwelling-houses,  a  good  orchard  and  garden; 
about  IQO  acres  of  land  cleared  (with  some  meadow)  the 
rest  well  watered  and  timbered.  The  title  to  both  indis- 
putable, and  their  situation  very  handy  to  navigable  water, 
and  about  7  miles  distant  by  land  from  Gloucester.  The 
conditions  of  the  sale  to  be,  one  half  of  the  money  paid 
down  at  executing  the  deed,  and  the  remaining  half  in  12 
months,  with  security,  if  required.  Attendance  will  be 
given  at  the  Widow  Davis' s,  on  Timber  Creek,  near  the 
premises,  at  which  place  the  vendue  will  be  held,  by 

ISRAEL  MORRIS,  Son  Wm. 
Attorney  in  fact  to  John  Kingston 

Trenton,  September  8,  1768. 

LEFT  at  the  subscriber's  store,  some  time  ago,  a  small 
bundle,  containing  one  piece  of  long  lawn,  half  a  piece  of 
spotted  ditto,  &c.  Any  person  proving  their  right,  and 
paying  charges,  may  have  them,  or  their  value,  by  apply- 
ing to 

FURMAN  and  HUNT. 

To  BE  LETT, 

For  a  term  of  years,  and  may  be  entered  on  immedi- 
ately, A  COMMODIOUS  BRICK  HOUSE,  situated  at  a  village, 
called  the  New-Mills,  about  6  miles  distant  from  Mount- 
holly,  in  Burlington  county.  There  will  be  lett  with  the 
said  house,  a  large  garden,  a  clover  lot,  of  i  acre  and  a 
half,  adjoining  the  garden,  a  lot  of  meadow,  of  about  two 
acres,  within  forty  rod  of  said  premises  and  another  lot 
of  ground,  within  twenty  rod  thereof;  the  said  premises 
will  be  very  suitable  for  a  shopkeeper,  and  to  carry  on  the 
pork  trade,  as  there  are  large  convenient  cellars  and  stores, 
and  other  convenient  out-houses,  such  as  stable,  hay- 
house,  chair-house,  &c.  Any  person  inclining  to  rent  the 


278  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

same,  may  apply  to  the  subscriber,  living  near  the  prem- 
ises, and  know  the  terms. 

WILLIAM  BUDD,  junior. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2073,  September 
15,  1768. 

New- York,  September  12. 

Saturday  last  his  Majesty's  ship  Fowey,  Capt.  Tillet, 
commander,  arrived  at  Sandy-Hook  from  South  Caro- 
lina, and  we  hear  she  is  soon  to  sail  for  Boston:  The 
Viper  sailed  for  Halifax  Thursday  last. 

New- York,  September  12. 

Friday  last  Dr.  Wetherspoon,  President  of  Nassau-hall, 
in  New-Jersey,  arrived  here  from  Princeton. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Journal,  No.  1345,  September  15,  1768. 

Woodbridge,  September  12,  1768. 
BROKE  out  of  Gaol  at  Perth-Amboy,  on  the  Qth  Instant, 
a  Mulatto  Servant  Man  named  Charles  Lee,  born  in  Eng- 
land, about  5  feet  9  inches  high,  slim  built,  has  a  Scar  on 
one  side  of  his  nose,  and^  wears  his  own  hair;  had  on  a 
light  coloured  silk  Jacket  and  an  old  felt  hat;  he  had  run 
away  from  Maryland,  and  was  taken  up  and  committed 
to  said  Gaol.  He  is  a  watch  maker  by  trade;  and  as  he 
has  been  in  the  provincial  service,  it  is  supposed  he  is  gone 
towards  Albany.  Whoever  takes  up  said  Servant,  and 
secures  him  in  any  Jail,  or  brings  him  to  the  Subscriber 
in  Woodbridge,  shall  have  Seven  Pounds  Reward,  and  all 
reasonable  Charges,  paid  by 

NATHANIEL  HEARD. 

Perth- Amboy,  September  10,  1768. 
BY  Order  of  Stephen  Skinner,  Rune  Runyon  and  Jon- 
athan Frazee,  Esqrs.  Judges  of  the  inferior  Court  of  Com- 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  279 

mon-pleas  for  the  County  of  Middlesex,  in  the  Province 
of  New- Jersey;  Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  Creditor  or 
Creditors  respectively  of  Sohjer  Morrel  and  Richard 
Matchet,  insolvent  Debtors  in  the  Gaol  of  the  said  County 
of  Middlesex,  to  shew  Cause,  if  any  they  have,  before  the 
said  Judges,  at  the  House  of  Elijah  Dunham,  Inn  holder, 
in  the  City  of  Perth- Amboy,  in  the  County  of  Middlesex 
aforesaid,  on  Wednesday  the  I2th  of  November  next, 
why  an  Assignment  of  the  said  Debtors'  Estates  respect- 
ively, should  not  be  made,  and  the  Debtors  discharged, 
pursuant  to  the  Directions  of  a  late  Act  of  the  Governor, 
Council  and  General  Assembly  of  this  Province,  entitled, 
An  Act  for  the  Relief  of  insolvent  Debtors. — The  New 
York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1342,  September 
19,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  September  22. 

On  Wednesday  next  the  Anniversary  Commencement 
of  the  New- Jersey  COLLEGE  will  be  held  in  the  Church 
at  Princetown.  The  exercises  of  the  Day  will  begin  at 
Ten  o'Clock. 

Gloucester,  September  17,  1768. 

WE,  the  subscribers,  prisoners,  confined  in  the  goal  of 
the  county  of  Gloucester  for  debt,  give  this  public  notice 
to  our  several  creditors,  to  meet  at  the  house  of  William 
Hugg,  Innkeeper,  in  the  town  of  Gloucester,  on  Saturday, 
the  8th  day  of  October  next,  at  ten  of  the  clock  in  the 
forenoon,  to  shew  cause,  if  any  they  have,  why  an  assign- 
ment of  our  estates  should  not  be  made,  and  we  discharged 
from  confinement,  pursuant  to  an  act  of  general  assembly 
of  the  province  of  New-Jersey,  entituled,  an  act  for  the 
relief  of  insolvent  debtors. 

ABRAHAM  COXE,     DAVID  COCHRAN. 


280          NEW  JERSEY  COLONIAL  DOCUMENTS.       [1768 

WANTED 

A  FULLER  or  SHEERMAN.  Enquire  of  HUGH  CREIGH- 
TON,  at  the  Indian  King,  in  Haddonfield,  7  miles  from 
Philadelphia. 

Just  published,  and  to  be  sold  by  HALL  and  SELLERS,  at 
the  New  Printing-Office,  in  Market-street,  Philadelphia. 

POOR  Richard's  Almanack  for  the  Year  1769;  contain- 
ing besides  the  usual  Astronomical  Calculations,  Extracts 
from  some  of  the  best  Authors  on  the  planting  and  culti- 
vating Vines  and  the  Process  of  making  Wine;  wherein 
are  shewn,  the  Soil  and  Situation  that  is  best  adapted  for 
Vineyards,  and  the  Manner  of  clearing  and  preparing  the 
Ground  for  them ;  the  Distance  the  Vines  should  be  plant- 
ed from  each  other;  the  Cuttings  from  Vines,  which  it 
is  thought  would  thrive  well  in  Pennsylvania,  New- Jersey, 
New- York,  and  the  Province  of  Massachusetts;  also 
those  that  will  suit  the  Southern  Provinces;  Directions 
for  the  Management  of  the  Cuttings,  from  the  Time  of 
Planting  till  they  come  to  a  bearing  State,  and  how  they 
are  to  be  managed  in  that  State,  etc,  etc. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette,  No.  2074,  September  22,  1768. 

New- York,  September  19. 

We  have  melancholy  accounts  from  all  the  country, 
within  many  miles  of  this  city,  of  the  great  drought  now 
prevailing;  that  the  grass  is  so  dried  up,  that  some  already 
begin  to  fodder  their  cattle;  and  we  also  hear  it  has  been 
so  cold  a  few  days  past,  as  to  have  a  considerable  frost  at 
Newark. 

Capt.  Leech  from  London,  spoke  with  the  following 

vessels,  viz And,  the  4th  of  September,  in  lat. 

34.24,  long.  59.20.  a  schooner  from  Piscataway,  bound 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  28 1 

for  St.  Christophers,  commanded  by  Monsieur  Bunbury, 
nine  days  out. 

WHEREAS  GEORGE  AKERS,  Tinman,  of  London,  Brother 
to  Elizabeth  Cross,  of  George  Yard,  Shoreditch,  left  Eng- 
land about  14  or  15  years  ago,  and  in  the  year  1761  was  at 
Princetown,  New- Jersey,  and  in  1766  was  heard  from  at 
Lancaster,  in  Pennnsylvania,  since  which  he  has  not  been 
heard  of.  If  he  is  living,  and  will  apply  to  Capt.  Spain, 
Commander  of  the  snow  Sally,  in  Philadelphia,  he  will 
hear  of  something  to  his  advantage. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal,  No.  1346,  September  22,  1768. 

BILLS  of  EXCHANGE,  on  AMSTERDAM,  undoubtedly 
good,  may  be  had  from  One  to  Five  Thousand  Guilders 
and  upwards.  Inquire  of  WILLIAM  OAKE,  Esq;  at  New 
Brunswick,  in  New-Jersey. — The  Pennsylvania  Chron- 
icle, No.  90,  September  26-October  3,  1768. 

Pursuant  to  an  order  of  the  Honourable  Charles  Read, 
and  John  Berrien,  Esqrs.  two  of  the  judges  of  the  supreme 
court  of  judicature,  for  the  province  of  New- Jersey;  No- 
tice is  hereby  given  to  the  respective  creditors  of  Samuel 
Mun,  and  Matthias  Knight,  insolvent  debtors,  in  the  goal 
of  the  county  of  Morris,  that  they  be  and  appear  on  Wed- 
nesday the  Qth  day  of  November  next,  at  the  Court-House 
in  the  county  of  Burlington,  at  12  o'clock  of  the  same  day, 
to  shew  cause,  (if  any  they  have)  why  the  said  debtors 
should  not  be  discharged  agreeable  to  a  late  act  of  the 
legislature  o<f  the  said  province,  for  the  relief  of  insolvent 
debtors. 

Morris-Town,  Nezv- Jersey,  September  21,  1768. 

PURSUANT  to  an  order  of  the  Honourable  Jacob  Ford, 
and  Samuel  Tuttill,  Esqrs,  two  of  the  judges  of  the  infer- 
ior court  of  common  pleas,  for  the  county  of  Morris ;  No- 


282  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

tice  is  hereby  given  to  the  creditors  of  Hannah  Vander- 
hoof,  an  insolvent  debtor,  in  the  goal  of  the  said  county 
of  Morris,  that  they  be  and  appear  on  Monday  the  24th 
day  of  October  next,  at  two  o'clock  of  the  same  day,  at 
the  Court-House  in  Morris-Town,  in  the  county  of  Mor- 
ris, to  shew  cause  (if  any  they  have)  why  the  said  Han- 
nah Vanderhoof,  should  not  be  discharged,  agreeable  to  a 
late  act  of  the  governor,  council,  and  general-assembly  of 
the  province  of  New- Jersey,  passed  at  Perth-Amboy,  in 
the  8th  year  of  his  Majesty's  reign,  entitled,  "An  act  for 
the  relief  of  insolvent  debtors." 

Morris-Town,  New- Jersey,  September  21,  1768. 

The  PUBLIC  are  advertised, 

THAT  the  Administrators  of  the  Estate  of  Samuel 
Woodruff,  Esq;  deceased,  have  adjourned  the  Vendue, 
unto  Tuesday  the  4th  of  October,  when  the  Remainder  of 
the  moveable  Estate  will  be  sold,  consisting  of  two  large 
Boats,  in  good  Trim,  a  large  Anchor  and  Cable,  a  neat 
singing  Clock,  Currant  Wine,  a  stout  Farm  Negro  Man, 
Houshold  Furniture,  &c  &c. 

The  Vendue  to  begin  at  i  o' Clock  of  the  said  Day,  when 
the  easy  Terms  of  Payment  will  be  made  known,  by 
ELIZABETH  WOODRUFF  Administratrix. 
BENJAMIN  WOODRUFF      ) 
JOSEPH  WOODRUFF,  Jun.   >  Administrators 
And  Isaac  Woodruff.         ) 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
882,  September  26,  1768. 

New-York,  September  26.  On  Wednesday  next  the 
Anniversary  Commencement  of  the  New-Jersey  COLLEGE 
will  be  held  at  the  Church  at  Prince  town.  The  Exercises 
of  the  Day  will  begin  at  Ten  o' Clock.— The  New  York 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  283 

Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1343,  September  26, 
1768. 

MADE  his  escape  from  Gloucester  county  goal,  on  the 
1 8th  instant,  a  certain  HENRY  BIDDLE,  about  45  years  of 
age,  5  feet  10  inches  high;  slim  made,  of  a  dark  complex- 
ion, strait  hair,  and  has  a  sour  look;  had  on  an  old  brown 
bearskin  jacket,  ozenbrigs  shirt  and  trowsers,  old  shoes, 
tied  with  strings,  and  an  old  felt  hat.  Whoever  takes  up 
said  BIDDLE,  and  brings  him  to  Gloucester  goal,  shall  have 
Forty  Shillings  reward;  or  if  secured  in  any  other  goal, 
so  as  he  may  be  had  again,  Twenty  Shillings,  paid  by 
JOSIAH  CHATTIN,  Goaler. 

We  hear  from  Burlington,  that  lately  departed  this  Life, 
universally  beloved,  the  Widow  ELIZABETH  POLEGREEN, 
aged  Seventy-two  Years.  She  died  in  the  same 

House  in  which  she  was  born.  And,  a  few  Miles  out  of 
the  said  City,  on  the  25th  Instant,  JOHN  BUTCHER,  a  rep- 
utable Farmer,  died  at  the  Age  of  Fourscore,  being  born 
about  the  very  Time  of  the  blessed  Revolution  in  England. 

On  the  27th  of  October  next  will  be  exposed  to  sale,  by 
public  vendue,  on  the  premises  1 1  lots  of  cedar  swamp  and 
pine  land,  formerly  belonging  to  JONATHAN  WRIGHT  and 
known  by  the  name  of  Wright's  Swamp,  situate  in  the 
county  of  Gloucester,  about  14  miles  from  Haddonfield, 
12  from  Timber-creek  Landing,  and  20  miles  from  Phil- 
adelphia. The  lots  contain  from  14  to  45  acres,  the  great- 
est part  of  which  is  exceeding  fine  timber,  fit  to  work  into 
shingles,  boards,  &c.  and  its  situation  exceeds  swamps  in 
general,  being  naturally  very  wet,  which  is  a  great  safe- 
guard from  fire:  and  as  each  lot  will  have  the  advantage 
of  two  fronts,  and  the  fast  land  comes  near  the  swamp  on 
both  sides,  renders  it  more  convenient  to  get  the  timber. 


284  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

The  lots  are  all  numbered  and  marked.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  view  them,  by  applying  to  HENRY  THORN,  Inn- 
keeper at  Longcoming,  may  have  the  opportunity  of  see- 
ing them.  Those  who  incline  to  become  purchasers,  are 
desired  to  meet  at  the  house  of  the  aforsaid  Thorn  on  the 
day  of  sale,  at  ten  o'clock  in  the  forenoon,  in  order  to  pro- 
ceed to  the  swamp.  The  conditions  of  the  vendue,  and 
the  plan  of  the  lots,  will  be  shewn  on  the  day  of  sale,  and 
attendance  given  by 

WILLIAM  HULINGS,  and  THOMAS  PRYOR,  junior. 
N.  B.    The  quantity  of  swamp  in  each  lot  will  be  ascer- 
tained before  the  sale. 

THREE  POUNDS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  his  bail,  living  in  Salem,  a  certain 
Joseph  Hanes,  born  in  England,  is  about  25  years  of  age, 
5  feet  7  or  8  inches  high,  of  a  brown  complexion,  with 
black  hair,  tied;  had  on,  when  he  went  away,  a  snuff- 
coloured  cotton  velvet  vest,  without  sleeves  or  pocket-flaps, 
check  trowsers,  high  quartered  calf-skin  pumps,  silver 
buckles,  and  thread  stockings.  It  is  supposed  he  has  plenty 
of  money;  he  sings  a  good  song,  and  is  much  given  to 
liquor.  As  he  can  write,  it  is  probable  he  may  forge  a 
pass.  Whoever  secures  said  Hanes,  in  any  of  his  Majes- 
ty's goals,  so  that  his  bail  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
the  above  reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by  me 

EDWARD  TEST 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him 
off  at  their  peril. 

Cumberland  County,  West  New- Jersey, 

September  19,  1768. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  on  the  first  Tuesday  in 
November,  the  subscriber's  STAGE- WAGGON  will  set  out 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  285 

from  his  house,  near  the  Cross  Roads,  in  Stow-creek  town- 
ship (about  5  miles  from  Greenwich,  and  near  the  same 
distance  from  Bridgetown)  to  William  Cooper's  ferry, 
and  return  the  Thursday  following,  and  so  continue  week- 
ly; the  price  for  passengers  three  half  pence  a  mile  each, 
and  four  shillings  and  sixpence  per  hundred  weight  for 
goods,  carried  the  whole  distance.  Those  who  please  to 
employ  him,  may  depend  on  good  usage,  and  the  utmost 
care  taken,  by  their  humble  servant 

WILLIAM  SHUTT 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2075,  September 
29,  1768. 

WAS  stolen  out  of  the  pasture  of  Samuel  Jaques,  sen. 
in  Woodbridge,  on  Wednesday  morning,  before  day,  a 
lightish  brown  horse,  about  14  hands  and  a  half  high,  low 
in  flesh,  flat  sided,  with  a  white  star  and  snip,  has  been 
stifled,  has  a  white  garter  above  the  gambril,  occasioned 
by  wearing  a  strap,  and  is  still  lame  on  his  first  being  used. 
Also  a  saddle,  almost  new,  a  bridle,  black  leather  reins, 
and  curb  bits;  likewise  a  great  coat,  of  lightish  bearskin, 
with  basket  buttons,  button-holes  and  coat  all  bound  with 
ferreting;  also  a  pair  of  boots,  with  a  spur  piece  from  the 
heel  almost  to  the  top — Stolen  by  a  person  who  calls  him- 
self Richard  Howard,  says  he  was  born  in  Philadelphia, 
has  been  some  time  on  board  a  man  of  war,  and  pretends 
to  be  a  weaver :  Had  on  when  he  stole  the  above  articles, 
a  castor  hat,  blue  turn'd  homespun  coat,  black  and  blue 
homespun  vest,  slash  sleeves,  lined  with  flannel,  made 
sailor  fashion,  with  horn  buttons,  a  striped  holland  lap- 
elled  vest,  long  striped  trowsers,  and  woollen  stockings, 
common  shoes,  with  brass  buckles.  He  is  about  5  feet  8 
inches  high,  has  black  curled  hair,  round  shouldered,  long 
chin,  light  beard,  raw  boned,  and  thick  spoken.  Whoever 


286  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

takes  up  said  thief,  and  confines  him  in  any  of  his  Maj- 
esty's goals,  so  that  he  may  be  brought  to  justice,  and  the 
horse,  &c.  returned,  shall  have  Ten  Pounds  reward  for 
their  service  and  expence;  for  the  horse  without  the  thief 
Three  Pounds;  for  the  thief  without  the  horse,  &c.  Five 
Pounds,  money  at  Eight  Shillings  the  oz.  to  be  paid  by 
Woodbridge,  October  5.  SAMUEL  JAQUES. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  91,  October  3-10, 
1768. 

TAKEN-UP  a  few  Days  ago,  and  committed  to  the  Goal 
of  the  Borough  of  Elizabeth,  in  NewTjersey,  by  order  of 
John  Stites,  Esq;  Mayor,  a  Negro  Man  about  24  Years 
old,  very  thick  Lips,  talks  both  Dutch  and  English,  says 
he  is  a  free  Man,  and  that  he  lived  some  Time  at  Bloom- 
ingdale,  near  New- York:  When  taken  up  he  had  on  a 
blue  Cloth  Coat,  old  Shoes,  without  Stockings.  The  Own- 
er may  have  him  again,  paying  Charges,  and  proving  his 
Property,  by  applying  to  the  said  John  Stites,  Esq;  or  the 
Coaler,  Benjamin  Miller. — The  New  York  Gazette  and 
Weekly  Mercury,  No.  883  October  3,  1768. 

Princeton,  September  28.  This  Day  being  the  Anni- 
versary Commencement  of  the  College  of  New-Jersey, 
after  the  usual  Procession,  the  Exercises  of  the  Day  were 
opened  by  the  President,  the  Revd.  Dr.  Wither  spoon,  with 
a  learned  and  elegant  Latin  Oration,  on  the  Connection 
and  mutual  Influence  of  Learning  and  Piety. 

After  which  Mr.  Edwards,  pronounced  a  spiritual  Sal- 
utatory Oration  in  Latin,  on  Civil  Liberty. 

The  following  Theses  were  then  defended  to  general 
Acceptation. 

Quicunque  vere  pii  sunt,  prae  omnibus  aliis  idoireo  in 
honore  habere  debemus. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  287 

It  is  the  Interest  of  any  Nation,  to  have  the  Trade  of 
it's  new  Countries,  as  free  from  Embarrassments  as  pos- 
sible. 

The  Exercises  of  the  Morning  were  concluded  by  Mr. 
Blackwell,  with  a  judicious  Harangue  on  Genius. 

In  the  Afternoon  the  following  Theses  were  defended : 

Nequitia  ipsa  non  obstante,  eos,  qui  nobis  in  republica 
proepositi  sunt,  vel  qui  aliquod  civile  Munus  exequntur, 
venerari  debemus. 

It  is  lawful  for  every  Man,  and  in  many  Cases,  his  in- 
dispensable Duty,  to  hazard  his  Life  in  defence  of  his  Civil 
Liberty. 

Next  to  these  Mr.  Davies,  a  Candidate  for  the  Master's 
Degree,  pronounced  an  animated  Latin  Oration  on  Lib- 
erty. 

To  this  succeeded  a  very  Emphatical  Exhibition  on 
true  Greatness,  by  Mr.  Rush. 

The  Revd.  John  Blair,  Professor  of  Divinity,  then  de- 
livered a  judicious  Discourse  on  the  Importance  of  that 
Office  in  an  Institution  of  Learning. 

The  Degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  was  then  conferred  on 
the  following  young  Gentlemen :  Robert  Blackwell,  Elias 
Van  Bunschooten,  Ephraim  Brevard,  John  Culbertson, 
Pierpoint  Edwards,  William  C,  Houston,  Adlai  Osborne, 
Thomas  Rees,  Michael  Sebring,  Thomas  Smith,  Isaac 
Story.1 

i  Robert  Blackwell,  son  of  Jacob  Francis  Blackwell,  of  Long-  Island 
New  York,  was  born  May  6,  1748.  After  his  graduation  he  studied  for 
the  ministry,  and  on  June  11,  1772,  he  was  ordained  a  Deacon  in  the 
chapel  of  Fulham  Palace,  near  London,  by  Bishop  Richard  Terrick, 
and  subsequently  to  the  order  of  the  priesthood.  Returning-  to  Amer- 
ica, he  was  stationed  in  the  southern  part  of  New  Jersey  as  a  mission- 
ary of  the  Society  for  the  Propagation  of  the  Gospel  in  Foreign  Parts, 
officiating1  at  Gloucester  and  Waterford,  and  at  Greenwich.  In  the 
war  of  the  Revolution  he  served  as  Chaplain  to  the  First  Pennsylvania 
Brigade,  and  Surgeon  to  one  of  the  regiments  in  the  year  1778.  In  1781 
lie  was  called  to  be  one  of  the  assistant  ministers  of  Christ  church  and 
St.  Peter's,  Philadelphia,  where  he  served  until  1811.  He  died  Feb  12 
1!<31 

Elias  Van  Bunschooten  was  born  Oct.  26,  1738,  at  New  Hackensack, 
Dutchess  county,  N.  Y.,  son  of  Teunis  Van  Bunschoten.  After  gradu- 
ating from  Princeton  College  in  1768  he  studied  for  the  ministry  with 
the  Rev.  Dr.  Myer,  was  licensed  in  1773,  and  in  the  same  year  was 


288  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

The  Degree  of  Master  of  Arts,  was  conferred  on  the 
following  Gentlemen  :  Jacob  Van  Arsdalen,  John  Bacon, 
Joel  Benedict,  William  Davies,  Jonathan  Edwards,  Rob- 
ert Halstead,  Robert  Ogden,  Ebenezer  Pemberton,  Jacob 
Rush,  Stephen  Voorhees,  Alexander  Miller,  James  Tuttle; 
Alexander  Sears  Hill,  A.  M.  of  Harvard-College,  was  ad- 
mitted ad  lundem. 

Hugh  Sim,  of  Scotland,  was  admitted  to  the  honorary 
Degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 

The  Exercises  of  the  Day  were  concluded  with  an  ele- 
gant Valedictory  Oration  on  Patriotism,  delivered  by  Mr. 
Story. 

settled  over  the  Reformed  Dutch  church  at  Schaghticoke,  on  the  Hud- 
son, where  he  labored  until  1785,  when  he  resignd.  On  the  29th  of 
August  of  the  same  year  he  was  installed  over  three  churches — Mini- 
sink,  Magaghamack  (near  the  persent  Port  Jervis),  and  Walpack,  cov- 
ering fifty  miles  of  territory — in  Orange  county,  New  York.  In  1792  he 
gathered  an  additional  church  at  the  Clove,  now  Port  Jervis,  where 
he  resided  until  1812,  when,  on  account  of  the  infirmities  of  age,  he 
withdrew  from  active  duties.  He  died  Jan.  10,  1815.  He  was  in  person 
about  six  feet  in  height,  erect  and  stately  in  his  carriage,  and  was  a 
man  of  great  sternness  of  character.  His  manner  in  the  pulpit  was 
earnest  and  impressive,  and  his  sermons  highly  evangelical.  He 
preached  both  in  Dutch  and  English.  In  his  intercourse  with  his  neigh- 
bors he  seems  to  have  displayed  a  parsimony  that  was  harsh  and 
miserly,  dealing  justice  rather  than  mercy.  That  his  object  in  accu- 
mulating money  was  not  selfish  was  shown  when  he  attended  the 
General  Synod  in  1814,  and  emptied  pocket  after  pocket  on  the  Mod- 
erator's desk,  until  he  had  turned  over  $800  in  cash,  and  $13,840  in 
securities,  which  he  gave  to  Rutgers  College,  in  trust,  the  income  to 
be  used  to  aid  young  men  to  prepare  for  the  ministry.  By  his  will  he 
increased  the  fund  to  $17,000.  It  was  allowed  to  accumulate  to  $20,000, 
at  which  it  still  stands.  The  interest  has  assisted  nearly  two  hundred 
young  men  in  their  studies. 

Ephraim  Brevard  was  of  Huguenot  extraction.  After  graduating, 
he  returned  to  his  home  in  North  Carolina  and  studied  medicine,  and 
entered  upon  practice.  He  is  said  to  have  been  a  leading  spirit  in  the 
Mecklenburg  Convention,  and  is  credited  with  having  drafted  the  Reso- 
lutions which  have  become  so  noted.  When  the  British  forces  invaded 
the  Southern  States,  Dr.  Brevard  entered  the  army  as  Surgeon,  and 
was  taken  prisoner  at  the  surrender  of  Charleston,  May  12,  1780.  The 
sufferings  of  those  captured  at  that  time  were  extreme,  and  Brevard 
contracted  a  wasting  fever  which  soon  brought  him  to  his  end. 

Pierpont  Edwards,  a  son  of  President  Jonathan  Edwards,  was  born 
in  Northampton,  Mass.,  April  S,  1750.  After  graduating  at  Princeton, 
in  1768,  he  studied  law,  and  began  the  practice  at  New  Haven  in  1771, 
and  was  for  many  years  distinguished  at  the  Connecticut  Bar.  He 
served  in  the  Revolutionary  army,  was  a  member  of  the  Legislature 
of  that  State  for  a  number  of  years,  served  in  the  Continental  Congress, 
1787-8,  and  in  the  Federal  Convention  of  1788.  He  was  Judge  of  the 
United  States  District  Court  for  several  years,  and  until  his  death, 
April  14,  1826. 

William  Churchill  Houston  was  born  about  1746  in  Sumter  county, 
South  Carolina,  son  of  a  prominent  and  wealthy  planter,  who  was  a 
member  of  the  Society  of  Friends.  His  father,  in  deference  to  the  views 
of  the  Society,  refused  to  give  his  son  a  liberal  education,  but  at  last 
consented  to  furnish  him  a  horse,  equipments,  clothes  and  fifty  pounds 
in  money,  to  do  with  as  he  pleased.  The  young  man  gladly  accepted 
the-  compromise  and  made  his  way  to  Princeton,  where  he  entered  the 


1768]  NEWSPAPER   EXTRACTS.  289 

A  STAGE  WAGGON, 

Between  Poulas's  Hook  Ferry  and  Hackinsack,  will 
begin  on  Friday  the  i^th  Instant  October,  to  set  out, 
at  about  Seven  in  the  Morning. 

FROM  the  House  of  the  Widow  Watson,  at  New-Bar- 
badoes,  (where  the  best  Entertainment  may  be  had)  and 
will  proceed  to  Poulas's-Hook,  from  whence  the  Waggon 
will  set  out  on  its  Return,  at  two  o' Clock  in  the  After- 
noon; which  Stages  will  be  regularly  performed  every 
Monday  and  Friday,  and  the  best  Usage  given  to  Passen- 
gers, each  paying  two  Shillings  from  one  Place  to  the 
other. 

College  of  New  Jersy  in  the  freshman  year.  In  order  to  defray  his 
expenses  he  also  took  charge  of  the  grammar  school  connected  with 
the  college,  and  taught  it  while  keeping  up  with  his  classes  in  college. 
He  graduated  in  1768  with  distinguished  honor,  receiving  from  the 
authorities  a  silver  medal.  On  graduating,  he  was  continued  as  tutor* 
until  1771,  when  he  was  appointed  the  first  professor  of  mathematics 
and  natural  philosophy,  the  duties  of  which  chair  he  discharged  for 
twelve  years  with  fidelity  and  signal  ability.  From  his  orders  on  the 
treasurer  of  the  College,  in  1770,  and  a  receipt  to  that  officer  in  1773, 
both  in  the  Dreer  Collection,  in  the  Historical  Society  of  Pennsylvania, 
it  would  appear  that  his  yearly  salary  was  something  like  £40  Jersey 
money,  or  about  $100.  Young  as  he  was,  the  Continental  Congress 
selected  him  to  serve  as  Deputy  Secretary  of  that  body,  and  he  offici- 
ated as  such  during  a  part  of  1775  and  1776.  Two  documents  in  his 
handwriting,  and  signed  by  him  as  Deputy  Secretary,  one  of  22  Decem- 
ber, 1775,  and  another  of  1  May  (1776  ?),  are  in  the  Historical  Society 
of  Pennsylvania.  He  was  treasurer  of  the  College,  1779-1783,  and  acted 
as  librarian  also  for  a  time.  When  the  institution  was  suspended,  in 
1776,  he  was  appointed  by  the  Provincial  Congress,  Feb.  28,  1776,  Cap- 
tain in  the  2d  Regiment  of  foot  militia  in  the  county  of  Somerset,  serv- 
ing in  that  capacity  until  Aug.  17,  1777,  when  he  wrote  the  Provincial 
Cor-gress  "that,  from  his  connexion  with  the  college  in  the  absence  of 
Dr.  Witherspoon,  &  other  circumstances,  he  cannot  pay  the  due  atten- 
tion to  his  company,  &  begging  leave  to  resign  his  commission."  His 
resignation  was  accordingly  accepted.  He  was  elected  to  the  second 
Assembly,  from  Somerset  county,  taking  his  seat  Oct.  28,  1777,  and 
was  re-elected  a  year  later,  but  vacated  his  office  June  11,  1779,  on  his 
election  (May  25)  as  a  delegate  to  the  Continental  Congress.  As  just 
stated,  the  New  Jersey  Legislature  in  joint  meeting  on  May  25,  1779, 
elected  Mr.  Houston  to  be  one  of  the  delegates  of  New  Jersey  to  the 
Continental  Congress.  He  was  re-elected  to  that  body  Nov.  17,  1779, 
Nov.  23,  1780,  Nov.  2,  1781,  and  after  an  interval  of  three  years  was 
again  elected  to  Congress  on  Oct.  29,  1784.  In  the  deliberations  and 
measures  of  that  body  he  took  an  active  and  prominent  part.  Several 
of  his  letters,  while  in  Congress,  to  Governor  Livingston,  show  that  he 
possessed  a  clear  and  intelligent  perception  of  the  critical  situation  of 
the  country,  and  of  the  measures  best  calculated  to  improve  its  con- 
dition. In  the  meantime  he  studied  law  with  Richard  Stockton,  of 
Princeton,  and  was  admitted  to  the  New  Jersey  Bar  at  the  April  term, 
1781.  Determined  to  address  himself  exclusively  to  the  practice  of  his 
chosen  profession,  he  resigned  his  professorship,  and  also  his  office 

*Writing  from  Nassau  Hall,  September  30,  1769,  James  Madison  men- 
tions that  the  trustees  "have  chosen  for  tutors  for  the  ensuing  year, 
for  the  junior  class,  Mr.  Houston  from  North  Carolina,  in  the  room  of 
Mr.  JPeream."  ....  — Letters  ami  Other  Writings  of  James  Madison, 
New  York,  1884,  I.,  3. 

19 


- 


2  QO  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

N.  B.  The  Waggon  will  regularly  stop  about  eight  in 
the  Morning  and  three  in  the  Afternoon,  at  the  Tavern  of 
Mr.  William  Earl,  in  Bergen  Woods,  where  any  Person 
coming  over  Wehawk  Ferry,  may  readily  get  a  Passage 
to  New- York  or  Hackinsack,  in  the  said  Waggon,  kept 
by  JOHN  BARDAN. 

New- Jersey         )      PURSUANT  to  an  order  of  the  hon. 

Monmouth-County   >      Charles  Reade,  and  John  Berrien, 

Sept.  26,  1768.      )      esqrs.  two  of  the  judges  of  the 

supreme  court  of  judicature  of  the  province  of  New-Jer- 

as  treasurer  of  the  College,  in  1783,  and  removed  to  Trenton,  where  he 
soon  acquired  a  considerable  practice,  notwithstanding  his  rigid  deter- 
mination that  he  would  never  undertake  a  cause  which  he  did  not 
believe  to  be  just.  He  received  the  appointment  of  Clerk  of  the 
Supreme  Court,  Sept.  28,  1781.  He  resigned  this  office  March  17,  1786, 
but  was  re-elected  the  same  day,  and  continued  in  that  position  until 
his  death.  He  was  Receiver  of  Continental  Taxes,  1782-1785.  It  has 
been  stated  that  he  held  the  office  of  Surrogate  of  Hunterdon  county, 
but  no  evidence  has  been  found  in  support  of  that  assertion.  He  was 
one  of  the  five  commissioners  appointed  by  Congress  to  adjust  the  dis- 
pute between  Pennsylvania  and  Connecticut,  in  relation  to  the  Wyoming 
lands.  They  met  at  Trenton,  November  12 -December  30,  1782,  and  their 
award,  though  acceptable  to  neither  side,  did  avoid  a  very  threatening 
situation.  The  New  Jersey  Legislature  appointed  Mr.  Houston,  on 
March  21,  1786,  to  represent  New  Jersey  at  the  Annapolic  Convention, 
giving  the  delegates  larger  powers  than  those  vested  in  the  representa- 
tives from  other  states,  thus  paving  the  way  for  the  Federal  Conven- 
tion a  year  and  a  half  later.  On  Nov.  23,  1786,  the  Legislature  ap- 
pointed Mr.  Houston,  together  with  David  Brearly,  William  Paterson 
and  John  Neilson,  to  represent  New  Jersey  in  the  Federal  Convention, 
which  met  at  Philadelphia  in  1787,  and  framed  the  National  Constitu- 
tion. William  Livingston  and  Abraham  Clark  were  added  to  the  dele- 
tion, May  18,  1787,  and  Jonathan  Dayton  on  June  5,  1787.  Mr.  Houston 
had  been  detained  at  home  by  illness,  but  was  present  to  help  form 
the  quorum  which  was  obtained  on  May  25,  1787.  On  June  6  he  was 
absent.  (Madison  to  Jefferson,  June  6,  1787.)  On  July  17,  1787,  when 
the  Convention  had  under  consideration  the  clause  relating  to  the 
Presidency,  Mr.  Houston  moved  to  strike  out  the  paragraph  making 
the  President  of  the  United  States  ineligible  for  a  second  term,  and 
his  motion  was  carried.  (Mr.  Bancroft,  however,  says  this  motion  was 
made  by  Mr.  William  Houston,  of  Georgia.  The  published  reports  of 
the  Convention  merely  mention  "Mr.  Houston"  as  taking  part  in  the 
proceedings  that  day;  but  in  the  indices  to  Gilpin's  ed.  of  Madison's 
Papers,  II.,  1124;  Elliot's  Debates,  V.,  325,  and  to  the  Documentary 
History  of  the  Constitution,  published  by  Congress  in  1900,  the  motion 
in  question  is  attributed  to  William  Churchill  Houston.)  His  name 
does  not  appear  among  those  who  signed  the  Constitution,  probably 
because  of  his  absence  on  account  of  declining  health,  which  had  ren- 
dered him  unable  to  remain  in  the  Convention  after  July  23.  He  signed 
the  report  made  to  the  Legislature  by  the  New  Jersey  delegates  to  the 
Convention.  In  order,  if  possible,  to  regain  his  former  strength,  he 
resolved  to  go  South,  but  was  stricken  down  suddenly  at  Frankford, 
near  Philadelphia,  and  died  there  on  August  12,  1788.*  The  Pennsyl- 
vania Packet,  and  Daily  Advertiser,  No.  2973,  August  13,  1788,  contains 
this  brief  announcement  of  his  death  and  of  the  funeral  services: 

*David  Evans,  cabinet  maker,  of  Philadelphia,  enters  in  his  day- 
book, August  12,  1788:  "Made  a  coffin  for  William  Churchill  Houston 
Esq.  of  Trenton,  who  died  at  Geiss's  tavern,  on  Frankford  road." — 
Penn.  Mag.  of  Hist,  and  Biog.,  XXVII.,  50. 


1768] 


NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  29! 


sey :  Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  respective  creditors  of 
William  Van  Kirk,  and  John  Van  Kirk,  insolvent  debt- 
ors in  the  gaol  of  the  said  county;  that  they  be  and  appear 
on  Wednesday  the  ninth  day  of  November  next,  at  the 
Court-house  in  the  county  of  Burlington,  at  twelve  o'clock 
of  the  same  day,  to  shew  cause,  (if  any  they  have)  why 
the  estates  of  the  said  debtors,  should  not  be  assigned  for 

"Yesterday  morning  died  on  his  way  to  this  city,  the  Hon.  William 
Churchill  Houston,  Esq.  late  of  Trenton,  formerly  one  of  the  Repre- 
sentatives in  Congress  from  the  State  of  New-Jersey. — The  citizens 
are  respectfully  requested  to  attend  his  funeral  from  the  house  of  Mr. 
Sergeant,  in  Arch-street,  This  Morning,  at  Eight  o'clock."  The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette  and  the  Pennsylvania  Journal  make  no  mention  of 
Mr.  Churchill's  decease.  He  was  buried  in  the  yard  of  the  Second 
Presbyterian  church,  which  then  stood  at  the  northwest  corner  of  Arch 
and  Third  streets,  Philadelphia.  Mr.  Churchill  married  Jane,  daughter 
of  the  Rev.  Caleb  Smith,  pastor  of  the  First  Presbyterian  church  of 
Orange,  New  Jersey.  His  wife's  mother  was  Martha  (m.  Sept.  7,  1748, 
d.  Aug.  10,  1757),  youngest  daughter  of  the  Rev.  Jonathan  Dickinson, 
the  first  President  of  Princeton  College.  Mrs.  Houston  died  in  1796, 
aged  forty-one,  and  is  buried  in  Lawrenceville  cemetery. 
Children: 

1.  William  Churchill,  a  successful  merchant  in  Philadelphia,  who 

married  Susan  Somers,  of  Philadelphia. 

2.  Louisa  Ann,  married  Dr.  John  Vancleve,  of  Princeton. 

3.  Elizabeth,  married  Horace  G.  Phillips,  who  removed  to  Day- 

ton, Ohio,  about  1804. 

4.  George  S.,  married  Mary  Forman. 

The  foregoing  account  of  William  Churchill  Houston  has  been  com- 
piled from  a  biographical  notice  by  William  C.  Alexander,  published 
in  the  New  York  Observer,  of  March  18,  1858,  and  reproduced  in  great 
part  in  Hall's  Hist.  Presbyterian  Church  in  Trenton,  p.  308;  Cooley's 
Genealogy  of  Early  Settlers  in  Trenton  and  EWing,  N.  J.,  pp.  124-128; 
Correspondence  of  the  Executive  of  N.  J.  during  the  Revolution;  Min- 
utes Provincial  Congress  of  N.  J.,  395,  541;  Minutes  of  the  Legislature, 
and  of  the  Joint  Meeting,  passim;  Princeton  University  General  Cat- 
alogue. Other  sources  are  noticed  in  the  text.  Since  the  foregoing  was 
written  there  has  appeared  tfie  fullest  sketch  of  Mr.  Houston  yet  pub- 
lished—by Thomas  Allen  Glenn,  Norristown,  Pa.,  1903,  8vo,  pp.  96. 

Adlai  Osborne  was  a  son  of  Alexander  Osborne,  a  Colonel  in  the 
Colonial  army.  After  graduating,  Mr.  Osborne  returned  to  his  home 
in  North  Carolina,  and  was  soon  appointed  Clerk  of  Rowan  county, 
under  royal  rule,  and  held  the  same  office  after  the  war  until  1809. 
During  the  Revolution  he  served  as  a  Colonel  in  the  American  army. 
He  was  one  of  the  original  Trustees  of  the  University  of  North  Caro- 
lina. He  died  in  1815. 

Thomas  Reese  was  born  in  Pennsylvania  in  1742.  Removing  to 
North  Carolina  with  his  parents  when  quite  young,  he  was  prepared 
for  college  by  Rev.  Joseph  Alexander.  Returning  to  South  Carolina 
after  his  graduation,  he  studied  theology,  and  was  licensed  by  Orange 
Presbytery  in  1773,  and  was  ordained  and  installed  over  Salem  church 
in  the  same  year.  In  1792  he  accepted  a  call  to  two  churches  in  Pen- 
dleton  district.  He  received  the  Degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity  from 
Princeton  in  1794.  Dr.  Reese  was  an  accomplished  scholar,  his  ap- 
pearance in  the  pulpit  was  graceful  and  dignified,  his  style  flowing 
and  elegant.  For  five  or  six  years  of  his  later  life,  besides  performing 
the  regular  duties  of  a  pastor,  preaching  on  the  Sabbath,  and  lecturing 
to  the  colored  part  of  his  congregation,  he  superintended  a  small  farm, 
and  attended  to  a  large  classical  school.  He  died  in  1796. 

Thomas  Smith  was  licensed  by  the  Presbytery  of  New  Castle,  Del., 
about  1772,  and  ordained  and  settled  as  pastor  of  Middleton  and  Pecan- 
der  churches,  in  Delaware,  in  1774.  He  died  Jan.  25,  1792. 

Isaac  Story  became  a  Congregational  minister,  and  settled  at  Mar- 
blehead,  Massachusetts,  in  1771.  After  preaching  thirty  years,  he  left 
the  ministry  and  engaged  in  secular  pursuits.  He  died  in  1816. 


2 Q2  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

the  benefit  of  their  creditors,  and  their  persons  discharged, 
agreeable  to  a  late  act  of  the  legislature  of  the  said  prov- 
ince, for  the  relief  of  insolvent  debtors. — The  New  York 
Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1344,  October  6,  1768. 

CUSTOM-  HOUSE,  Philadelphia,  CLEARED.  Schooner 
Polly,  A.  Mansfield,  Salem. 

Trenton,  September  29,  1768. 

THE  Members  of  the  New-Jersey  MEDICAL  SOCIETY, 
are  desired  to  remember,  that  their  next  stated  General 
Meeting  will  be  on  the  First  Tuesday  in  November  next, 
at  the  House  of  Mr.  DUFF,  in  New-Brunswick;  and  as 
some  important  Matters,  respecting  the  farther  Establish- 
ment, &c.  of  said  Society,  will  then  be  taken  into  Consid- 
eration, it  is  expected  that  every  Member  will  punctually 
attend,  if  nothing  very  extraordinary  should  interfere. 

For  the  above  Reason,  those  Gentlemen  of  the  Profes- 
sion, who  have  not  hitherto  joined  the  Society,  are  invited 
to  attend  at  the  Time  and  Place  above  mentioned. 

ISAAC  SMITH,  Secretary. 

TEN  POUNDS  Reward, 

RUN  away,  in  the  night  of  the  3Oth  of  September,  from 
the  subscriber,  living  at  Mount-holly,  in  New-Jersey,  an 
Irish  servant  man,  named  John  O'Bryan,  but  denies  that 
the  O  belongs  to  his  name,  aged  about  35  years,  about  5 
feet  6  inches  high,  marked  with  the  small-pox,  speaks 
pretty  good  English,  with  a  little  of  the  brogue,  is  a  shoe- 
maker by  trade,  and  can  work  plantation  work,  has  short 
dark  curled  hair :  Had  on,  when  he  went  away,  a  felt  hat, 
light  coloured  cloth  jacket,  lined  with  flannel,  new  ozen- 
brigs  shirt  and  trowsers,  pretty  good  shoes,  with  large 
brass  buckles,  but  may  be  likely  to  change  his  clothes,  as 
he  stole  from  his  master  a  bearskin  riding  coat,  with  side 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  293 

pockets,  a  bluish  cloth  jacket,  faded  to  a  light  colour,  with 
metal  buttons,  a  pair  of  old  superfine  cloth  breeches,  of  a 
blue  colour,  mixed  with  red,  a  white  ruffled  shirt,  an  old 
leather  jacket,  with  a  piece  put  in  the  back,  lined  with 
woollen,  a  pair  of  lattice  made  silver  buckles,  light  blue 
grey  stockings,  a  large  silk  handkerchief,  ticken  trowsers, 
and  old  striped  shirt;  he  had  with  him  two  new  pairs  of 
ozenbrigs  trowsers,  and  two  new  ozenbrigs  shirts;  and 
stole  his  master's  sorrel  horse,  above  14  hands  high,  with 
a  white  face,  and  white  hind  legs,  paces,  trots  and  gallops 
well;  an  old  saddle  and  bridle,  and  a  bag,  in  which  he  car- 
ried the  things,  but  may  have  stolen  many  more  things, 
not  yet  discovered.  Whoever  secures  the  above  servant 
and  horse,  &c.  so  that  his  master  may  have  them  again, 
shall  have  the  above  reward,  or  Four  Pounds  for  the 
horse,  &c.  and  Six  Pounds  for  the  man.  The  same  fellow 
and  horse  is  advertised  in  single  advertisements,  at  Six 
Pounds;  but  in  this  I  have  advanced  the  reward  to  Ten 
Pounds,  if  not  taken  before  it  comes  out. 

JOHN  MONROW. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2076,  October  6, 
1768. 

Capt.  Wasdale,  from  Leghorn,  the  pth  ult.  in  lat.  21,  40, 
long.  60,  spoke  the  brig  Greyhound,  Capt.  Alexander, 
from  this  port  for  St.  Eustatia,  out  18  days;  and  on  the 
29,  50  leagues  S.  E.  of  our  Capes,  with  Capt.  Davidson, 
in  a  sloop  from  this  port  for  Jamaica,  out  two  days. 

RUN  away  on  the  28th  day  of  September  1768,  from 
the  subscriber,  living  in  Greenwich  township  in  Glouces- 
ter county,  an  Irish  servant  lad  named  Thomas  Morehead, 
but  sometimes  passes  by  the  name  of  Dowel;  with  black 
hair,  about  nineteen  years  of  age :  Had  on  when  he  went 
away,  an  old  shirt  and  trowsers,  oznabrigs  frock,  and  a 


294  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

felt  hat;  he  has  been  four  years  in  the  country,  and  it  is 
expected  he  will  change  his  name.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  said  lad  in  any  goal,  so  that  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  receive  Forty  Shillings  reward,  and  all 
reasonable  charges  paid,  by 

ARCHIBALD  MAFFETT. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him 
off  at  their  peril. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1348, 
October  6,  1768. 

TWENTY  DOLLARS  REWARD. 

BROKE-out  of  the  Goal  of  the  County  of  Morris,  and 
Province  of  New-Jersey,  a  few  Days  ago,  two  Criminals, 
one  of  which  named,  John  Smith,  45  Years  old,  about  5 
Feet  10  Inches  high,  long-visaged,  and  his  Hair  somewhat 
grey;  the  other  named  John  Harbor,  a  likely  young  Fel- 
low, about  5  Feet  3  Inches  high,  and  has  the  Letter  D 
marked  on  one  of  his  Hands  with  Gun-powder,  and  both 
of  them  born  in  Ireland  :  They  were  both  bare  of  Cloathes, 
but  may  be  well  cloathed,  as  a  House  not  far  from  the 
Goal  was  robbed  the  Night  they  escaped,  of  the  following 
Cloaths,  (one  of  the  two  having  been  committed  for  rob- 
bing the  same  before)  A  mixed  blue  and  white  lappelled 
Coat  and  Jacket  with  blue  Buttons  &  Binding,  a  faded 
snuff  coloured  lappelled  Coat  with  yellow  Binding,  a  Pair 
of  Leather  Breeches  almost  new,  a  Pair  of  new  knit 
Breeches,  and  two  Pair  of  Pumps  and  Stockings.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  the  said  Fellows,  so  that  they 
may  be  brought  to  Justice,  shall  have  the  above  Reward, 
or  10  Dollars  for  each,  paid  by 

DANIEL  COOPER,  Jun.  Sheriff. 

Morris-County,  Octo.  7,  1768. 

Woodbridge,  (N.  Jersey)  October  5,  1768. 
STOLEN  from  the  Subscriber,  on  Tuesday  Night  the 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  295 

4th  Instant,  by  a  Person  who  calls  himself  Richard  How- 
ard; a  lightish  Brown  Horse,  about  14  Hands  and  a  Half 
high,  with  a  Star  and  small  Snip :  The  Horse  has  been 
stifled  in  his  right  Leg,  and  has  a  Ring  round  his  near 
Leg,  occasioned  by  wearing  a  Cord :  Also  a  Saddle,  al- 
most new,  and  a  Curb  Bridle  of  black  Leather.  He  also 
took  away  with  him,  a  lightish  colour 'd  Great  Coat,  of 
Coating,  with  Basket  Buttons,  and  bound  round  the  But- 
ton-holes; the  Cape  lined  with  green:  A  new  double- 
breasted  Jacket,  black  and  blue  Broad  Cloth,  with  slash 
Sleeves,  lined  with  Flannel,  and  Horn  Buttons;  also  a 
Pair  of  Boots,  with  a  Spur-piece  up  behind.  He  had  on  a 
Castor  Hat,  blue  Homespun  Coat,  that  has  been  turn'd. 
a  strip'd  Cotton  Lappell'd  Jacket,  two  check'd  Shirts,  long 
stripped  Cotton  Trowsers,  about  5  Feet  7  Inches  high, 
black  curl'd  Hair,  round  Shoulder'd,  thin  Beard,  high 
boned,  long  Chin,  thick  spoken :  Whoever  takes  up  said 
Thief  and  Horse,  &c.  and  secures  him  in  any  Jail,  so  that 
I  can  get  them  again,  shall  have  TEN  POUNDS  Reward  for 
their  Trouble  and  Cost,  and  FIVE  POUNDS  for  the  Thief 
alone,  also  THREE  POUNDS  for  the  Horse,  &c.  current 
Money  of  New- Jersey,  paid  by 

SAMUEL  JAQUES. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1345,  October  10,  1768. 

TEN  DOLLARS  Reward. 

LOST  on  Sunday  the  loth  ult,  on  the  road  betwixt  Phil- 
adelphia and  Bristol,  a  TRIANGULAR  SEAL,  set  in  gold, 
and  ingraved  on  each  side.  Whoever  has  found  it,  and 
will  deliver  it  to  the  Printer,  bring  it  to  Lieutenant  Mac- 
lellan,1  in  Philadelphia  Barracks,  or  to  Lieutenant  Gordon,2 

i  Probably  Lieut.  Alexander  McLellan,  of  the  34th  Regiment, 
s  Probably   Lieut.   Andrew   Gordon,    of   the  26th  Regiment,    or   Lieut. 
Francis  Gordon,  of  the  60th  Regiment. 


296  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

at  the  Barracks,  in  Perth- Amboy,  shall  receive  the  above 
Reward. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  92,  October 
12-17,  1768. 

New- Jersey  )  PURSUANT  to  an  order  of  the  hon. 
Monmouth-county,  >  John  Anderson,  and  John  Taylor, 

Oct.  3,  1768  \  esqrs.  two  of  the  judges  of  the 
court  of  common  pleas  of  the  province  of  New -Jersey: 
Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  respective  creditors  of  Oba- 
diah  Worthley,  an  insolvent  debtor  in  the  gaol  of  said 
county;  that  they  be  and  appear  on  Monday  the  i/|.th  day 
of  November  next,  at  the  Court-house  in  the  said  county, 
at  Freehold,  at  twelve  o'clock  of  the  same  day,  to  shew 
cause,  (if  any  they  have)  why  the  estate  of  the  said  debtor, 
should  not  be  assigned  for  the  benefit  of  his  creditors,  and 
his  person  discharged,  agreeable  to  a  late  act  of  the  legis- 
lature of  the  said  province,  for  the  relief  of  insolvent 
debtors. 

To  be  sold  the  noted  plantation  known  by  the  name  of 
Chesequakes,  lying  in  the  south  ward  of  Perth- Am- 
boy, in  the  province  of  East  New- Jersey. 

Now  in  the  tenure  of  the  subscriber, 
VIEW  OF   ]      fronting  the  bay  which  is  between  the 
south-side  of  Staten-island  and  Sandy- 

T~~TOTTQTTQ  •  ' 

Tiook"      ^}  T"i  rl     IOITIQ    f" Vi f*    pf^f-^K*    OT    i^nf^^f*— 

n<io1^-£u-*        /-\*-»     -4-V* /^     •fi/"i+*4-V»      riijAti     4-Vi 

AND 

FARM. 

quantity  of  salt  hay,  and  the  land  as 
good  as  any  in  that  neighbourhood;  a  large  quantity  of 
timber  thereon.  It  may  conveniently  be  divided  into  three 
or  four  farms,  with  a  sufficient  quantity  of  salt  meadow 
to  each ;  there  is  on  it  two  convenient  dwelling  houses : 
The  whole  well  watered  and  timbered,  convenient  for  oys- 


quakes,  on  the  north-side  thereof  con- 
venient to  lands  :  On  the  premises,  is 
salt  meadow  ^ufficient  to  mow  a  large 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  297 

taring,  fishing,  and  fowling  as  any  along  that  coast.  It 
will  be  sold  the  whole  or  in  part;  a  good  title  will  be 
given  by  the  subscriber,  where  further  intelligence  may  be 
had.  NICHOLAS  EVERSON 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1345.  October  13,  1768. 

The  ANATOMIST.     Number  VI 

In  my  last,  I  had  given  some  account  of  the  attack  made 
on  the  Church  by  Mr.  Smith,  the  impartial  Presbyterian 
Historian  of  New-York;  and  endeavoured  to  shew,  that 
nothing  but  the  most  determined  resolution  to  traduce  the 
Church,  and  the  Society  for  the  propagation  of  the  gospel, 
could  have  induced  the  gentleman  to  assert,  that  the  late 
Dr.  Barclay  was  obliged  to  break  up  his  Mohawk  mission, 
because  no  suitable  provision  had  been  made  for  an  inter- 
preter by  the  Society 

In  the  note  under  the  forty-second  page,  he  gives  an 
account  of  the  "extreme  mortification,  inextinguishable 
zeal,  and  great  success  of  Mr.  David  Brainerd,  a  late  mis- 
sionary from  the  Scotch  Society  among  some  Indians  in 
New-Jersey,  not  one  of  them,  he  tells  us,  has  been  con- 
cerned in  those  barbarous  irruptions  which  have  lately 
deluged  the  south-western  provinces  with  the  blood  of 
several  hundred  innocents  of  every  age  and  sex."  .... 

"As  to  Mr.  Brainerd1 's  mortification  and  zeal,  every 
good  man  must  approve  and  commend  these  virtues 
wherever  they  are  found,  and  I  hope  he  is  now  reaping  the 
glorious  rewards  of  them.  As  to  his  success,  tho'  Paul 
plant,  and  Apollos  water,  it  is  GOD  alone  that  gives  the 
increase.  I  heartily  wish  I  could  say  that  I  had  heard 
those  Indians  continue  the  same  regular  society  of  Chris- 
tians since  his  death.  His  brother  and  successor  in  that 


298  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

mission,  I  am  told,  has  left  them,  and  taken  the  charge 
*of  an  English  congregation  at  Newark 

As  to  Mr.  Smith's  remark  on  that  happy  effect  of  Mr. 
Br ainer d's  mission,  viz.  "That  not  one  of  those  Indians 
have  been  concerned  in  those  barbarous  irruptions,  &c  I 
am  persuaded  some  prejudice  must  have  prevented  his 
making  the  same  observations  with  regard  to  the  Mo- 
hawks, as  it  is  most  notorious  that  they  have  not  only  been 
inoffensive,  but  are  the  only  tribe  of  the  Confederates  that 
have  openly  joined  us,  and  attended  our  armies  in  the 
present  war." 

"The  Episcopal  missionaries"  (says  he,  page  42)  "for 
"enlarging  the  sphere  of  their  secular  business,  not  many 
"years  ago,  attempted,  by  a  petition  to  the  late  Governor 
"Clinton,  to  engross  the  privilege  of  solemnizing  all  mar- 
"riages.  A  great  clamour  ensued,  and  the  attempt  was 
"abortive."  .... 

Dr.  Barclay  shows  this  whole  paragraph  to  be  an  abso- 
lute falsehood 

The  prayer  of  the  clergy  therefore  was,  that  an  addition 
might  be  made  to  the  future  direction  of  licenses  thus,  viz. 
"To  any  Protestant  minister  of  the  gospel  (Mr.  Smith 
says,  not  very  accurately  -  -  -  "To  all  Protestant  minis- 
ters of  the  gospel")  -  -  The  Governor  complied  with 
this  request,  and  far  from  raising  any  clamour,  the  meas- 
ure was  greatly  approved  by  $  the  clergy  of  all  other  de- 
nominations, who  reaped  proportionately  far  more  benefit 
from  it  than  the  Episcopal  clergy.  .  .  .  . 

*This  was  the  case  at  the  time  of  Dr.  Barclays  writing. 
But  Mr.  Brainerd,  the  brother^  since  had,  and  now  has,  I 
believe  some  Jersey  Indians  under  his  pastoral  care,  and 
his  labors  among  them  are  well  reported  of. 

iThe  Rev.  John  Brainerd.  See  N.  J.  Archives,  IX.,  355;  and  "The 
Indians  of  New  Jersey,"  etc.,  by  William  Nelson.  Paterson.  N.  J.,  1894, 
pp.  118,  143-6.  The  Presbyterian  church  at  Newark  is  referred  to. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  299 

$  The  like  alteration  was  made  by  Governor  Franklin, 
some  years  ago,  in  the  direction  of  his  licenses,  on  an  ap- 
plication of  the  Episcopal  clergy  of  New-Jersey,  and  the 
Presbyterians  were  well  pleased  with  it. 

PHILADELPHIA,  October  13.  Captain  Simmonds,  from 
Quebec,  last  from  Cape  Breton  .  .  .  .  on  the  8th, 
about  25  Leagues  from  our  Capes — spoke  a  Schooner, 
Captain  Stillwell,  bound  to  St.  Christophers,  from  this 
Harbour. 


The  FALL  FAIR  for  PRINCETON,  in  New  Jersey, 
will  be  held  there,  on  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  the  Nine- 
teenth and  Twentieth  of  this  instant  October. 

Burlington,  Tenth  Month  8,  1768. 
WHEREAS  by  virtue  of  an  act  of  Assembly  of  New-Jer- 
sey, in  such  case  made  and  provided,  a  writ  of  attachment 
issued  out  of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas  for  the  county 
of  Burlington,  against  the  lands,  goods,  and  effects,  of  a 
certain  Jonathan  Smith,  late  of  said  county,  yeoman :  and 
we,  the  subscribers,  were  appointed  by  the  said  Court  au- 
ditors, to  adjust  the  demands  of  his  creditors :  NOTICE  is 
hereby  given,  that  a  judgment  was  obtained  against  the 
said  Jonathan  Smith  by  default,  and  that,  by  virtue  of  an 
order  and  rule  of  Court  for  that  purpose  made,  we  shall 
on  the  first  day  of  the  Eleventh  Month,  (November)  next, 
at  the  house  of  John  Shaw,  in  the  city  of  Burlington,  ex- 
pose to  sale  at  public  vendue,  a  certain  dwelling-house  and 
lot  of  land,  situate  in  said  city  on  the  south-side  of  Pearl- 
street,  a  little  above  York-street,  now  in  the  tenure  of 
John  Noarth;  being  the  estate  of  the  said  Jonathan  Smith, 
and  to  enable  us  to  satisfy  the  demands  of  his  creditors, 
whose  accounts  we  have  adjusted.  JOHN  HOSKINS,  WILL- 
IAM HEWLINGS,  DANIEL  SMITH,  junior. 


300  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

Burlington,  October,  1768. 

WHEREAS  the  subscribers,  assignees  in  trust  for  the  use 
of  the  creditors  of  Lambert  Barnes,  late  of  the  city  of  Bur- 
lington, inn-holder,  have  heretofore,  at  two  several  times 
advertised  all  those  who  are  in  any  wise  indebted  to  the 
said  Barnes,  that  they  should  pay  off  their  respective  bal- 
lances;  but  little  regard  having  been  had  thereto,  they  are 
once  more  requested  to  pay  the  same  to  the  subscribers, 
on  or  before  Saturday,  the  226.  of  October  instant,  or  they 
will  be  proceeded  against  according  to  law,  without  re- 
spect to  persons.  At  which  day  the  assignees  will  meet  at 
the  house  of  David  Clayton,  inn-keeper,  in  Burlington, 
when  the  creditors  of  said  Barnes  are  desired  to  exhibit 
their  accounts,  properly  proved,  or  they  will  be  precluded 
from  the  dividend  of  said  Barnes's  estate,  which  will  be 
made  soon  after. 

JOHN  LAWRENCE,  THOMAS  RODMAN,  JOSEPH  IMLAY. 

Woodbridge,  October  8,  1768. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given  to  Charles  Beatty,  of  Frederic 
Town  and  County,  Maryland,  that  Dennis  Combes,  of 
Woodbridge,  hath  taken  up  and  committed;  Francis 
Blackburn,  to  Jail,  in  Perth-Amboy,  East  New- Jersey, 
who  on  examination  owned  that  he,  the  said  Francis 
Blackburn,  was  an  indented  servant  to  Charles  Beatty; 
and  unless  said  Beatty  come  and  take  his  said  servant,  and 
pay  the  Charges,  within  five  weeks  from  this  date,  he  will 
be  sold  for  the  same. 

DENNIS  COMBES. 

To  be  SOLD,  and  may  be  entered  upon  the  first  day  of  Sixth 

Month  (June)  next, 

A  LARGE  LOT  of  LAND,  situate  between  Sixth  and  Sev- 
enth Streets,  in  the  city  of  Philadelphia,  near  the  State- 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3° l 

house,  having  two  fronts  of  237  feet  each,  one  on  Chest- 
nut-street, and  the  other  on  a  street  running  east  and  west 
thro'  the  square.  The  breadth  of  the  lot,  north  and  south, 
is  151  feet.  There  is  on  it  a  very  convenient  brick  dwell- 
ing-house, kitchen,  stables,  coach-house,  and  other  im- 
provements, now  in  the  tenure  of  Dr.  Thomas  Graham. 
As  the  whole  together  is  an  airy  pleasant  situation  for  a 
family,  the  owner  would  choose  to  sell  it  in  that  manner, 
but  if  not  sold  so,  before  the  above  date,  he  proposes  to 
divide  it  into  a  number  of  lots,  either  for  sale,  or  to  be 
leased  on  groundrent.  For  further  information  apply  to 

JOHN  SMITH,  in  Burlington. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

On  Wednesday,  the  23d  day  of  November  next,  at  pub- 
lic vendue,  on  the  premises,  or  at  any  time  before  at  private 
sale, 

A  HOUSE  and  lot  of  land,  in  Princetown;  the  house 
is  one  story,  almost  new,  and  has  four  rooms,  with  a 
kitchen,  and  a  cellar  under  part  of  it;  the  lot  consists  of 
about  half  an  acre,  and  has  a  well  sunk  in  it;  the  situation 
is  very  convenient  for  a  tradesman;  and  an  indisputable 
title  can  be  given. 

WILLIAM  TENNENT.1 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2077,  October  13, 
1768. 

RUN  AWAY  the  2d  inst.  from  the  ship  Newry  Assist- 
ance, William  Chevers,  Master :  A  SERVANT  MAN,  named 
THOMAS  ADLEY,  a  brazier  or  brass  founder  by  trade  but 
has  worked  a  little  at  the  business  of  a  barber,  aged  23 
years,  of  a  dark  complexion,  born  in  Ireland,  about  5  feet 
6  inches  high,  brown  hair,  slow  in  speech  if  not  in  liquor : 

iFor  a   sketch   of  the  Rev.   William   Tennent,   a  famous   clergyman, 
see  N.  J.  Archives,  XX.,  275. 


302  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a  brown  cloth  coat  with 
mohair  buttons,  leather  breeches,  and  a  narrow  trim'd  hat 
well  worn :  It  is  supposed  he  has  changed  his  cloathing. 
Whoever  takes  up  the  said  servant  and  secures  him  in  any 
of  his  Majesty's  goals  of  Pennsylvania,  or  New-Jersey, 
shall  be  paid  THREE  POUNDS  Reward,  and  reasonable  char- 
ges by  JOHN  PRINGLE,  Merchant  in  Philadelphia. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1349,  October  13,  1768. 

New-York,  October  17.  IE-IT'  The  Public  are  hereby 
informed  that  from  good  Intelligence,  received  from  the 
back  Country,  a  large  Number  of  fat  and  store  Horn  Cat- 
tle, Horses  and  Swine,  will  be  offer'd  for  Sale  at  Newark, 
on  Wednesday  the  iQth  of  October  Inst.  being  the  Day 
appointed  by  a  late  Advertisement,  for  the  opening  of  the 
annual  CATTLE-MARKET,  in  that  Town;  and  to  be  con- 
tinued on  the  Thursday  and  Friday  following,  when,  and 
where,  all  Persons  may  be  supplied  with  the  above  men- 
tioned Cattle  and  Swine. 

To  be  sold  at  public  Vendue;  on  Wednesday  the  23d 
of  November  next,  between  the  Hours  of  Twelve  and 
Three  o' Clock  in  the  Afternoon,  at  the  House  of  Thomas 
Kinney,  in  Morris-Town,  in  the  County  of  Morris,  and 
Province  of  New- Jersey;  a  certain  Iron  Forge  known  by 
the  Name  of  Squire's  Point  Forge  (remarkably  healthy) 
consisting  of  three  Fires  and  one  Hammer;  ,with  a  Grist- 
Mill  and  Saw-Mill,  situate  Part  in  the  County  of  Hunter- 
don,  and  Part  in  the  County  of  Sussex,  on  Musconetcung 
River,  (noted  for  a  fine  constant  Stream  of  Water)  with 
about  1800  Acres  of  Land,  great  Part  of  it  well  timbered, 
handy,  and  convenient  to  the  Works,  which  is  conveniently 
situated  to  several  Furnaces,  has  about  37  Miles  Land 
Carriage  to  either  New-Brunswick,  or  Trentown.  On 
the  Premises  are  several  Improvements,  with  a  good 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  303 

Frame  Dwelling-House,  two  good  Frame  Coal-Houses, 
with  all  necessary  Buildings  for  Workmen,  &c.  The 
Works  are  well  and  substantially  built,  in  good  Order  and 
Repair.  It  is  expected  Half  the  Purchase  Money  will  be 
paid  upon  the  Purchaser  taking  Possession  of  the  Prem- 
ises, and  the  remaining  Half,  in  a  Year's  Time,  after  pay- 
ing Interest,  and  giving  Security,  if  required.  A  good 
Title  will  be  given  by  the  Subscribers. 

MARTIN  RYERSON,  GEORGE  READING 
DANIEL  READING,  and  THOMAS  READING. 

THIS  is  to  give  Notice,  That  by  Virtue  of  a  Writ  of 
Fieri  Facias,  issued  out  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Judica- 
ture for  the  Province  of  New- Jersey,  against  the  Goods 
and  Chattels,  Houses,  Lands,  Hereditaments,  and  real 
Estate  of  John  Stearndall,  deceased,  in  the  Hands  of  Rich- 
ard Curson,  Administrator  of  said  John  Stearndall,  in  my 
Bailiwick;  There  will  be  sold  at  public  Vendue,  on  the 
first  Day  of  November  next,  all  the  real  and  personal  Es- 
tate of  the  said  John  Stearndall,  which  I  could  find  in  my 
Bailiwick,  consisting  of  a  Right  the  said  John  Stearndall 
had  in,  and  to,  a  certain  Lease  (yet  unexpired)  of  and  for 
the  Copper  Mines,  (called  Schuyler's  Mines,)  together 
with  all  the  Appurtenances,  Utensils,  and  Instruments 
thereto  belonging;  also  the  Right  which  said  Stearndall 
had  of,  in,  and  to  the  Copper  Ore,  Stamp  Ore,  &c.  at 
New  Barbados  Neck.  The  Terms  of  the  said  Vendue  will 
be  made  known  at  the  Time  of  Sale,  which  will  be  held  at 
or  near  the  said  Mines,  by  me 

JOHN  VAN  BUSKIRK,  Sheriff. 
— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
885,  October  17,  1768. 

For  the  Information  of  the  PUBLIC. 
By  Order  of  the  Trustees  of  the  College  of  New-Jersey. 


304  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

WHEREAS  Complaints  have  been  frequently  made,  of 
the  too  great  Expences  of  Education  in  this  College;   the 
Trustees  have  now  fallen  upon  a  new  Plan,  in  order  to 
bring  the  necessary  Charges  of  living  in  the  said  College, 
within  as  moderate  a  Compass,  as  possible.    These  Com- 
plaints have  been  principally  owing  to  the  remissness  of 
many  of  the  Parents  and  Guardians  of  the  Youth,  in  mak- 
ing punctual  Payments  of  the  College  dues,  which  hath 
obliged  the  Steward,  for  want  of  ready  Cash,  to  purchase 
the  Provisions  frequently  upon  long  Credit,  and  the  Seller 
thence  to  demand  a  considerable  advance  upon  the  Market 
Price.     This  Inconvenience,  is  presumed,  hath  induced 
many  to  keep  their  Children  at  the  Grammar  School,  for 
the  first,  and  sometimes  the  second  Year,  which  ought  to 
have  been  spent  at  the  College;   to  the  manifold  injury  of 
their  Education.    For  the  effectual  Remedy  of  this,  for  the 
future,  and  also,  to  give  the  utmost  Satisfaction  to  those 
who  propose  to  educate  their  Children  at  this  Seminary; 
NOTICE  is  hereby  given  to  the  Public,  that  the  Trustees, 
have  now  contracted  for  the  boarding  of  the  Students,  at 
a  certain  fixed  Rate  per  Week,  viz.    Six  Shillings  and  Six- 
pence Proclamation  Money  of  New-Jersey.    And,  in  order 
to  enable  the  Contractor,  to  pay  ready  Cash  for  all  the  Ar- 
ticles to  be  provided;    It  is  now  Ordered,  that  every  Stu- 
dent, on  his  first  admission  into  the  College,  and  so  at  the 
beginning  of  every  Fall  and  Spring  Term,  do  deposit  in 
the  Hands  of  the  Steward,  the  Sum  of  Seven  Pounds 
Proc.  in  advance,  which  Sum  is  pitched  upon,  as  nearly 
one  half  of  the  Article  of  Board.    And  that,  at  every  an- 
nual Commencement,  or  at  least  at  the  Beginning  of  the 
following  Terms,  before  Admission,  he  be  obliged,  beside 
the  Deposit  of  Board  per  Advance  as  now  ordered,  to  pay 
up  the  whole  Arrears  of  Tuition  Money,  and  Chamber 
Rent  for  the  preceeding  Year.    To  shew  that  there  is  no 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3°5 

Purpose  of  making,  in  any  case,  an  eventual  Gain  by  the 
Deposit,  a  proportional  Part  thereof  will  be  repaid,  in  Case 
of  the  Death  or  necessary  Removal  of  any  Scholar,  during 
the  current  half  Year.  By  this  Means,  the  Inconveniences 
both  to  the  Managers  and  Students,  from  large  Arrear- 
ages unpaid,  will  be  effectually  avoided ;  and  the  latter  be 
as  well  provided  for  as  at  any  Time  heretofore;  which,  it 
is  presumed,  as  to  the  Plenty  or  Goodness  of  the  Commons, 
has  been  on  a  Footing,  not  inferior  to  that  of  any  College 
in  these  Colonies.  Upon  the  Plan  above  adopted,  the  Ex- 
pence  of  living  here,  will  be  within  a  few  Shillings,  more 
or  less,  as  follows; 

To  I  Year's  Board  (deducting  the  Vaca- 
tion Weeks  at  Spring  and  Fall   (at 

6s.  6d.  per  Week.  £.   13.   13.  o 

Fire  Wood  and  Candles,  about,  2.   10.  o 

Washing,  about,  2.   10.  o 

Tuition  and  Chamber  Rent,  5-  oo.  o 


£.  23.   13.  'O 

Every  Student  to  pay  one  Shilling  per  Week,  for  every 
Week's  Absence,  after  the  Vacations  are  ended,  to  indem- 
nify the  Steward,  who  pays  Wages  to  Servants  for  their 
Benefit. 

It  is  presumed,  the  above  Plan  will  remove  every 
Ground  of  Complaint,  and  give  the  most  general  Satisfac- 
tion. The  Parents  and  Guardians  of  the  Youth,  are  there- 
fore desired  to  take  Notice,  that  these  Regulations  will  be 
invariably  adhered  to;  and  it  is  expected,  they  will  conse- 
quently take  the  most  particular  Care,  that,  for  the  future, 
the  Students  come  prepared,  after  every  Fall  and  Spring 
Vacation,  to  make  the  required  Deposit  of  £.  7,  in  advance 
for  Board,  without  which,  he  must  be  put  to  the  Trouble 
and  Expence  of  returning  home  for  the  same;  as  the  Col- 

20 


306  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

lege,  for  the  general  Benefit,  is  determined  strictly  to  exe- 
cute the  above  Plan. 

The  Trustees  further  give  Notice,  that  they  have  made 
Provisions  for  the  Encouragement  of  young  Gentlemen, 
who  have  finished  the  ordinary  Course  of  Philosophy,  to 
return  and  pursue  their  Studies  at  College,  and  fit  them- 
selves for  any  of  the  higher  Branches,  to  which  they  shall 
think  proper,  chiefly  to  devote  their  future  Application, 
whether  those  called  learned  Professions,  Divinity,  Law 
and  Physic,  or  such  liberal  Accomplishments  in  general, 
as  fit  young  Gentlemen  for  serving  their  Country  in  pub- 
lic Stations.  For  this  Purpose,  the  Professor  of  Divinity, 
besides  what  Attention  he  may  give  to  the  Instruction  of 
the  Senior  Class,  will  give  regular  Lectures  upon  the  Sys- 
tem. The  President  also  has  engaged  to  give  Lectures 
twice  in  the  Week,  on  the  following  Subjeces  (i)  On 
Chronology  and  History,  civil  as  well  as  sacred ;  a  Branch 
of  Study,  of  itself  extremely  useful  and  delightful,  and  at 
present  in  the  highest  Reputation  in  every  Part  of  Europe, 
(2)  Critical  Lectures  on  the  Scripture,  with  the  Addition 
of  Discourses  on  Criticism  in  general ;  the  several  Species 
of  Writing,  and  the  fine  Arts  (3)  Lectures  on  Composi- 
tion, and  the  Eloquence  of  the  Pulpit  and  the  Bar.  The 
President  will  also  endeavour  to  assist  every  Student  by 
Conversation,  according  to  the  main  Object,  which  he  shall 
chuse  for  his  own  Studies ;  and  will  give  Lists  and  Char- 
acters of  the  principal  Writers  on  any  Branch,  that  Stu- 
dents may  accomplish  themselves,  at  the  least  Expence  of 
Time  and  Labour.  For  the  Attainment  of  their  Ends,  a 
very  valuable  Addition  to  the  Public  Library  was  brought 
over  with  the  President;  another  large  Collection  of  the 
most  standard  Books,  is  newly  arrived;  and  a  Third  is 
very  soon  expected  from  London.  So  that  this  College, 
which  had  before  all  the  Advantages  for  Study,  that  a  re- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  307 

tired  healthful  Place  could  possess,  is  now  well  furnished 
with  a  valuable  Public  Library,  which  will  be  improved 
by  continual  Additions.  It  is  to  be  observed,  that  from 
those,  who  after  their  ordinary  Courses,  shall  return  to 
College,  in  order  to  pursue  their  Studies  with  those  Ad- 
vantages, no  Tuition  Money  will  be  required,  except  that 
the  French  Language  will  be  taught,  if  desired,  for  a  very 
reasonable  Gratuity. 

List  of  Letters,  remaining  in  the  General  Post-Office, 
New- York,  October  10,  1768. 

....    Mary  House,  Somerset  County — The 

Neiv  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1346,  Octo- 
ber 17,  1768. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Act  of  Assembly  of  the  province  of 
West  New  Jersey,  this  may  notify  all  whom  it  may  con- 
cern, that  sundry  of  the  inhabitants  of  the  townships  of 
Chester,  Evesham,  Northampton  and  Willingburrough, 
in  the  county  of  Burlington,  hath  petitioned  the  Assembly 
of  the  said  province  for  an  act  to  be  passed  to  make  Ran- 
cokas  creek  a  lawful  fence,  from  the  mouth  thereof  to  the 
Forks,  and  from  thence  up  the  south  branch  to  Belly- 
bridge,  and  from  the  said  forks  up  the  north  branch,  to 
Mount  holley-bridge,  near  the  market-house.  Any  per- 
son or  persons,  who  have  any  objections  to  the  said  act, 
are  desired  to  shew  cause  at  the  next  meeting  of  the  Gen- 
eral Assembly  at  Burlington,  or  elsewhere,  as  the  said 
petitioners  expect  to  have  leave  to  bring  in  a  bill  for  the 
same.  October  n,  1768. 

Gloucester  county,  October  n,  1768 
FIVE  POUNDS  Reward 

MADE  their  escape  out  of  Gloucester  goal,  last  night, 
the  three  following  prisoners,  viz.  PATRICK  NEWLIN,  an 


308  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Irishman,  about  5  feet  6  or  7  inches  high,  sandy  complex- 
ion, strait  sandy  hair,  flat  broad  face,  a  peeked  nose,  and 
marked  with  the  small  pox,  is  a  thick  well  set  fellow,  a 
blacksmith  by  trade,  says  he  has  been  a  soldier,  and  been 
on  board  a  man  of  war;  had  on  a  short  red  under  jacket, 
without  sleeves,  old  check  shirt,  old  leather  breeches,  light 
blue  grey  stockings,  old  shoes,  with  one  brass  buckle,  but 
had  no  hat,  is  about  34  years  old,  and  very  apt  to  get 
drunk.  DAVID  COCHRAN,  about  27  years  old,  5  feet  8 
inches  high,  long  visaged,  has  red  curled  hair,  sandy  beard 
and  eyebrows,  has  had  the  bridge  of  his  nose  half  cut 
through,  is  a  fuller  by  trade,  and  very  apt  to  get  drunk; 
had  on  a  half  worn  castor  hat,  black  silk  handkerchief, 
light  coloured  homespun  coat,  which  has  had  several  places 
cut  across  the  body,  and  sewed  up,  linsey  striped  jacket, 
coarse  tow  trowsers,  old  check  shirt,  and  old  shoes.  WILEY 
WOOD,  21  years  old,  round  faced,  black  strait  hair,  dark 
complexion,  has  a  hardy  countenance,  about  5  feet,  8  inches 
high,  well  set,  lisps  in  his  talk,  and  drinks  no  rum ;  had  on 
a  blue  sailor  jacket,  a  sheeps  black  homespun  under  ditto, 
without  sleeves,  old  striped  linen  trowsers,  new  pair  of 
shoes,  plain  steel  buckles  and  old  felt  hat.  Whoever  takes 
up  the  above  prisoners,  and  secures  them  in  any  goal,  and 
gives  notice  to  the  subscriber,  shall  receive  for  NEWLIN 
and  COCKRAN,  or  either  of  them,  Forty  Shillings  each, 
and  Twenty  Shillings  for  WOOD,  paid  by 

JOSIAH  CHATTIN,  Coaler. 

A  LIST  of  LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post-Office,  Phil- 
adelphia. 

C.     James  Crommey,  Joseph  Champneys,  Pilesgrove 

H.  William  Hannah,  Bordentown;  John  E.  Hopkins, 
Haddonfield 

K.  Thomas  Kennedy  (2)  Monmouth  County,  New- 
Jersey. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  3°9 

L.     Samuel  Leveston,  Mountholly. 

M.     David  Maxwell,  Monmouth,  N.  Jersey. 

R.     Dr.  Alexander  Ross,  Mountholly. 

T.     Jacob  Taggart,  Salem. 

Y.     David  Young,  Jersey. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2078,  October  20, 
1768. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

By  the  last  Vessel  from  London,  we  have  Advice  of  the 
Death  of  Mr.  AHIMAAZ  HARKER/  of  the  Small-Pox.  He 
was  a  Native  of  New-Jersey,  and  a  young  Man  of  a  good 
natural  Genius,  and  great  Urbanity 

A  Correspondent  from  New-Jersey  informs  us,  that  a 
few  Weeks  ago  a  pretty  extraordinary  Affair  happened  in 
his  Neighbourhood,  a  Ram  broke  into  a  Pasture  amongst 
some  Oxen,  one  of  which  he  attacked,  and  after  several 
Parries  between  them,  the  Ram  drew  a  few  Steps  back, 
and  ran  with  such  Violence  at  the  Ox,  that  the  latter 
dropped  down  and  died  instantly. 

(In  the  Account  of  the  Commencement  at  Princeton, 
inserted  in  the  Pennsylvania  Chronicle  extraordinary,  Page 
316,  the  first  Latin  Thesis  should  run  thus,  Quicunque  vere 
pii  sunt,  ideirco,  prce  omnibus,  aliis,  in  honore  habere 

debent,  instead  of in  honore  habero  debemus.) — The 

Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  &c.,  Extraordinary,  October  24- 
26,  1768. 

ALL  Persons  indebted  to  the  estate  of  Samuel  Wood- 
ruff, Esq;  late  of  Elizabeth-Town,  deceased,  either  by 

i  Son  of  the  Rev.  Samuel  Harker,  pastor  of  the  Presbyterian  church 
at  Black  River,  Roxbury,  Morris  county.  It  is  understood  that  Ahimaaz 
went  to  England  to  receive  ordination  at  the  hands  of  some  Bishop  of 
the  Church  of  England.  It  was  reported  that  he  and  his  father  were 
lost  at  sea  by  the  foundering  of  the  vessel  in  which  they  were  passen- 
gers for  England.  See  N.  J.  Archives,  XX.,  160. 


3IO  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

bond,  note,  or  book,  are  desired  to  make  immediate  pay- 
ment; and  all  persons  that  have  any  demands  against  the 
said  estate,  are  desired  to  send  in  their  accounts,  that  they 
may  be  adjusted  by  us. 

E.  Woodruff,  Administratrix;    Benjamin  Woodruff, 
Joseph  Woodruff,  and  Isaac  Woodruff,  Adminis- 
trators. 
Eliza.  Town,  Octo.  15,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
886,  October  24,  1768. 

To  be  sold  by  way  of  publick  Vendue,  on  Monday  the 
fourteenth  of  November  next,  at  10  o' Clock  in 

the  Forenoon,  on  the  Premises. 

A  LOT  of  Ground  with  a  very  good  new  Stone  House 
on  it,  containing  about  seven  or  eight  Acres  of  tillable 
Land,  bounding  in  the  Front  on  the  West  Side  of  Pas- 
saick  River,  and  in  the  Rear  on  the  main  Road  that  leads 
from  Newark  to  Ringwood,  just  below  the  Reef  of  the 
River,  and  almost  opposite  to  Mr.  John  Richards's.  It 
lies  very  convenient  for  a  Landing;  a  Tradesman  or  a 
Merchant;  and  is  the  Property  of  Isaac  Van  Rypen,  by 
whom  an  indisputable  Title  will  be  given  to  the  Purchaser. 
— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1347, 
October  24,  1768. 

NEW- YORK,  October  27. 
Extract  of  a  letter  from  Brunswick,  New-Jersey,  dated 

October  15.  (Inserted  by  Desire) 
"On  Wednesday  last  was  held  here  a  convention  of  the 
Church  Clergy  of  New-York  and  New- Jersey,  assisted  by 
delegates  from  several  neighbouring  provinces ;  on  which 
occasion,  a  sermon,  much  in  favour  of  American  Bishops, 
was  preached  by  the  Revd.  Mr.  Odell,  Missionary  of  Bur- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  311 

lington.  It  is  suspected  by  many,  that  a  principal  design 
of  the  late  frequent  and  numerous  conventions,  is  in  order 
to  a  spirited  application  to  the  powers  at  home,  upon  some 
supposed  abuses  of  the  Church,  in  two  neighbouring  col- 
onies, which  it  is  pretended  amount  almost  to  persecution. 
Is  it  not  to  the  last  degree  cruel  and  mean,  to  take  this 
opportunity  to  attack  us  on  this  matter,  at  a  time  when 
the  united  efforts  of  all  sects  are  so  necessary  in  the  com- 
mon cause  of  liberty  ? 

Four  Pounds  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  Burlington 
county,  New- Jersey,  near  Trenton,  on  the  28th  of  No- 
vember, 1768,  two  servant  boys,  viz.  Patrick  Lamb,  born 
in  Dublin,  about  1 5  years  of  age,  short,  thick  and  clumsey, 
speaks  very  hoarse,  has  short  brown  hair,  and  pitted  with 
the  small-pox :  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  brown 
jacket,  tow  shirt  and  trowsers,  felt  hat,  and  good  strong 
new  shoes,  tied  with  strings.  William  Jenkins,  born  in 
Bristol  or  Wales,  in  England,  about  20  years  of  age,  about 
5  feet  2  inches  high,  full  faced,  and  of  a  fair  complexion. 
He  came,  about  a  month  ago,  in  the  ship  Sally,  Captain 
Osman.  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a  blue  jacket  and 
breeches,  with  a  pair  of  old  trowsers  over  them,  old  pumps, 
with  buckles  in  them,  and  an  old  hat.  Whoever  takes  up 
the  above  servants,  and  secures  them,  so  that  their  master 
may  have  them  again,  shall  have  the  above  reward,  and 
all  reasonable  charges,  paid,  by  George  Douglass,  in  Phil- 
adelphia, or  Isaac  Pearson. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle, 
No.  94,  October  26-31,  1768. 

N.  J.  Mon-   ^      PURSUANT  to  an  order  of  the  hon.  John 

mouth.         j      Anderson  &  John  Taylor,  Esqrs;  two  of 

the  Judges  of  the  court  of  common  pleas,  of  the  province 

of  New- jersey :    Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  respective 


312  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

creditors  of  Michael  Henderson,  now  in  the  gaol  in  said 
county,  that  they  be  and  appear  on  Monday  the  I4th  day 
of  November  next,  at  12  o'clock  of  said  day,  at  the  house 
of  Hartshorn  Whites,  in  Freehold  to  shew  cause  (if  any 
they  have)  why  the  estate  of  the  said  debtor  should  not 
be  assigned  for  the  benefit  of  his  creditors;  and  his  per- 
son discharged  from  gaol,  agreeable  to  a  late  act  of  the 
legislature  of  the  said  province,  for  the  relief  of  insolvent 
debtors. — The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser, 
No.  1347,  October  27,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  October  27. 

One  of  our  Correspondents  writes  us  as  follows,  viz. 
Amwell,  (New-Jersey)  October  17,  1768. 

"On  Wednesday  the  5th  Inst.  a  melancholy  Accident 
happened  here.  On  the  Afternoon  of  said  Day,  Captain 
DANIEL  READING,  Son  of  the  Honourable  JOHN  READ- 
ING, Esq;  late  of  this  Place,  deceased,  and  two  other  Gen- 
tlemen, each  with  his  Fowling-Piece,  charged  with  small 
Shot,  went  out  to  divert  themselves,  in  the  Pursuit  of 
Game,  in  the  neighbouring  Woods.  And  they  having  dis- 
covered a  Squirrel  on  a  Tree,  one  of  the  Gentlemen  pre- 
sented; but  the  Object  moving,  he  took  down  his  Piece, 
and,  as  he  confidently  thinks,  half  cocked  it.  Whilst  they 
were  walking  about  the  Tree,  in  order  again  to  discover 
the  Game,  the  Gun  of  the  Gentleman,  who  had  presented, 
being  in  his  Hand,  accidentally  went  off,  and  Captain 
Reading  being  at  a  little  Distance,  in  a  Direction  nearly 
straight  before  the  Muzzle  of  the  Gun,  unhappily  received 
the  Charge  in  his  Right-arm,  rather  above  the  Joint  of  the 
Elbow,  which  not  only  lacerated  the  Flesh,  and  fractured 
the  Bone  where  it  struck,  but  broke  it  off  short,  a  little 
above  where  it  entered.  With  much  difficulty  he  got  home, 
in  most  excruciating  Pain,  which  continued  for  some  Days. 
Skilful  Surgeons  were  immediately  called  to  his  Relief, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  313 

who  willing,  agreeable  to  his  own  Desire,  and  that  of  his 
Friends,  to  use  their  utmost  Endeavours  to  save  his  Arm, 
did  not  proceed  to  an  Amputation.  Little  or  no  Fever  en- 
sued, and  after  a  few  Days  the  Pain  abated,  and  the 
wounded  Part  began  to  suppurate.  But  notwithstanding 
many  nattering  Symptoms  of  a  favourable  Issue,  yet,  on 
the  Morning  of  the  i$th  Instant,  he  unexpectedly  and  sud- 
denly expired,  without  any  visible  Mortification  in  the 
Part,  unless  livid  and  blackish  Streaks,  under  his  wounded 
Arm,  and  on  that  Side  might  be  judged  Indications  of  it. 

Captain  Reading's  placid,  easy,  open,  benevolent,  engag- 
ing Disposition  and  Conduct,  had  rendered  him  the  Object 
of  universal  Esteem  and  Affection  wherever  he  was 
known;  hence  his  Death  is  very  justly  and  greatly  regret- 
ted! It  is  not  only  an  unspeakable  Loss  to  a  deeply  af- 
flicted Widow,  and  a  large  Family  of  small  Children,  but 
to  the  particular  Society  to  which  he  belonged,  of  which 
he  was  a  very  useful  Member,  and  to  all  his  Acquaintance. 
He  was  one  of  the  most  loving  and  affectionate  Husbands, 
the  tenderest  of  Fathers,  and  a  steady  Friend;  and  his 
immature  and  unexpected  Death,  in  the  Prime  of  his  Days, 
and  in  the  Midst  of  Usefulness,  shews  the  Vanity  of  Man 
in  his  best  Estate,  and  the  great  Necessity  of  attending  to 
our  Lord's  Admonition,  "B.e  ye  also  ready,  for  in  such  an 
Hour  as  ye  think  not  the  Son  of  Man  cometh." 

It  is  said  the  Gun,  which  was  instrumental  in  the  above 
unhappy  Affair,  had  sundry  Times  before  gone  off  in  the 
same  unexpected  and  surprizing  Manner." 

RUN  away  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  Fairfield, 
Cumberland  county,  West  New- Jersey,  a  certain  John 
Davis,  5  feet  4  inches  high,  has  lightish  coloured  long  hair, 
curled,  by  trade  a  sadler;  had  on,  and  took  with  him,  a 
variety  of  clothes,  and  some  sadlers  tools  in  an  old  chest; 
he  went  away  with  two  labouring  men,  who  have  since 


314  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

been  seen  at  New-York,  and  from  thence  went  to  North 
Carolina.  Whoever  secures  said  Davis,  in  any  of  his 
Majesty's  goals,  shall  have  Four  Dollars  reward,  and  rea- 
sonable charges,  paid  by 

AARON  FITHIAN. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2079,  October  27, 
1768. 

Boston,  October  24.  Last  Monday  came  to  town  the 
Rev.  Dr.  Witherspoon,  president  of  the  college  of  New- 
Jersey.  On  Thursday  he  preached  the  weekly  lecture,  on 
Friday  he  preached  at  the  Rev.  Mr.  Pemberton's,  yester- 
day forenoon  at  the  old  brick,  and  in  the  afternoon  at  the 
old  south  meeting-house. 

To  be  sold,  a  tract  of  land  containing  1200  acres,  situ- 
ate in  the  forks  of  the  north  branch  of  Rariton-River,  in 
Somerset  counuty,  New-Jersey,  16  miles  from  New- 
Brunswick  landing,  bounded  easterly  by  Pepack  River, 
southerly  and  westerly  by  Allamatunk  River,  and  north- 
erly by  a  straight  line  from  one  river  to  the  other,  (either 
the  whole  together,  or  in  farms  of  two  or  three  hundred 
acres,  as  may  best  suit  the  purchasers)  at  public  vendue, 
on  the  premises,  on  Wednesday  the  seventh  day  of  Decem- 
ber next,  or  at  private  sale  any  time  before,  by  applying 
to  the  subscriber :  On  payment  of  the  one  fourth  part  of 
the  consideration  money,  a  reasonable  time  will  be  given 
for  the  payment  of  the  remainder.  On  the  south  easterly 
end  of  the  tract,  is  a  genteel  dwelling-house,  a  large  barn, 
and  stables,  a  very  good  garden  and  orchard.  The  great 
road  from  Brunswick  to  Black  River,  and  from  Elizabeth- 
Town  to  Delaware  River,  are  within  sight  of  the  house; 
a  large  grist  mill  within  three  hundred  yards  of  it.  This 
situation  is  pleasant  for  a  gentleman's  seat,  and  conve- 
nient for  a  country  store.  On  the  westerly  end  of  the 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3J5 

tract  is  a  farm  house,  barn,  stable,  garden,  and  orchard. 
About  seven  hundred  acres  of  this  tract  is  cleared;  one 
hundred  of  which  is  excellent  meadow,  the  rest  is  esteemed 
as  good  wheat  land  as  any  in  New- Jersey;  about  eighty 
acres  of  it  is  now  in  wheat,  the  remainder  of  the  tract  is 
well  timbered,  and  a  rich  swamp.  At  the  same  time  and 
place  (or  at  any  time  before  at  private  sale)  will  be  ex- 
posed at  public  vendue,  6  negroes,  about  100  head  of  horn 
cattle,  and  horses,  a  parcel  of  good  sheep  and  hogs,  about 
1000  bushels  of  wheat,  600  bushels  of  oats,  500  bushels 
of  indian  corn,  about  2000  Ib.  weight  of  flax,  and  about 
100  tuns  of  well  got  English  hay,  with  waggons,  carts, 
ploughs,  and  a  variety  of  very  good  farming  utensils.  For 
any  farther  particulars  relative  to  the  premises,  enquire 
thereon,  of 

JOHN  CAREY. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No, 
887,  October  31,  1768. 

Burlington  (Neiv- Jersey,)  October  12  [?],  1768. 

FOUR  POUNDS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  Etna  Furnace,  Burlington  County,  on 
Saturday  the  I5th  Day  of  October,  1768,  two  Servant 
Men,  the  one  named  DANIEL  DAYLEY,  aged  about  22 
Years,  five  Feet  high,  a  squatt  thick  Fellow,  round  faced, 
thick  lip'd,  black  Hair,  and  very  fawning  in  his  Speech, 
had  with  him  a  /ed  Jacket,  strip'd  Trousers,  a  good  Hat, 
and  several  other  Cloaths,  which  he  stole.  The  other 
named  JEREMIAH  DRISCOL,  about  the  same  Height  and 
Age,  grey  Eyes,  with  an  uncommon  Look  out  of  them,  a 
wide  Mouth,  black  Hair;  Had  on  a  spotted  Swanskin 
Jacket,  Ozenbrigs  Trowsers,  but  as  they  stole  several 
Clothes,  their  Dress  cannot  be  described :  Whoever  takes 
them  up,  and  secures  them  in  any  Goal,  so  that  they  may 


3l6  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

be  had  again,  shall  receive  FORTY  SHILLINGS,  for  each, 
paid  by 

CHARLES  READ 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1348,  October  31,  1768. 

RUN  away,  on  the  2ist  of  October  last,  from  the  sub- 
scriber, living  in  Little  Egg-Harbour  township,  New- 
Jersey,  a  Negroe  man,  named  Benjamin  Kipp;  had  on, 
an  ozenbrigs  shirt,  leather  breeches,  mixt  coloured  stock- 
ings, blue  outside  jacket,  grey  under  jacket,  and  a  felt  hat, 
bound  round  with  yellow  stuff;  and  took  with  him  a  pair 
of  trowsers,  and  a  silk  handkerchief.  Also  a  Mulattoe 
boy,  named  James  Wilson,  has  a  lock  of  white  hair  on  the 
back  part  of  his  head;  had  on  a  white  flannel  shirt,  leather 
breeches,  pale  blue  stockings,  a  felt  hat,  bound  with  red 
ferret,  two  blue  jackets,  and  a  pair  of  tow  trowsers.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  said  runaways,  so  as  their  mas- 
ter may  have  them  again,  shall  have  Five  Pounds  reward 
for  both,  or  Fifty  Shillings  for  either,  paid  by 

JOHN  WOOD. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2080,  November 
3,  1768. " 

A  Correspondent,  who  dates  his  letter  at  Burlington, 
writes  us,  that  the  Rencounter  between  an  Ox  and  a  RAM, 
mentioned  in  the  Chronicle  Extraordinary  of  Oct.  26, 
Page  340,  wherein  the  former  was  slain  on  the  Spot,  hap- 
pened in  that  Town,  before  a  Number  of  Spectators — 
And  adds  this  QUERE,  Whether  it  might  not  be  well  to 
train  a  Regiment  of  these  GENTLEMEN,  and  send  them  to 
the  Assistance  of  the  Boston-Men — for  I  think  the  Regi- 
ments arrived  there  may  very  justly  be  taken  for  GOVERN- 
MENT BULLS. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  96,  No- 
vember 7-14,  1768. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3r7 

To  be  SOLD,  on  very  low  Terms,  for  Cash, 
THE  Whole,  or  any  Part  of  1400  Acres  of  Proprietary 
.Rights,  or  unappropriated  Land,  in  the  Province  of  West 
New-Jersey.  Any  Person  inclinable  to  purchase,  may 
know  the  Terms,  by  applying  to  WILLIAM  Cox,  Chair-- 
maker, next  Door  below  the  Church,  in  Second-street,  or 
NICHOLAS  Cox,  Cordwainer,  in  Water-street  three  Doors 
above  Market-street. 

To  be  SOLD  by  the  SUBSCRIBER, 

Living  in  Dover,  in  the  county  of  Kent,  upon  Delaware. 
A  TRACT  OF  LAND,  situate  in  Salem  county,  in  the 
province  of  West- Jersey,  adjoining  to  the  town  of  Salem, 
extending  2  miles  on  a  navigable  creek,  that  ebbs  and 
flows  6  feet  perpendicular,  having  several  landings  be- 
longing to  the  premises  on  the  said  creek,  and  does  not 
exceed  30  miles  from  thence  to  Philadelphia  by  land  and 
36  by  water,  from  whence  the  markets  of  Philadelphia 
may  be  conveniently  attended;  and  about  4  miles  to  a 
Glass-house,  -where  are  settled  many  German  families'. 
The  said  tract  consists  of  sundry  sorts  of  land,  and  has 
many  valuable  improvements  thereon;  viz.  295  acres  of 
upland,  excellent  for  farming,  and  very  natural  to  English 
grass,  large  quantities  of  hay  being  cut  therefrom  annu- 
ally, having  thereon  a  large  2  story  brick  house,  two  brick 
kitchens,  and  a  large  framed  barn,  covered  with  cedar, 
and  sundry  other  outhouses  &c.  170  acres  oif  banked 
meadow,  most  part  proper  for  hemp;  the  whole  produc- 
ing fine  grass  for  mowing,  176  acres  of  marsh,  having  a 
fall  of  6  feet,  which  may  be  banked  and  drained  at  a  small 
expense,  and  converted  into  meadow;  and  1081  acres  of 
woodland,  well  timbered,  including  a  white  oak  swamp, 
containing  80  acres,  not  more  remarkable  for  the  fine  tim- 
ber of  several  sorts,  such  as  white  oak,  ash,  maple,  &c. 
which  it  produces  than  for  the  excessive  richness  of  the 


3l8  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

soil.  The  whole  contains  1722  acres,  and  will  make  sev- 
eral fine  farms  for  cultivation  and  grazing,  with  a  suffi- 
cient quantity  of  meadow  and  woodland  to  each  farm. 
Any  person  or  number  of  persons,  inclining  to  purchase 
the  whole,  may  have  the  payments  made  as  easy  as  can 
reasonably  be  expected,  upon  securing  the  same,  and  pay- 
ing interest.  The  premises  may  be  entered  upon  at  any 
time  from  the  first  of  January  next,  to  the  25th  of  March; 
For  further  particulars,  enquire  of  Benjamin  Chew,  Esq; 
Benjamin  Wyncoop,  Merchant  in  Philadelphia,  or  of  the 
subscriber,  JOHN  VINING. 

N.  B.  Also  to  be  sold  500  acres  of  woodland,  contig- 
uous to  the  above  tract ;  both  tracts  clear  of  quitrents,  and 
the  titles  indisputable. 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward, 

STOLEN  from  the  plantation  of  THOMAS  TALLMAN,  in 
the  township  of  Evesham,  and  county  of  Burlington,  and 
Western  Division  of  New  Jersey,  on  the  3ist  of  October 
last,  a  grey  HORSE,  with  a  bob  tail,  about  13  hands  and  an 
half  high,  about  10  years  old,  a  low  carriage,  paces  and 
trots,  and  has  a  mark  above  his  knee,  by  being  tied  head 
and  foot  with  a  rope.  Was  also  stolen,  three  large  SILVER 
SPOONS,  stamped  with  the  maker's  name,  J.  Leacock,  like- 
wise marked  TTH  on  the  handle;  and  a  large  pair  of 
carved  silver  shoe  buckles,  stamped  with  the  first  letters 
of  the  maker's  name  T.  A.  and  one  of  the  buckles  has  a 
piece  broke  off,  where  it  was  stamped,  also  sundry  wear- 
ing apparel. 

These  are  to  desire  all  Silversmiths,  and  others,  to 
whom  the  above  articles  may  be  offered  for  sale  to  stop 
them,  and  secure  the  thief;  and  whosoever  takes  up  and 
secures  the  said  HORSE,  so  that  the  owner  may  have  him 
again,  shall  have  Forty  Shillings,  for  the  SPOONS  and 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3  19 

BUCKLES,  Twenty  Shillings,  and  for  the  THIEF,  Forty 
Shillings,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

THOMAS  TALLMAN. 

N.  B.  The  person  who  is  supposed  to  have  stolen  the 
above  horse  and  articles,  is  named  Thomas  Robertson, 
born  in  Ireland,  about  20  years  of  age,  5  feet  5  inches 
high;  had  on  a  blue  coat  and  jacket,  also  a  trimmed  jacket, 
without  sleeves:  He  came  into  the  country  about  two 
years  ago  with  a  gentleman  as  his  servant. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette,  No.  2081,  November  10,  1768. 

To  be  SOLD  or  LET  for  a  term  of  years, 
A  BREW-HOUSE  and  MALT-HOUSE,  with  the  imple- 
ments in  order  for  carrying  on  both  branches  of  business. 
For  terms  inquire  of  PETER  WORRALL,  in  Burlington,  or 
WILLIAM  DILLWYN,  in  Woodbury. — Postscript  to  the 
Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  96,  for  November  14,  1768. 

To  be  Rented,  and  may  be  entered  on  the  2Oth  of  April 

next, 

A  Certain  Forge  consisting  of  four  fires  and  two  ham- 
mers, with  a  grist-mill  and  saw  mill,  and  all  necessary 
buildings,  situate  in  the  lower  part  of  Sussex  county, 
West  New- Jersey,  on  Musconetcung  river,  known  by  the 
name  of  Greenwich  Forge,  with  about  1800  acres  of  land, 
and  conveniently  situated  to  several  furnaces.  There  will 
also  be  rented,  with  the  works,  seven  Negro  men,  who 
have  been  employed  for  many  years  past  in  the  Forge,  and 
understand  the  making  of  iron.  For  terms  apply  to  HUGH 
HUGHES,  on  the  premises. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  House  and  Lot,  in  the  town  of  Salem,  in  West  New- 
Jersey,  now  in  the  tenure  of  Robert  Johnson,  Esq ;  the 


32O  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

\ 

lot  is  23  feet  6  inches  in  front,  on  the  street  leading  from 
the  court-house  to  the  great  bridge,  and  extends  above 
250  feet  back.  The  house  twenty  feet  front,  two  stories 
high,  two  rooms  on  the  first,  and  three  on  the  second  floor, 
with  good  garrets,  and  cellars  under  the  whole  house,  a 
large  kitchen  back,  a  large  oven  and  good  well  in  the  yard, 
and  a  garden  &c.  Whoever  wants  to  purchase  the  same, 
may  see  the  house  and  lot,  and  know  the  terms  of  sale,  by 
applying  to  said  Johnson,  on  the  premises,  or  to  John 
Mitchell,  in  Philadelphia,  who  will  give  an  undoubted 
title  to  the  same.  Six  or  twelve  months  credit  will  be 
given  if  required. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  97, 
November  14-21,  1768. 

To  be  sold,  or  let  for  a  Term  of  Years. 
A  Good  Fulling-Mill,  with  all  the  Utensils  belonging 
to  the  same,  fitting  for  carrying  on  the  Fulling  Business 
in  the  best  Manner;  there  is  a  Dwelling-House,  Barn, 
with  upwards  of  six  Acres  of  very  good  Land,  (Orchard 
and  Meadow)  adjoining  said  Mill  and  Stream,  which  is 
on  Byram  River,  about  two  or  three  Miles  from  Byram 
Landing,  and  well  situated  for  Custom,  being  a  noted  Mill 
for  near  forty  Years  past;  the  Stream  is  as  good  as  any 
in  the  Country  for  constancy,  and  the  Mill  hath  been  lately 
rebuilt.  Any  Person  who  inclines  to  purchase, ,  or  rent 
said  mill  and  land,  may  apply  to  the  Subscriber,  near  the 
Premises,  who  will  agree  for  the  same  on  reasonable 
Terms. 

JOHN  CLAP  p. 

LOST,  at  Ringwood  Iron- Works, 
ON  the  1 6th  of  May  last,  a  Pinchbeck  WATCH,  with  a 
single  Case,  Maker's  Name,  Par.  Moore,  London;    No. 
1982.    Whoever  will  deliver  the  Watch  to  Robert  Cham- 
bers, of  Mendem,  in  the  County  of  Morris,  and  Province 


1^68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  321 

of  New-Jersey,  shall  receive  Three  Dollars  Reward. — 
The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  889, 
November  14,  1768. 

November  3,  1768. 

BY  Virtue  of  a  Writ  of  Fieri  Facias,  to  me  the  Sheriff 
of  Monmouth  County,  in  East  New-Jersey,  directed 
against  the  Goods  and  Chattels,  Lands  and  Tenements  of 
David  Ketcham,  and  pursuant  thereto,  I  have  taken  sun- 
dries, such  as  Cattle,  Horses,  Hogs,  Sheep,  Negroes,  Far- 
mers Utensils,  Household  Goods,  also  the  Plantation 
whereon  the  said  Ketcham  now  lives,  containing  about 
Four  Hundred  Acres  of  Land,  chiefly  good,  with  a  Saw- 
mill and  Grist-Mill  newly  built;  two  good  Dwelling- 
Houses,  two  Orchards,  plenty  of  Timber,  and  well  water- 
ed; situate  in  the  Township  of  Shrewsbury,  being  well 
situated  for  a  Store,  or  any  other  Publick  Business;  the 
said  Mills  never  want  Water  in  the  dryest  Season :  Now 
these  are  to  give  Notice,  that  the  aforesaid  Goods  and 
Chattels,  Lands  and  Tenements,  will  be  sold  by  Way  of 
Publick  Vendue,  on  Tuesday  the  Sixth  Day  of  Decem- 
ber next,  on  the  Premises.  The  Lands  will  be  sold  either 
in  the  Whole,  or  in  Parcels,  as  best  suits  the  Purchaser. 
The  Vendue  will  begin  at  Nine  of  the  Clock  in  the  Fore- 
noon of  said  Day,  at  which  Time  and  Place,  the  Condi- 
tions will  be  made  known, 

By  me  THOMAS  LEONARD,  Sheriff. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1350,  November  14,  1768. 

Nezv-York,  November  17.  His  Excellency  William 
Franklin,  Esc^;  Governor  of  New- Jersey,  the  Hon.  Fred- 
erick Smyth,  Esq;  Chief  Justice  of  New-Jersey,  returned 
here  a  few  Days  ago  from  Fort  Stanwix,  where  they  have 


322  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

been  attending  the  Congress  held  by  the  Hon.  Sir  William 
Johnson,  Bart,  with  the  Six  United  Nations  and  their 
Tributaries. 

Five  Dollars  Reward, 

MADE  his  escape  from  the  subscriber,  on  Monday  night 
the  1 4th  instant,  from  Mr.  Butler's,  at  South- Amboy  ferry 
stage  house,  a  prisoner  for  theft,  who  had  some  time  be- 
fore been  taken  up,  the  stolen  goods  found  upon  him,  and 
confined  in  Philadelphia  gaol,  on  an  advertisement,  where- 
in the  person  of  the  thief  is  thus  described,  viz.  He  calls 
himself  William  Green,  and  gave  the  following  account, 
That  he  is  an  Englishman,  a  fuller  by  trade,  sail'd  from 
England  in  April  last,  arrived  at  Philadelphia,  came  from 
thence  enquiring  for  employment,  thro'  New-Jersey  and 
New- York,  from  whence  he  went  to  Greenwich  in  Con- 
necticut, where  he  was  hired  by  the  subscriber  for  a  month. 

JOSEPH  GALPIN 
JOHN  GREEN 
Greenwich  in  Connecticut,  November  17,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1350,  November  17,  1768. 

NEW-YORK. 

Nov.  14.  Saturday  last,  his  Majesty's  Ship  Hussar, 
arrived  at  Sandy-Hook,  and  Yesterday  came  up  here: 
She  was  Convoy  to  the  Troops  for  Boston  from  Ireland ; 
so  that,  though  no  Mention  is  made  of  the  Arrival  of 
those  Troops  at  Boston  on  Monday  last,  yet  we  presume 
they  are  arrived  there  since. 

PHILADELPHIA,  November  17 

Since  our  last  Mrs.  RACHEL  WILSON,  an  eminent 
Preacher  among  Friends,  who  lately  arrived  here,  in  Cap- 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  323 

tain  Falconer  from  England,  set  out  by  Land  for  South- 
Carolina She  preached  several  Times  in  this 

Province  and  New-Jersey,  to  the  great  Satisfaction  of 
Thousands  of  well-disposed  People  of  all  Denominations. 
—The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2082,  November  17, 
1768. 

THE  creditors  of  RICHARD  READING,  late  of  Amwell 
in  New-Jersey,  are  earnestly  requested  to  furnish  the  sub- 
scribers, acting  assignees  in  trust,  for  the  use  of  said  cred- 
itors, with  their  accounts  legally  proved,  in  order  that  the 
first  dividend  may  be  struck  by 

JOHN  Cox,  Jun.  )      Acting 

THOMAS  PRYER,  Jun    {  Assignees. — 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1354,  November 
17,  1768. 

Six  POUNDS  Reward 

Burlington,  (New- Jersey),  November  8,  1768. 
RUN-AWAY  from  ETNA  Furnace,  Burlington  County, 
on  Saturday  the  I5th  Day  of  October,  1768,  Three  Ser- 
vant Men,  one  named  DANIEL  DAYLY,  aged  about  22 
Years,  born  in  Ireland,  about  5  Feet  2  Inches  high,  a  squatt 
thick  Fellow,  round  broad  faced,  thick  lipped,  black  Hair, 
and  very  fawning  in  his  Speech :  Had  with  him,  a  red 
Jacket,  striped  Trowsers,  a  good  Hat.  and  several  other 
Cloaths,  which  he  stole:  He  run-away  about  12  Months 
ago,  was  at  Ringzvood  and  other  Iron- Works,  and  then 
chang'd  his  Name  to  John  or  James  Coffee;  and  when  at 
Salisberry,  to  Samuel  Wickstaif,  from  whence  it  may  be 
supposed  all  Three  will  change  their  Names.  One  other 
named  JEREMIAH  DRISCOL,  about  the  same  Height  and 
age,  grey  Eyes,  which  are  weak,  a  wide  Mouth,  black 
Hair,  slow  of  Speech,  had  on  a  spotted  Swanskin  Jacket, 
Oznabrigs  Trousers :  The  other  went  off  in  August  last, 


324  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

and  is  named  RANDAL  MACDONALD,  aged  about  40  Years, 
round  faced,  black  Eyes  and  Hair,  and  large  Beard,  hard 
of  Hearing;  about  5  Feet  2  Inches  high,  very  silent  when 
sober,  and  talkative  when  drunk  :  He  is  well  known  in  the 
Counties  of  Essex  and  Morris;  he  is  by  Trade  a  Bloomer 
and  Finer.  Whosoever  takes  up  any  of  the  said  Servants, 
and  secures  them  in  any  Goal  of  New- Jersey  or  New-York, 
shall  receive  FORTY  SHILLINGS  Reward,  and  reasonable 
Charges,  paid  by 

CHARLES  READ. 

#\  Wanted  at  said  Furnace  a  good  Keeper  or  person 
accomplished  in  Castings,  and  a  middle  aged  Woman  not 
subject  to  Liquors;  fit  to  be  entrusted  with  the  Care  of  a 
large  Family  but  not  to  Cook. — The  New  York  Gazette 
or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1351,  November  21,  1768. 

New-York,  zjth  Nov.  The  following  Answer  to  the 
Extract  of  a  Letter  from  New-Brunswick,  dated  Octo. 
1 5th,  inserted  in  our  Paper  of  Octo.  27th,  having  been 
so  long  delay'd  for  Want  of  Room. 

New-Brunswick,  $ist  Octo.  1768. 

Mr.  HOLT, 

As  you  were  pleased  in  your  last  JOURNAL  to  insert  an 
Extract  of  a  Letter  from  hence,  which  many  of  your  Read- 
ers must  undoubtedly  have  taken  particular  Notice  of,  I 
hope  you  will  give  the  following  Animadversions  a  Place 
in  your  next. 

IN  the  first  Place  then,  give  me  Leave  to  observe,  That 
the  Letter,  in  all  Probability,  was  not  written  from  Bruns- 
wick, but  by  some  stanch  True  Blue  in  the  City  of  New- 
York,  who  had  barely  heard  of  the  Sermon,  at  which  I 
was  present;  or  else,  it  is  most  likely  the  Writer  would 
have  observed  upon  it,  That  it  incontestibly  proved  both 
the  Expediency  and  Necessity  of  the  National  Religion's 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  325 

being  properly  supported  in  this  Country;  which  could 
not  otherwise  be  done,  than  by  the  Introduction  of  Bish- 
ops; nor  would  he  have  failed  to  applaud  so  masterly  a 
Composition. 

In  the  second  Place,  he  insinuates,  That  Conventions 
have  lately  been  held  much  more  frequently  than  they  used 
to  be :  The  Contrary  to  which,  especially  in  this  Govern- 
ment, he  must  have  been  convinced  of,  had  he  been  an  In- 
habitant of  New  Brunswick:  Indeed  it  is  difficult  to  con- 
ceive how  the  most  flaming  Independent  of  them  all  would 
have  the  Face  to  mention  the  frequent  and  numerous 
Meetings  of  the  Episcopal  Clergy,  when  the  Presbyterian 
Synods,  &c.  (convened  by  nobody  knows  what  Author- 
ity) recur  almost  as  frequently  as  the  new  Moons,  at 
which  their  Teachers  are  almost  as  numerous  as  the  Lo- 
custs of  Egypt. 

In  the  third  Place,  I  dare  venture  to  affirm,  That  there 
is  not  a  single  Resident  in  this  City — Blush,  if  it  be  pos- 
sible, ye  Whigs  of  New-York,  ye  Centinels  of  Philadel- 
phia, ye  Founts  of  Connecticut,  and  ye  Ram-Chickens  of 
Boston — who  has  the  Hardiness  even  to  insinuate,  That 
"the  Church  in  two  neighbouring  Colonies,"  and  many 
Colonies  beside,  has  not  repeatedly  met  with,  does  not 
every  Day  meet  with,  more  than  "supposed  Abuses,  with 
Abuses  which  are  intolerable;  and,  if  intolerable,  then  they 
are  Abuses  which  amount  not  only  "almost  to  Persecu- 
tion," but  which  have  the  very  Life,  Spirit,  Soul  and  Es- 
sence of  Persecution. 

In  the  fourth  Place,  seeing  that  Mode  of  Religion  which 
the  Members  of  the  Convention  profess,  labours  under 
such  Abuses,  with  what  Shadow  of  Justice  can  they  be 
blamed  for  making  "a  spirited  Application  to  the  Powers 
at  home,"  to  have  those  Abuses  removed?  Whether  this 
was  their  principal  Design,"  it  is  highly  probable  the  Let- 


326  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

ter  Writer  knows  no  more  than  myself:  But  I  can  tell 
both  him  and  them,  that  if  they  neglected  to  do  it,  they 
were  highly  culpable.  And  if  such  "spirited  Application," 
when  made  to  the  "powers  at  home,"  does  not  meet  with 
a  suitable  Return  (as  who  knows  what  Attention  may  be 
paid  to  any  Application  for  Redress  of  Grievances,  by  a 

pusillanimous  spiritless  Administration?)  as  his  M y 

declares  in  their  Favour,  my  Advice  should  be,  to  make 
Application  to  Powers  which  are  not  at  home,  to  any  Prot- 
estant Powers,  where  the  Church  is  truly  Episcopal;  to 
solicit  their  Protection;  and  to  use  all  honest  Endeavours 
to  procure  a  Bishop  from  some  other  Government  than 
the  British,  if  the  British  Government  will  not  afford 
them  Means  for  their  Existence  and  Preservation.  Self- 
Defence  is  the  strongest  Principle  in  our  Nature;  and,  in 
the  Opinion  of  a  Layman,  Reason,  Law,  and  Equity,  all 
concur,  in  the  present  Instance,  to  push  them  forward  to 
the  attaining  of  an  American  Episcopate;  which  it  is  pre- 
sumed may  even  thus  be  effected,  without  any  Disadvan- 
tage to  the  State;  without  any  Impeachment  of  their  Loy- 
alty to  the  best,  the  most  humane,  the  most  religious  of 
Kings;  without  any  Diminution  of  their  Fidelity  to  the 
Church  of  England;  and  with  the  greatest  Emolument  to 
the  Members  of  that  Church  in  America.  As  for  the  Cru- 
elty and  Meanness  which  the  Letter- Writer  speaks  of,  it  is 
not  easy  for  me  to  conceive  what  he  intends  by  them.  They 
may  perhaps  be  understood  by  Independents  who  live  in 
the  perpetual  Exercise  of  them,  but  can  convey  no  distinct 
Idea  to  a  Churchman.  But  it  is  much  more  easy  to  appre- 
hend his  Meaning  when  he  talks  about  attacking  Us — for 
who  knows  not  from  what  WE  sprang,  what  WE  always 
have  been,  what  WE  are  at  this  Day,  and  what  WE  are 
likely  to  continue  to  be  to  the  End  of  the  Chapter  ?  Nor 
is  it  difficult  to  find  out  his  Meaning  when  he  tells  us, 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  327 

That  the  united  Efforts  of  all  SECTS  are  necessary  at  this 
Time,  in  the  common  Cause  of  Liberty:  i.  e.  (as  I  under- 
stand his  Words)  it  is  necessary  for  all  other  Denomina- 
tions to  confederate  against  the  Church  of  England,  the 
only  Church  consisting  originally  of  British  Subjects,  (for 
She  alone  in  this  Country  is  of  no  sect)  lest  the  Church 
of  England  should  be  indulged  with  Privileges  equal  to 
those  which  all  Sectaries  enjoy  in  the  most  ample  Man- 
ner, and  which  all  Churchmen  are  so  far  from  wishing  to 
see  abridged,  that  they  heartily  desire  they  may  always 
be  continued  to  them  in  their  utmost  Latitude  and  Extent. 
I  make  no  Reflections  on  the  cjifferent  Behaviour  of 
Churchmen  and  Dissenters  in  this  Matter;  tho'  I  can 
hardly  expect  that  the  Reader  will  have  equal  Forbear- 
ance. 

And  lastly,  as  for  the  Trumpet  of  Disaffection,  which 
he  blows  at  the  Poop  of  his  Performance,  I  dare  aver  that 
no  true  Churchman  will  ever  dance  to  his  Music,  let  him 
even  distend  his  Buccinators  till  they  burst,  or  break  his 
Wind  in  the  fruitless  Effort.  Peccet  ad  extremum  riden- 
dus,  et  illia  ducat. — Supplement  to  the  New  York  Journal 
or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1351,  November  24,  1768. 

The  SUBSCRIBER,  living  in  Hanover  township,  Burling- 
ton county,  has  to  dispose  of,  a  likely  NEGROE  BOY,  about 
14  years  old,  has  had  the  small  pox,  and  has  been  brought 
up  to  farming  business. 

THOMAS  EMLAY 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2083,  November 
24,  1768. 

New-York,  November  28.  Thursday  last  Col.  Crog- 
han,  Commissioner  for  Indian  Affairs  under  Sir  William 
Johnson,  arrived  in  this  City,  from  the  late  Congress,  in 
his  way  to  Virginia:  He  has  brought  with  him,  one 


328  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Lewis  Andrews,  who  was  a  Soldier  in  the  Jersey  Force, 
and  taken  in  the  Year  1763,  by  the  Indians,  near  Lake 
Erie,  in  his  Way  to  Detroit,  and  had  been  kept  Prisoner 
among  the  Senecas  ever  since.  He  says,  they  used  him 
tolerably  well,  and  at  the  late  Congress  happily  got  re- 
leas'd,  and  is  now  returning  to  his  Friends  near  Burling- 
ton. 

Now  on  Sale  at  the  New-Printing  Office  in  Beaver  Street, 
POOR  ROGER'S  American  Country 

ALMANACK 
For  the  Year  1769: 


Also  to  be  sold  at  the  same  Place, 

The  New-Jersey  ALMANACK, 
By  COPERNICUS  WEATHER-GUESSER, 

And  Dutch  ALMANACKS  for  1769 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1352,  November  28,  1768. 

To  BE  SOLD,  BY 

EZEKIEL  FORMAN, 

Living  in  Princetown,  in  the  Province  of  New- Jersey, 
(at  private  Sale  only,)  the  following  Tracts  of  LAND, 
MILLS,  &c. 

THE  noted,  valuable,  and  pleasant  farm  whereon  he 
now  lives,  containing  310  acres  of  land,  about  150  of 
which  is  well  timbered,  and  a  sufficient  quantity  of  good 
meadow  ground.  The  buildings  and  improvements  are 
nearly  as  follows,  viz.  A  stone  dwelling  house  two  stories 
high,  ninety  feet  in  length,  by  twenty-five;  five  rooms  on 
the  lower  floor,  and  as  many  fire-places ;  six  rooms  on  the 
second  floor  (exclusive  of  the  servants  lodging  rooms) 
three  of  which  have  fire-places;  with  one  of  the  best  and 
most  convenient  cellars  and  dairy  room;  the  whole,  plain, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  329 

but  neatly  finished;  to  which  there  is  as  good  a  kitchen 
garden  as  a  purchaser  could  wish  to  have,  two  hundred 
and  thirty  two  feet  in  length,  by  one  hundred  and  twenty, 
boarded  round  in  the  best  manner  with  white  cedar  boards, 
and  red  cedar  posts;  the  front  neatly  paled.  A  well  fin- 
ished Dutch  barn,  forty  four  by  forty  feet;  with  a  build- 
ing adjoining  it,  principally  calculated  for  stabling  horn 
cattle,  forty  four  by  twenty  two  feet,  which  will  conve- 
niently hold  twelve  or  fourteen  ton  of  hay  over  head.  A 
good  waggon  house,  a  frame  cider  house,  thirty  two  by 
twenty  four  feet,  a  wheel  mill  and  screw  press;  all  the 
works  covered,  and  granaries  over  head  fitted  for  differ- 
ent sorts  of  grain,  also  for  housing  of  apples,  &c.  One 
of  the  best  framed  corn  cribs,  large  enough  to  hold  a  thou- 
sand bushels  of  corn;  a  poultry  house  conveniently  fin- 
ished, twenty  by  fourteen  feet;  large  fine  pole  barracks, 
covered  with  cedar;  all  the  buildings  new,  covered  with 
cedar,  and  in  the  best  repair.  A  good  apple  orchard  of 
the  best  grafted  fruit,  viz.  Pippin,  spitzenbergh,  green 
apple,  red  streak,  house  apple,  vandevere,  &c.  also  the  com- 
mon fruit  of  ungrafted  trees;  a  young  peach  orchard  of 
six  hundred  trees,  a  fine  collection  of  cherries  in  perfec- 
tion, (meaning  in  the  season  of  them)  and  .a  nursery  com- 
ing on  of  the  best  grafted  fruit,  plumbs,  pears,  cherries, 
&c.  With  as  good  water  as  in  the  world,  both  from  a  well 
and  a  spring,  near  the  house;  pleasantly  situated  on  the 
main  road  between  Philadelphia,  and  New- York,  and 
nearly  in  the  center. 

ALSO,  a  set  of  mills,  near  Kingston,  in  said  province, 
fifteen  miles  from  Trenton,  and  same  distance  from 
Brunswick ;  two  pair  of  stones,  in ,  good  repair,  conve- 
niently situated  for  merchant  and  country  work.  Also,  a 
house  and  lot  in  Princeton,  very  convenient  for  a  mer- 
chant's shop,  or  tradesman;  said  house  will  be  rented  if 


330  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

not  sold  before  next  spring.  It  is  the  house  wherein  the 
said  Forman  formerly  kept  store,  and  supposed  to  be  the 
best  stand  for  business  in  the  town;  the  shelves  are  all 
standing,  and  is  perhaps  one  of  the  best  store  rooms  to 
be  found;  there  is  also  upon  said  lot  a  good  ware-house, 
and  smoke  house.  Also  a  house  and  lot  in  Kingston,  very 
convenient  for  a  tavern ;  the  best  house  in  that  town,  and 
will  be  sold  for  less  than  half  its  value,  if  such  a*  purchaser 
offers.  Also  a  tract  of  wood  land  of  1 50  acres,  lying  near 
South  River  bridge,  and  within  half  a  mile  of  the  river. 
Good  bonds,  upon  interest,  will  be  taken  for  the  whole, 
or  any  part  of  the  purchase  money,  as  may  best  suit  the 
purchaser. — The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Adver- 
tiser, No.  1352,  December  i,  1768. 

PHILADELPHIA,  December  i. 

On  Tuesday  last  at  the  Anniversary  COMMENCEMENT 
in  the  College  of  this  City,  the  following  Gentlemen  were 
admitted  to  their  Degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  viz 
WILLIAM  BINGHAM 

BENJAMIN  DUFFIELD 

-   of  Philadelphia 
THOMAS  HALL 

GEORGE  NOARTH 
JONATHAN  EASTON,  of  Rhode  Island, 
DANIEL  KUHN,  of  Lancaster. 
CHRISTIAN  STREIGHT,  of  New  Jersey.1 
BENJAMIN  VINING,  of  Dover. 

And  at  the  same  time  Mr.  THOMAS  COOMBE,  junior,  of 
Philadelphia  (now  in  England)  was  admitted  to  the  De- 
gree of  Master  of  Arts. 

The  Exercises  were  as  follows,  viz. 
i.     A  Latin  Salutatory  Oration,  by  Mr.  Easton 

i  Christian  Streydt  and  Ursula,  his  wife,  came  to  America  from  Ger- 
many before  1720.  Christian  Streight.  who  graduated  from  the  Phila- 
delphia College  in  1768,  was  pastor  of  the  Lutheran  churches  at  Easton, 
Pa,:  1769-1779,  and  Greenwich,  N.  J.,  1773-1777. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  33 l 

2.  An    English    Oration,    on   public   spirit,    by    Mr. 
Streight. 

3.  A  Latin  Syllogistic  Dispute — Utram  mens  humano 
fit  immor talis?    (Mr.  Bingham  Respond.    Messieurs  Vin- 
ing,  Streight  and  Noarth  Oppon.) 

ON  the  23d  of  November,  at  night,  the  house  of  the 
subscriber,  in  Deptford  township,  Gloucester  county,  was 
broke  open,  and  robbed  of  19  dollars,  and  a  pocket  book, 
with  the  subscriber's  name  worked  on  it,  in  which  was 
some  small  money,  the  sum  not  certain;  there  was  also 
taken  away,  a  beaver  hat,  a  fine  shirt,  a  blue  broadcloth 
coat,  lined  with  white,  half  trimmed,  the  button-holes 
worked  of  a  lighter  colour,  with  sundry  other  things.  The 
robbery  is  supposed  to  have  been  committed  by  one  CAMP- 
BELL, a  Scotchman,  who  was  lately  brought  out  of  Phila- 
delphia goal,  and  ran  away  from  his  master  at  Marcus- 
Hook,  and  is  thought  to  be  gone  towards  New  York. 
Whoever  secures  the  thief,  with  the  goods  and  money,  so 
as  he  be  brought  to  justice,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  re- 
ward, paid  by 

JOHN  PATTERSON 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2084,  December  i, 
1768. 

Greenwich  in  Connecticut,  Nov.   17,   1768. 

FIVE  DOLLARS  Reward. 

MADE  his,  escape  from  the  subscriber,  on  Monday  night, 
the  1 4th  instant,  from  Mr.  Butler's,  at  South- Amboy 
ferry  stage  house,  a  prisoner  for  theft,  who  had  some  time 
before  been  taken  up,  the  stolen  goods  found  upon  him, 
and  confined  in  Philadelphia  goal  on  an  advertisement, 
wherein  the  person  of  the  thief  is  thus  described,  viz. — 
He  calls  himself  William  Green,  and  gave  the  following 
account,  That  he  is  an  Englishman,  a  fuller  by  trade,  sailed 


332  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

from  England  in  April  last,  arrived  at  Philadelphia,  came 
from  thence,  inquiring  for  employment,  through  New- 
Jersey  and  New- York,  from  whence  he  went  to  Green- 
wich in  Connecticut,  where  he  was  hired  by  the  subscriber 

for  a  month.    He  is  a  slender,  middle-sized  man 

And  whereas  the  subscriber,  on  notice  of  the  confinement 
of  the  said  thief,  applied,  received  him  from  the  goal, 
(together  with  the  goods  he  had  stolen)  and  was  conduct- 
ing him  to  Connecticut,  to  receive  his  trial;  at  the  ferry 
house  aforesaid,  at  his  earnest  request  the  irons,  which 
hurt  and  galled  his  wrists  were  taken  off;  when  after- 
wards (the  subscriber  being  at  supper)  a  man  at  the  table 
was  taken  ill,  and  died  within  three  or  four  minutes  after, 
which  occasioned  some  hurry,  and  engaged  the  attention 
of  the  company — during  which  the  prisoner  made  his  es- 
cape. He  has  the  additional  mark,  to  the  above  descrip- 
tion— that  his  wrists  are  galled.  He  had  no  cash  with 
him.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  the  said  prisoner,  or 
delivers  him  to  either  of  us  the  subscribers,  shall  receive 
the  above  reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges. 

JOSEPH  GALPIN. 
JOHN  GREEN. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels  and  others  are  forewarned 
not  to  harbour,  conceal,  or  carry  off  said  Green  at  their 
peril. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  99,  December  5, 
1767. 

Now  in  the  Press,  and  will  shortly  be  published,  THE 
HERMIT  OF  NEW-JERSEY,  a  COLLECTION  OF  POETI- 
CAL ESSAYS,  consisting  of  several  FUGITIVE  PIECES,  an 
ODE  to  LIBERTY,  and  a  DIALOGUE,  between  Lorenzo 
and  the  Hermit,  on  HUMAN  HAPPINESS.1 

iHildeburn  gives  (2454)  the  lined-off  title  as  follows:  Liberty,  |  a  | 
1'oem,  |  lately  found  in  a  bundle  of  papers.  |  said  to  be  written  by  | 
A  Hermit  in  New- Jersey.  I  ...  I  ...  I  ...  I  Philadelphia:  |  Printed 
by  William  Goddard,  in  Market- Street.  I  MDCCLXIX.  |  Sm.  4to,  pp.  12. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  333 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  PLANTATION,  containing  one  hundred  acres,  in  the 
Township  of  Hopewell,  Hunterdon  County,  New-Jersey, 
eight  miles  from  Trenton,  situate  with  a  large  and  beau- 
tiful prospect  on  the  river  Delaware,  near  good  spring  and 
summer  fisheries,  and  varieties  of  water-fowl  in  their  sea- 
son; it  was  anciently  known  by  the  name  of  Farmer's 
Ferry,  good  crafts  to  go  with  the  place.  The  soil  is  cer- 
tain for  winter  or  summer  grain,  and  a  considerable  part 
of  it  is  new,  only  in  the  first  crop;  a  new  meadow,  and 
more  can  easily  be  made;  a  bearing  orchard;  a  commo- 
dious garden,  and  the  fencing  mostly  new ;  a  frame  house, 
lately  repaired,  with  a  cellar,  a  Unto,  with  two  rooms  on  a 
floor,  a  kitchen  and  draw-well  near;  a  large  and  conve- 
nient black-smith's  shop,  with  two  hearths,  coal-house  and 
waggon-house,  all  of  stone,  and  newly  built,  with  a  log 
barn  and  stable.  Also  100  acres,  chiefly  wood-land,  well- 
timbered,  part  of  that  valuable  tract  of  Garret  Johnson, 
deceased,  contiguous  to  the  aforesaid  land.  Any  person 
inclining  to  purchase  one  or  both,  or  part  of  either,  may 
enter  on  the  premises  this  winter  or  next  spring,  and  have 
them  on  easy  purchase,  by  applying  to 

HENRY  MARGERUM. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  100,  December 
5-12,  1768. 

RuN-away  last  July  from  Hanover,  in  Morris  County, 
a  Negro  Man  named  FRANK,  a  stout  able  Fellow;  he  talks 
the  English,  Dutch,  Spanish,  and  Danish  Languages ;  has 
lost  one  of  his  Eyes,  and  wears  a  Rag  over  it.  Has  been 
seen  at  Elizabeth-Town,  and  Pompton,  and  lately  has 
crossed  Passaick  River,  at  Newark,  by  the  Assistance  of 
two  of  Capt.  Kennedy's  Negroes.  This  Fellow  is  very 
artful  and  cunning,  and  has  escaped  twice  from  Persons 


334  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1768 

who  took  him  up.  Whoever  secures  him  so  that  his  Mas- 
ter may  have  him  again  shall  receive  Forty  Shillings  Re- 
ward, and  all  reasonable  Charges,  from  Mr.  Kelly,  in  New- 
York,  or  the  Subscriber,  in  Morris  County. 

P.  DARCEY. 

Essex,  in  East-New-Jersey. 

WHEREAS  the  Proprietors  of  Newark  Mountain  Pur- 
chase, have  agreed  to  divide  their  Lands,  lying  between 
the  first  Mountain  and  Passaick  River :  Notice  is  hereby 
given,  to  all  Persons  that  have  any  Right  in  said  Purchase, 
to  apply  to  John  Dod,  at  Newark  Mountains,  on  or  before 
the  6th  of  January,  1769;  there,  and  then,  to  comply  with 
the  Constitution  of  said  Purchase,  or  else  expect  they  ex- 
clude themselves  by  refusing. — The  New  York  Gazette 
or  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  892,  December  5,  1768. 
• 

MRS.  E  STOGDON,  Widow,  Takes  this  method  of  ac- 
quainting the  public,  that  she  has  taken  a  convenient  house, 
near  Nassau-College,  in  Prince-Town,  and  proposes 
boarding  young  gentlemen  scholars  at  twenty  pounds  per 
annum,  including  their  washing  and  mending.  She  also 
proposes  to  lodge  gentlemen  and  ladies,  travellers,  that 
choose  private  lodgings,  very  reasonably. — The  New  York 
Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1353,  December  8, 
1768. 

Oxford  Township,  New- Jersey,  December,  8,  1768 
THESE  are  to  certify,  that  Elizabeth  Shoots,  my  Wife, 
has  extravagantly  run  me  in  debt,  so  that  from  the  day  of 
the  date  hereof,  I  do  discharge  any  person  or  persons  to 
credit  her  any  thing  upon  my  account,  for  I  will  not  dis- 
charge any  debt  of  her  contracting,  as  witness  my  hand, 

CHRISTOPHER  SHOOTS. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  335 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward 

STOLEN  out  of  the  subscriber's  stable  in  the  night  of 
the  22d  November  last,  in  York  town  by  a  certain  Richard 
Parker,  born  in  England,  a  mouse  coloured  HORSE,  very 
dark,  ....  the  said  Parker  took  with  him  a  brown 
coat  and  jacket,  ....  is  about  24  years  of  age,  about 
5  feet  9  or  10  inches  high,  and  is  remarkably  knock  kneed; 
he  has  a  half  brother  in  this  country  named  John  Collins, 
who  drove  coach  for  William  Allen,  Esq;  in  Philadelphia, 
these  few  years  past,  but  was  discharged  last  summer,  and 
I  understand  drives  now  for  some  gentleman  in  New- 
York,  where  it  is  most  likely  the  said  Parker  will  go,  being 
a  little  acquainted  in  the  Jersey,  as  he  lived  with  one  Hew- 
ling,  near  Burlington;  he  has  a  large  scar  in  his  forehead, 

very  near  his  hair Whoever  apprehends  the 

said  Parker,  and  secures  him,  with  the  above  articles,  shall 
have  the  above  reward,  and  THREE  POUNDS  for  himself 
alone,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

THOMAS  CULLEN 

SIR  To  the  CENTINEL 

I  CONGRATULATE  you,  on  your  escape  from  the  bloody 
knife  of  the  Anatomist,  who,  after  paying  his  visit  to  the 
patriotic  Episcopalians  of  Boston,  and  dissecting  a  Watch- 
Tower  in  New- York,  intended  to  have  seized  you  in  your 
sleep,  cut  you  up  alive  as  you  were,  and  exposed  you  as  a 
scarecrow,  to  frighten  his  opposers  into  a  tame  submission 

to  his  darling  Episcopate Most  unfavourable 

are  the  times  for  such  controversies It  is  to  be 

hoped,  however,  as  the  Anatomist  "scorns  to  fall  to  slash- 
ing, without  calling  one  to  stand  on  one's  guard/'  that  he 
will  desist  from  his  purpose,  and  endeavour  to  heal  the 
wound  he  may  have  made,  provided  it  can  be  made  appear, 
that  Dr.  Chandler  "was  the  aggressor"  in  this  dispute 


336  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

about  Bishops  ....  that  "Dr.  Chandler  had  a  general  com- 
mission from  his  own  brethren,"  the  Clergy  of  New- York 

and  New-Jersey 

I  am  next  to  shew  that  Dr.  Chandler  had  a  general  com- 
mission from  his  brethren,  the  Clergy  of  New  York  and 

New-Jersey First  then,  that  Dr.  Chandler  had 

a  general  commission  from  his  brethren,  appears  from  his 
own  words  in  his  advertisement  to  the  reader,  where  he 
tells  us,  as  an  apology  for  the  Appeal  "that  he  was  request- 
ed by  many  of  his  ''brethren  to  undertake  it  ...  that  the 
"task  was  first  imposed  upon  him  by  the  very  worthy  and 
"reverend  Dr.  Johnson  of  Stratford  in  Connecticut;"  and 
adds,  that  "at  the  time  when  this  treaty,"  as  "he  pompously 
calls  it,"  was  nearly  concluded,  the  Clergy  of  New-York 
and  New- Jersey,  "assisted  by  some  of  their  brethren  from 
"the  neighbouring  provinces  took  into  consideration,"  &c. 
"And  after  a  thorough  discussion  of  the  point,  they  were 
"unanimously  of  opinion,  that  fairly  to  explain  the  plan, 
"&c.  was  a  matter  of  necessity  and  duty.  It  was  accord- 
"ingly  voted  (says  he)  that  something  to  this  purpose 
"should  be  published,  and  the  Author  was  appointed  to 
this  service."  Here  we  have  an  express  appointment  from 
the  convention;  and  it  appears  they  were  urgent,  and  al- 
most laid  their  commands  on  him;  "excuses  (says  the 
Doctor)  were  not  admitted,  and  a  refusal  could  not  be. 
justified."  So  far  was  the  Doctor  from  acting  in  discon- 
nection with  the  Convention,  that  he  tells  us  "he  was  care- 
"ful  to  follow  the  directions  he  had  received  and  to  con- 
"sult  the  most  judicious  of  his  friends,  in  regard  to  the 
"method  and  management  of  the  work."  Hence  it  ap- 
pears, that  the  Doctor  had  not  only  a  commission  for,  but 
direction  in  his  publication,  and  that  the  Appeal  is  the 
product  of  the  united  efforts  of  the  Right  Reverendly- 
inclined  Clergy  of  the  provinces  of  York  and  Jersey,  in 


1768]  •*      NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  337 

full  Convention  met. — The  Pennnsylvania  Gazette,  No. 
2085,  December  8,  1768. 

The  SUBSCRIBERS,  assignees  of  the  estate  of  William 
Brown,  late  of  Woolwich,  in  the  county  of  Gloucester,  in 
New-Jersey  (for  the  use  of  his  creditors)  give  this  public 
notice,  that,  in  order  to  compleat  a  settlement  of  his  af- 
fairs, they  will  expose  to  sale  by  public  vendue,  on  the  2d 
day  of  January  next,  at  the  house  of  William  Cooper,  at 
the  Ferry,  opposite  Philadelphia,  at  2  o'clock  in  the  after- 
noon, 

A  VALUABLE  TRACT  of  LAND  and  SWAMP,  containing 
1000  acres,  or  thereabouts,  situate  in  Broadkill  Hundred, 
in  the  county  of  Sussex,  on  Delaware,  adjoining  the  land 
of  Benjamin  Mifflin,  where  he  now  lives,  and  within  four 
miles  of  a  good  landing  on  Broadkill  river,  which  empties 
into  Delaware-Bay.  The  upland  is  esteemed  good  strong 
land;  near  one  half  of  the  tract  is  swamp,  on  which  is  a 
great  quantity  of  timber,  and  may  be  easily  drained,  so 
as  to  make  excellent  meadow  or  hemp-ground,  and  so  di- 
vided with  the  upland  as  to  be  capable  of  making  four 
plantations,  of  equal  value.  The  whole  will  be  sold  to- 
gether, or  in  lots  of  250  acres  each,  as  may  best  suit  the 
purchaser.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  view 
the  premises,  by  applying  to  said  Benjamin  Mifflin.  The 
conditions  of  the  sale  will  be  made  known  at  the  place 
aforesaid,  by  SAMUEL  BILES,  JOHN  HINCHMAN,  and 
SAMUEL  BLACKWOOD. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  PLANTATION  lying  on  Shrewsbury  road,  4  miles  from 
Allentown,  in  the  township  of  Upper  Freehold,  in  the 
county  of  Monmouth,  and  province  of  East- Jersey,  con- 
taining 286  acres  of  LAND,  40  acres  of  good  English 
meadow,  and  as  much  more  may  be  made,  with  little  im- 

22 


338  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

provement,  the  upland  very  good  for  wheat  or  other  grain, 
the  whole  well  watered  and  timbered.  There  are  on  the 
premises,  a  two  story  house,  barn,  waggon-house,  smoak- 
house  and  two  good  bearing  orchards,  that  never  miss 
bearing  plenty  of  fruit  every  year:  The  house  stands 
exceeding  pleasant,  and  has  a  prospect  of  the  meadows 
from  the  door;  there  is  a  good  mill  within  one  mile  of 
the  premises,  and  three  others  the  farthest  not  exceeding 
four  miles;  also  nine  miles  to  a  landing:  There  is  a 
Quaker  Meeting-House  about  two  miles  distance,  a  Bap- 
tist Meeting-House  about  two  miles  distance,  and  a  Church 
and  Presbyterian  Meeting-House  not  exceeding  four 
miles;1  the  property  of  John  Clarke,  late  of  Stony-Brook, 
deceased.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  apply 
to  the  subscriber,  living  on  the  premises,  where  the  condi- 
tions of  sale  may  be  known,  from 

WILLIAM  CLARKE 

Penn's  Neck,  Salem  County,  Dec.  6,  1768. 
WHEREAS  Modlin,  the  wife  of  Joseph  Jiddery,  of  Lower 
Penn's  Neck,  hath  behaved  herself  very  disorderly  against 
him,  which  makes  him  apprehensive  that  she  will  run  him 
in  debt  to  his  hurt;  this  is  therefore  to  give  notice  to  ail 
persons  not  to  trust  her  on  my  account,  as  I  am  fully  de- 
termined not  to  pay  any  debt  of  her  contracting  after  this 

date. 

JOSEPH  JIDDERY. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2086,  December 
15,  1768. 

WHEREAS  my  Wife  Mary  Elizabeth,  has  without  any 
just  Cause,  eloped  from  my  Bed  and  Board :  These  are 
therefore  to  forewarn  all  Persons,  that  I  will  pay  no  Debt 

i  The  Quaker  Meeting  House  was  probably  at  Freehold;  the  Baptist 
Meeting  House  at  Middletown;  the  Church  (of  England)  and  the  Pres- 
byterian Meeting  House  at  Allentown. 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  339 

of  her  contracting  since  her  Elopement,  therefore,  that 
no  Person  harbour,  entertain  or  trust  her  on  my  Account. 

ANDRIES  KUNTER. 
Hackinsack,  9th  December,  1768. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1354,  December  15,  1768. 

WAS  taken  up  adrift,  last  week,  opposite  Marcus  Hook, 
a  cedar  SKIFF,  with  mulberry  timbers,  not  painted,  with  a 
turpentine  bottom.  Whoever  has  lost  the  same,  may  have 
her  again,  by  applying  to  Samuel  Hewes  in  New-Jersey, 
opposite  Marcus  Hook,  proving  their  property  and  pay- 
ing charges. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1358,  De- 
cember 15,  1768. 

New-York,  December  19.  The  Qth  Instant,  the  Sloop 
Bowler,  Captain  Hylton  arrived  here  from  Virginia;  on 
the  25th  of  November,  passing  Great  Egg  Harbour,  he 
saw  a  Ship  ashore,  but  was  unable  to  give  her  any  As- 
sistance, she  fired  half  Minute  Guns,  and  'tis  supposed  was 
bound  from  Boston  for  Philadelphia. 

THE  PUBLICK  are  desired  to  take  Notice,  That  the 
Stage  from  the  NEW-BRIDGE,  for  Powles-Hook,  will  ride 
but  once  a  Week,  after  the  Holy  Days,  till  the  Severity 
of  the  Season  is  over.  Attendance  will  be  given  every 
Tuesday,  at  the  usual  Hours,  by  the  Publick's  much 
obliged,  and 

Very  humble  Servant, 

ANDREW  VAN  BUSKIRK 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
894,  December  19,  1768. 

New-York,  December  19.  We  hear  from  Newark,  that 
last  Week  came  on  a  Trial  there  in  the  Circuit  Court,  be- 


34°  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

tween  James  Arnet,  Plaintiff,  and  one  Graham?-  late  Quar- 
ter-Master in  the  i6th  Regiment,  Defendant.  The  Charge 
was  for  firing  a  Gun  wilfully  into  a  Barn  in  Elizabeth- 
Town,  some  Time  ago,  which  set  it  on  Fire,  and  burnt  it 
up,  together  with  two  valuable  Horses  that  were  in  it. 
The  Evidence  being  pretty  clear,  Verdict  was  given  for 
the  Plaintiff,  with  full  Costs  of  Suit.— The  New  York 
Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1355,  December  19, 
[768. 

JOSEPH  BURWELL,  Post-Rider, 

Takes  this  method  to  inform  the  Public,  that  he  has 
engaged  to  ride  from  the  Union  Iron-works,  in  New-Jer- 
sey to  Philadelphia,  for  one  year,  commencing  the  first 
day  of  December,  1768;  that  during  the  three  Winter 
months,  viz.  December,  January  and  February,  he  per- 
forms the  said  stage  once  in  two  weeks,  and  the  other  nine 
months,  he  purposes  to  ride  weekly.  He  sets  out  from  his 
house,  in  Quaker  Town,  on  Wednesday,  arrives  at  the 
Indian  King,  in  Market-street,  Philadelphia,  on  Thursday 
morning,  and  sets  out  again  in  the  afternoon,  on  his  return 
back.  Such  Persons  that  have  any  Business  to  transact, 
that  he  can  serve  them  in,  are  desired  to  be  ready  at  the 
times  appointed,  when  he  will  receive  their  commands, 
and  execute  the  same,  with  the  greatest  Care  and  Fidelity, 
with  grateful  Acknowledgments  to  those,  who  are  pleased 
to  employ  him. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2087, 
December  22,  1768. 

• 
To  be  Let,  for  the  term  of  five  years,  and  entered  in  the 

last  of  March  next, 

A  VALUABLE  plantation,  situate  within  three  miles  of 
the  town  of  Salem,  in  Manington  township,  Salem  county, 

i  Peter  Graham  was  commissioned  Quartermaster  of  the  16th  British 
Regiment,  July  10,  1767.  The  regiment  was  in  duty  in  America,  1768- 
17V3. 


1/68]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  34 1 

West-New-Jersey,  containing  600  acres,  240  whereof  are 
new  banked  meadow  ground,  lying  on  Manington  and 
Salem  creek,  of  which  between  20  and  30  acres  will  be  fit 
for  grass  seed  this  spring;  about. 60  acres  are  old  drain'd 
meadow,  and  somewhat  above  100 acres  of  cleared  upland: 
the  rest  is  well  timbered,  the  upland  is  strong,  and  will  bear 
good  wheat  or  any  other  sort  of  grain ;  the  meadow  ground 
would  suit  for  hemp  as  well  as  grass;  the  new  bank  is  in 
very  good  order;  there  is  on  the  premises  a  good  frame 
house,  with  two  rooms  on  a  floor,  and  a  large  log  kitchen, 
a  barn  30  feet  by  50,  with  stalls  for  feeding  16  oxen,  which 
is  intended  to  be  built  mid  finished  by  next  harvest;  the 
place  is  well  suited  for  a  large  dairy,  or  for  feeding  cattle, 
and  an  excellent  range  for  hogs.  Any  person  inclining 
to  rent  the  premises,  may  be  informed  of  the  conditions, 
by  applying  to  the  subscriber,  in  Philadelphia. 

RICHARD  WHISTER. 

N.  B.  Salem  is  the  county  town  and  public  landing, 
from  whence  any  produce  may  be  sent  to  Philadelphia 
market,  for  a  trifling  expence. — The  Pennsylvania  Chron- 
icle, No.  103,  December  26- January  2,  1769. 


The  Public  are  desired  to  suspend  their  Judgment 
of  a  Paragraph  of  News  inserted  in  Mr.  Parker's  last  Pa- 
per, with  Regard  to  the  burning  of  a  Barn  at  Elizabeth- 
Town,  in  April  1767,  until  the  Matter  is  fairly  related, 
which  shall  be  done  in  this  Paper  next  week.     P.  G. 
— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
895,  December  26,  1768. 

Princeton,  December  6,  1768. 

Six  DOLLARS  REWARD, 

FOR  apprehending  and  delivering  to  the  Subscriber,  or 
to  his  Deputy  at  Mill-Stone,  a  certain  Thomas  Stiles,  who 
being  under  Sentence  of  Death,  broke  and  made  his  es- 


342  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [l?68 

cape  from  the  common  Goal  at  Mill-Stone  in  the  County 
of  Somerset  and  Province  of  New-Jersey.  He  is  a  well 
set  young  Fellow,  of  about  20  Years  of  Age,  about  five 
Feet  six  Inches  high,  has  black  Hair,  and  is  of  a  swarthy 
Complection.  His  dress  cannot  be  particularly  described. 
It  is  hoped  that  every  one,  not  merely  for  the  Reward,  but 
that  public  Justice  may  be  had  on  the  Criminal,  will  use 
their  Endeavours  to  have  him  apprehended. 

ROBERT  STOCKTON,  Sheriff. 

— The  Nezu  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1356,  December  26,  1768. 

New- Jersey,  December  20,  1768. 
THREE  POUNDS  Reward 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber  on  Saturday  Night  last, 
a  certain  Daniel  Stone,  who  has  been  from  Ireland  about 
two  Years ;  has  much  of  the  Brogue  in  his  Talk,  is  near  20 
Years  old,  and  about  five  Feet  ten  Inches  high,  with  a  fair 
Complexion,  and  black  Hair :  He  took  with  him  a  little 
brown  Horse  between  13  and  14  Hands  high,  with  a  Sad- 
dle and  Bridle.  The  said  Daniel  Stone,  had  on  when  he 
absconded,  a  Thickset  Fustian  Coat  and  Waistcoat,  a  Sil- 
ver-laced Hat,  an  old  brown  Bath  Rug  Great  Coat,  a  Pair 
of  Buckskin  Breeches,  and  a  Pair  of  brown  Homespun 
Stockings.  Whoever  will  apprehend  the  said  Runaway, 
or  give  Notice  where  the  Horse  may  be  found,  shall  be 
entitled  to  the  above  Reward  to  be  paid  by  me. 

JOHN  CAREY 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1356,  December  29,  1768. 

Woodbridge,  December  19,  1768. 
NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  Nathaniel  Heard  hath 
taken  up  a  straggling  person,  a  man  of  about  30  or  35 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  343 

years  of  age.  He  would  give  no  satisfactory  account  of 
himself  when  under  examination  and  was  committed  to 
goal  in  Perth-Amboy,  by  order  of  Stephen  Skinner,  Esq; 
he  is  about  5  feet  10  inches  high,  has  dark  brown  hair,  of  a 
swarthy  complexion,  and  has  a  stoop  in  his  shoulders ;  he 
is  very  still  in  company,  appears  to  be  a  subtle  fellow, 
writes  a  good  hand,  and  has  one  ancle  much  bigger  than 
the  other;  his  wearing  apparel  but  poor.  Now  if  it  ap- 
pears by  this  description,  that  he  is  any  gentleman's  ser- 
vant, or  that  any  one  hath  any  demand  on  him,  they  are 
desired  to  make  it  known  to  the  subscriber,  or  to  the  Jail- 
keeper  in  Perth-Amboy,  within  4  or  5  weeks,  or  he  will 
be  sold  to  pay  cost. 

NATHANIEL  HEARD/ 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2088,  December  29, 
1768. 

Mr.  GAINE, 

A  Gentleman  who  assisted  as  Counsel  for  Mr.  Graham, 
in  the  Suit  brought  against  him  by  James  Arnet,  for 
the  burning  of  his  Barn,  which  was  lately  tried  at 
Newark,  as  is  mentioned  in  Mr.  Parker's  last  Paper, 
in  Justice  to  Mr.  Graham's  Character,  furnishes  you 
with  the  following  Account  of  Trial;  which  it  is  not 
doubted  you  will  convey  to  the  Public  thro'  the  Chan- 
nel of  your  Paper,  for  the  Justification  of  his  Char- 
acter. The  Representation  published  by  him  is  in 
Substance,  that  the  Charge  against  Mr.  Graham,  was 
for  wilfully  burning  the  Plaintiff's  Barn;  that  the 
Evidence  was  clear,  and  the  Jury  found  a  Verdict 
for  the  Plaintiff. 

THE  true  State  of  the  Case  is  as  follows,  to  wit.  The 
Plaintiff's  Declaration  contained  a  double  Charge :  First, 

iFor  sketch  of  Nathaniel  Heard,   see  N.  J.  Archives,   Second  Series, 
I.,  9. 


344  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

That  the  Defendant  negligently  discharged  his  Fusee  so 
near  the  Plaintiff's  Barn,  that  by  Reason  thereof  the  Barn 
was  set  on  Fire  and  consumed.  Secondly,  That  the  De- 
fendant maliciously  intending  to  deprive  the  Plaintiff  of 
his  Barn,  set  it  on  Fire,  by  which  it  was  consumed.  With 
Respect  to  the  last  Charge,  there  was  not  the  least  Evi- 
dence offered  to  support  it;  and  it  was  universally  agreed 
that  the  Barn  was  fired  by  Accident.  With  Respect  to  the 
first  Charge,  the  Evidence  was  far  from  being  clear.  Mr. 
Graham,  and  three  other  Officers,  were  going  to  divert 
themselves  with  their  Fusees;  in  passing  near  the  Barn, 
one  of  them  discharged  his  Fusee  at  a  Bird,  and  it  is  sup- 
posed that  the  Wadding  fell  on  some  scattered  Hay  near 
the  Barn,  by  which  the  Fire  was  conveyed  to  the  Barn. 
This  was  indeed  mere  Conjecture  founded  on  this  Fact, 
That  a  Person  at  a  Distance,  and  who  did  not  hear  the 
Discharge  of  the  Fusee,  saw  the  Hay  burning,  and  the 
Fire  extending  itself  towards  the  Barn,  and  a  few  Minutes 
after  the  Barn  was  in  Flames.  Mr.  Shilleto,  one  of  the 
Officers,  confessed  he  had  discharged  the  Fusee ;  but  hav- 
ing immediately  after  the  Accident  left  the  Country  to 
avoid  a  Prosecution,  Mr.  Graham  lost  the  Benefit  of  his 
Testimony.  The  other  two  Officers  who  were  with  Messrs 
Graham  and  Shilleto,  and  therefore  best  able  to  determine 
who  it  was  that  discharged  the  Fusee,  fixed  it  by  their 
Evidence  fully  and  positively  on  Mr.  Shilleto,  and  deposed 
that  there  was  but  one  Fusee  discharged  in  the  Company, 
from  the  Time  they  left  the  Place  where  they  had  dined, 
till  the  Barn  was  discovered  to  be  in  Flames;  but  their 
Testimony  was  opposed  by  that  of  two  other  Witnesses, 
who,  at  a  Distance  saw  one  of  the  Company  of  Officers 
discharge  his  Fusee  near  the  Barn.  One  of  these  Wit- 
nesses declared,  That  immediately  after  the  Discharge,  he 
knew  the  officer  to  be  Mr.  Graham,  and  the  other  declared, 


1768]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  345 

That  the  Person  who  discharged  the  Fusee,  was  the  first 
who  entered  into  Mr.  Woodruff's  Store,  and  who  was 
proved  by  other  Witnesses  to  have  been  Mr.  Graham ;  but 
it  was  also  proved,  That  one  of  those  two  Witnesses,  had 
before  charged  the  Fact  on  Mr.  Shilleto,  and  that  the  other 
had  given  a  different  Account  from  that  which  he  rendered 
on  his  Oath.  The  two  Officers  who  were  Witnesses  for 
Mr.  Graham,  had,  it  seems,  on  an  Arbitration,  shewn  the 
Spot  in  which  Mr.  Shilleto  discharged  the  Fusee,  and  one 
of  the  Arbitrators  was  produced  to  prove  it;  and  he  de- 
clared, That  it  appeared  to  him  impossible  that  a  Discharge 
of  a  Fusee  at  that  Place,  could  have  fired  the  Barn.  A 
discharged  Soldier  also  swore,  That  he  saw  the  four  Offi- 
cers with  Fusees;  that  one  of  them  fired,  which  drew  his 
Attention,  and  at  that  Instant,  Mr.  Shilleto  was  some 
Yards  behind  the  others,  and  asked  them  who  had  fired; 
but  the  Distance,  at  which  this  Soldier  declared  this  Tran- 
saction happened  from  the  Barn,  did  not  agree  with  the 
Account  given  by  the  Plaintiff's  Witnesses.  This  is  in 
Substance  the  Evidence  that  was  offered  on  the  Trial, 
which  must  appear  far  from  clear.  The  Witnesses  seemed 
at  first  View  to  be  opposed  to  each  other,  and  the  Jury 
tho't  it  their  Duty  to  reconcile  the,ir  Testimony,  if  possible, 
which  they  did  by  supposing  that  two  Fusees  were  dis- 
charged at  different  Distances  from  the  Barn;  the  one  at 
the  Spot  shewn  to  the  Arbitrators,  they  supposed  to  have 
been  discharged  by  Mr.  Shilleto;  the  other,  near  the  Barn, 
by  Mr.  Graham.  This  Supposition  could  not  however  be 
reconciled  with  the  Testimony  of  the  two  Officers,  unless 
it  should  be  thought  that  two  Fusees  had  been  discharged 
in  their  Company,  and  that  they  had  forgot  the  Discharge 
of  one  of  them.  It  was  upon  this  Principle  however  that 
the  Jury,  after  four  Hours  Recess  from  the  Bar,  found  a 
Verdict  for  the  Plaintiff. 

P.  G. 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

ALL  Persons  having  any  Demands  upon  the  Estate  of 
Moses  Ogden,  late  of  Elizabeth-Town,  deceased,  are  de- 
sired to  bring  in  their  Accounts,  that  the  same  may  be  ad- 
justed; also  those  who  are  any  wise  indebted  to  the  said 
Estate,  are  desired  speedily  to  discharge  their  Obligations, 
to  prevent  further  Trouble. 

MARY  OGDEN,  Executrix,  i 

ROBERT  OGDEN  V  Executors. 

JOHN  COUSENS  OGDEN      ) 

MARY  OGDEN, 

(Widow  of  the  said  Moses  Ogden,) 
ACQUAINTS  the  Public,  that  the  Business  of  Shoe-mak- 
ing is  carried  on  as  usual;  and  that  Orders  for  any  Article 
in  that  Way,  shall  be  complied  with  in  the  best  and  most 
expeditious  Manner. — The  New  York  Gazette  and  Week- 
ly Mercury,  No.  896,  January  2,  1769. 

Perth- Awiboy,  December  28,  1768. 
BY  Order  of  Stephen  Skinner  and  Jonathan  Frazce, 
Esqrs.  Judges  of  the  Inferior  Court  of  Common  Pleas  for 
the  County  of  Middlesex,  in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey: 
Notice  is  hereby  given,  ,to  the  Creditor  or  Creditors  re- 
spectively of  Robert  Lee,  an  Insolvent  Debtor,  in  the  Goal 
of  the  said  County,  to  shew  Cause,  if  any  they  have,  be- 
fore the  said  Judges,  at  the  House  of  Elijah  Dunham,  Inn- 
holder,  in  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy,  on  Monday  the 
Twenty  third  Day  of  January  next,  why  an  Assignment 
of  the  said  Debtor's  Estate,  respectively,  should  not  be 
made,  and  the  said  Robert  Lee  discharged,  pursuant  to  the 
Directions  of  an  Act  of  the  Governor,  Council  and  Gen- 
eral Assembly,  intitled,  "An  Act  for  the  Relief  of  Insol- 
vent Debtors." 

WERE  found  on  Long-Island,  between  New-York  Ferry 


1769]  NEWSPAPER  EXTRACTS.  347 

and  the  Narrows,  a  re<}  Morocco  pocket  book,  and  a  silk 
handkerchief :  The  pocket  book  was  inclosed  in  a  black 
silk  case,  and  contained  a  £.  3  Jersey  Bill,  some  needle- 
work, and  several  papers,  among  which  is  a  Ticket  for  a 
ball.  They  are  supposed  to  have  been  dropt  by  a  lady. 

As  the  person  who  found  them,  was  on  a  journey,  and 
was  not  acquainted  with  a  fit  person  to  leave  them  with, 
nearer  to  New-York,  the  owner  is  desired  to  apply  for 
them  to  the  subscriber  in  Princetown. 

December  30,  1768. 

JONATHAN  D.  SERJEANT. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1357,  January  2,  1769. 

Magazines  being  the  taste  of  the  age,  and  found  to  pos- 
sess many  conveniences,  such  as  gratifying  the  curiosity 
of  the  public,  and  serving  as  a  repository  for  many  small, 
tho'  valuable,  pieces  that  would  otherwise  be  lost  to  the 
world,  LEWIS  NICOLA  proposes  publishing  such  a  work 
monthly,  under  the  title  of 

THE  AMERICAN  MAGAZINE. 

There  will  be  annually  13  numbers  (containing  three 
sheets  each  in  8vo)  viz.  One  for  every  month,  and  an 
appendix  consisting  of  a  general  title  page,  index,  &c. 

The  price  to  each  subscriber  will  be  Thirteen  Shillings 
Pennsylvania  currency,  to  be  paid  at  the  time  of  subscrib- 
ing. 

Such  persons  as  choose  to  favour  the  public  with  essays, 
pieces  of  poetry,  &c.  are  desired  to  forward  them  to  the 
editor  Lewis  Nicola,  or  to  Messrs.  Hall  and  Sellers,  Will- 
iam and  Thomas  Bradford,  or  Mr.  William  Goddard, 
Printers,  in  Philadelphia 

Subscriptions  will  be  taken,  and  papers  to  be  inserted  in 


348  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

the  Magazine  received  by  the  following  persons.  Mr. 
Hunt,  Trenton;  Mr.  Charles  Petit,  Burlington;  Mr. 
John  Henry,  and  Mr.  Jonathan  Baldwin,  Princeton; 

Elias  Boudinot,  Esq;  Elizabeth-Town — The 

Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  104,  January  2-9,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD 

-N          A   Very    good    House    with    eight 
VIEW  OF          Acres  of  good  Pasture  Land  adjoin- 
FARM  AND         ing,  situate  about  one  Mile  from  New- 
y  ark  Church,  on  the  main  Road  to  Sec- 

ond River.    The  House  is  almost  new, 
HOUSES.    J     4^  Feet  bv  ^2j  fronts  the  Road,  has  4 

good  Rooms  on  a  Floor,  with  a  Fire-Place  in  each,  an 
Entry  through  nine  Feet  wide,  a  good  Cellar  under  the 
Whole,  which  has  one  Fire-Place  for  a  Kitchen,  the  Door 
of  which  opens  in  the  Rear  even  with  the  Ground :  On 
the  whole  it  is  very  convenient  for  a  Gentleman's  Country 
Seat  or  Store,  as  a  great  Part  of  the  Trade  of  Ne.wark 
passes  by  the  Door,  and  the  Lot  joins  the  River,  gives  a 
fine  Prospect  of  the  River  both  above  and  below  Newark, 
as  well  as  of  Capt.  Kennedy's  Mansion-House,  and  Plan- 
tation on  Barbadoes  Neck.  On  the  Land  there  is  a  good 
Chaise  House  and  Barn,  about  80  young  Apple  Trees,  be- 
sides other  Fruit  Trees  and  Garden.  Also  a  Pot-Ash 
Works  with  three  Boilers  and  one  Copper,  and  as  com- 
plete an  oven  for  refining  as  any  in  America,  will  be  sold 
either  with  or  without  the  other,  on  reasonable  Terms. 
Apply  to  ISAAC  MYER,  on  the  Premises,  or  THOMAS 
GRANT,  at  New- York. 

N.  B.  If  more  Land  should  be  wanted,  it  may  be  had 
on  reasonable  Terms  in  the  Neighbourhood. — The  New 
York.  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1357,  January 
5,  1769- 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  349 

Gloucester  County,  December  31,  1768. 
WAS  committed  to  the  Goal  of  this  County  on  the  I5th 
Instant,  a  certain  Man,  on  Suspicion  of  being  a  Runaway; 
he  calls  himself  William  Gould,  says  he  understands  the 
Business  of  making  Pot-ash,  Pearl-ash  and  Boston  Crown 
Soap,  and  that  he  lately  lived  at  Benjamin  Kendall's  Pot- 
ash Works.  These  are  to  inform  his  Master,  if  any  he 
has,  that  if  he  does  not  come  in  two  Weeks  from  this 
Date,  pay  Charges,  and  take  him  away,  he  will  be  sold  for 

the  same,  by 

JOSIAH  CHATTIN,  Goaler. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2089,  January  5, 
1769. 

Bordentown,  January  2,  1768  [  ?] 

To  be  sold  by  public  vendue,  on  Monday,  the  5th  day 
of  March  next,  on  the  premises,  for  the  benefit  of  the  cred- 
itors of  William  Imlay, 

ALL  his  real  estate,  consisting  of  sundry  houses  and  lots 
in  Bordentown,  Burlington  county,  West-Jersey. 

One  lot  of  ground  containing  one  acre;  on  which  is 
built  a  large  two  story  brick  house  and  kitchen;  a  large 
pork  house,  smoke  house,  fat  house,  cooper's  shop,  barn, 
stable,  chair  and  hay  house;  the  dwelling  house  is  situate 
in  a  very  good  part  of  the  town  for  a  store,  in  which  that 
business  has  been  carried  on  for  these  18  years  past  with 
considerable  success;  the  whole  being  well  calculated  and 
very  convenient  for  a  store,  and  barreling  pork. 

Also  one  other  valuable  lot  of  ground,  containing  two 
acres;  on  which  is  a  two  story  brick  house  and  kitchen; 
also  a  young  orchard  of  choice  grafted  fruit. 

Likewise  one  other  lot  of  ground,  containing  one  fifth 
of  an  acre;  on  which  is  a  frame  house. 

Also  two  other  lots  of  ground,  containing  one  fifth  of 
an  acre  each. 


350  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

The  vendue  to  begin  at  ten  o'clock,  at  which  time  the 
conditions  of  sale  will  be  made  known. 
JOHN  IMLAY 


HENRY  DRINKER 


Assignees 


CLEMENT  BIDDLE 
— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  105,  January  9- 
16,  1769. 

New-York,  January  9.  On  Wednesday  December 
28th,  1768,  at  his  Seat  in  Morris  County,  departed  this 
Life,  Captain  ROBERT  TROUP,  ^Etat  60.  With  all  the 
Fortitude  of  the  Hero,  he  joined  the  Meekness,  Benevo- 
lence and  Compassion  of  the  Christian.  Warmed  with 
true  British  Ardour  in  the  late  Wars,  he  signaliz'd  him- 
self in  the  Cause  of  his  Country,  and  atchieved  Victories 
worthy  the  Cognizance  of  Fame.  A  tender  and  loving 
Husband,  a  kind  Parent,  a  sincere  Friend,  and  an  Ex- 
ample of  steady  Veracity  and  diffusive  Charity :  He  fin- 
ished his  Course  lamented  by  all  around  him. 

His  humble  Stone,  what  few  vain  Marbles  can, 
May  justly  say,  Here  lies  an  honest  Man.     POPE. 

THE  FERRY  from  Powles-Hook,  to  Mesier's  Dock,  at 
New- York,  together  with  the  House,  Stables,  and  some 
Pasture  Land,  is  to  be  sold  at  public  Vendue,  on  Monday 
the  23d  Inst.  for  the  Term  of  four  Years,  from  May  next. 
Conditions  to  be  seen  on  the  Day  of  Sale,  at  the  Ferry 
House,  at  Powles-Hook. — The  New  York  Gazette  and 
Weekly  Mercury,  No.  897,  January  9,  1769. 

January  g,  1769. 

TOOK  up  something  more  than  two  Months  since,  a 
small  Yawl,  or  Moses  Boat :  The  Owner  describing  her, 
and  paying  Charges,  may  have  her  again,  by  applying  to 
JOHN  HARTSHORNE,  at  Black-Point,  in  Shrewsbury. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  35  l 

New- York,  January  4,  1769. 

LOST  on  Monday  last,  about  5  o' Clock,  on  the  Road 
leading  from  Powles-Hook  to  Bergen-Point,  a  Pair  of 
Saddle  Bags,  mark'd  Willing  and  Todd,  on  the  Mouth, 
in  'which  was  contained  as  follows :  Sixty  Half  Johan- 
nes's, 125  Dollars  and  a  Doubloon,  Nine  Yards  Crimson 
Damask,  Three  ruffled  Shirts,  marked  W.  S.  one  Pair 
Stone  Knee  Buckles,  one  Stock  ditto,  in  a  Stock,  one  Pair 
of  Cotton  Sattinet  Breeches,  two  Pair  white  broad  ribb'd 
worsted  Stockings,  two  colour'd  Silk  Handkerchiefs,  and 
three  Pocket  Handkerchiefs.  Whoever  finds  the  above, 
and  will  bring  it  to  Michael  Cornelius,  at  Powles-Hook, 
or  to  the  Printing-Office  in  Beaver-street,  shall  receive 
TWENTY  POUNDS  Reward,  and  all  reasonable  Charges 
paid. — The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1358,  January  9,  1769. 


A  VIEW 


OF 


FARM. 


To  BE  SOLD 

A  Tract  of  land  lying  in  Freehold, 
in  the  county  of  Monmouth,  East 
New- Jersey;  containing  about  six 
hundred  acres,  on  which  is  a  good 
house,  barn,  three  orchards,  and  up- 
wards of  three  hundred  acres  of  cleared 


upland  and  meadow.  The  said  tract 
is  so  situated,  that  it  will  answer  to  make  three  farms  or 
settlements;  so  that  there  may  be  a  sufficient  quantity  of 
clear  upland  and  meadow,  and  plenty  of  good  timber  to 
each  part;  The  whole  would  suit  any  gentleman  or  far- 
mer, the  most  part  good  land,  lying  in  a  good  neighbour- 
hood, a  healthy  pleasant  place,  and  as  beautiful  a  prospect, 
as  perhaps  any  in  the  province.  Any  person  who  inclines 
to  purchase,  may  have  the  whole,  or  either  of  the  parts, 
by  applying  to  the  subscriber  who  lives  on  the  premises. 

JOHN  ANDERSON. 


352  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

ALSO  to  be  sold,  A  tract  of  land  lying  in  said  Freehold, 
belonging  to  Joseph  Newton,  jun.  containing  as  is  sup- 
posed, about  sixty  acres,  the  most  part  cleared,  having  on 
it  a  good  orchard,  house,  barn,  and  smith's  shop  (being 
a  suitable  place  for  a  blacksmith,  having  been  occupied  by 
blacksmiths  upwards  of  fifty  years.)  Also  near  two  hun- 
dred acres  of  wood  land  lying  about  a  mile  distant  from 
the  same.  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase,  may  apply 
to  the  subscriber  for  further  particulars. 

January  6,  1769.  JOHN  ANDERSON. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1358,  January  12,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Valuable  plantation,  situate  in  the  precinct  of  Piles- 
grove,  county  of  Salem,  and  province  of  West  New-Jer- 
sey, lying  on  the  great  road  that  leads  to  Gloucester,  con- 
taining about  250  acres  of  land,  a  quantity  of  good 
meadow,  and  more  may  easily  be  made;  the  upland  very 
good  for  wheat,  or  other  grain;  the  whole  well  watered 
(with  a  good  spring  by  the  house)  and  well  timbered. 
There  are  on  the  premises  a  two  story  frame  house,  with 
two  rooms  on  a  floor,  a  brick  kitchen,  smoke  house,  and 
other  out-houses,  two  good  large  barns,  with  a  great  deal 
of  stable  room.  The  place  is  very  convenient  for  keeping 
shop  or  tavern ;  there  has  formerly  been  a  shop  kept  there, 
having  a  convenient  brick  building  for  the  same,  with 
good  stone  cellars  under  shop  and  house;  a  large  apple 
orchard  of  good  fruit.  The  house  stands  exceeding  pleas- 
ant, facing  the  great  road.  There  is  a  good  grist-mill, 
saw-mill,  and  fulling-mill,  joining  said  place,  within  6 
miles  of  a  landing,  and  5  miles  from  the  glass  house. 
There  are  Quaker,  Baptist  and  Presbyterian  m£eting- 
houses,  not  exceeding  3  miles  from  said  place;  late  the 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  353 

property  of  John  Richman,  Esq;  deceased.  Any  person 
inclining  to  purchase  said  place,  may  apply  to  the  sub- 
scriber, living  on  the  premises,  where  the  conditions  of 
sale  may  be  known.  ISAAC  RICH  MAN 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Tract  of  land,  containing  120  acres,  by  MATTHEW 
NIEUKIRK,  and  JACOB  RICHMAN,  executors  of  the  last 
will  and  testament  of  Abraham  Nieukirk,  deceased,  lying 
in  the  township  of  Pilesgrove,  in  the  county  of  Salem,  and 
province  of  West-Jersey;  the  one  half  cleared  land,  and 
some  meadow  ground  cleared,  the  remainder  wood-land; 
the  upland  all  good  wheat-land;  a  frame  house,  and  log 
kitchen,  on  said  premises,  and  a  log  barn;  a  young  thriv- 
ing apple  and  peach  orchard.  The  title  indisputable.  Any 
person  inclining  to  purchase  the  same,  on  paying  one  third 
of  the  money  down,  may  have  a  reasonable  time  to  pay 
the  remainder,  paying  interest,  and  giving  good  security, 
if  required,  unto  MATTHEW  NIEUKIRK  and  JACOB  RICH- 
MAN,  executors. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2090, 
January  12,  1769. 

Captain  Fairey  left  Halifax  the  5th  of  November,  and 
met  with  several  hard  gales  of  wind,  in  which  he  shipped 
some  very  heavy  seas,  and  received  considerable  damage 
in  his  sails  and  rigging.  On  the  29th  ult.  falling  in  with 
the  land  to  the  northward  of  our  Capes,  he  saw  a  sloop 
ashore. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1362,  January 
12,  1769. 

To  be  SOLD  by 
ISRAEL  PEMBERTON 

Several  plantations  near  Cohansey,  in  Cumberland 
county,  West  Jersey. 

23 


354  NEW   JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

Jan.  20,  1769. 

RAN  AWAY  last  night,  from  the  subscriber,  living  in  the 
city  of  Burlington,  the  two  following  described  servant 
men,  the  one  named  Christopher  Archibold,  about  twenty- 
one  years  of  age,  a  short  well  set  fellow,  about  five  feet 
four  inches  high,  pock-marked,  wears  his  own  hair,  which 
is  of  a  dark  brown : — Had  on,  when  he  went  away,  a  blan- 
ket coat,  white  swanskin  jacket,  with  sleeves,  and  a  red 
serge  under  it,  check  shirt,  lightest-coloured  plush  breech- 
es, a  small  beaver  hat,  about  half  worn — The  other  named 
John  Jones,  about  seventeen  years  of  age,  five  feet  four 
inches  high,  pock  marked,  thin  faced,  short  brown  hair, 
stoops  in  his  walk,  and  has  a  down  look : — Had  on,  when 
he  went  away,  a  short  grey  coat,  lined  with  red  baize,  an 
old  velvet  jacket,  of  a  snuff  colour,  buckskin  breeches,  and 
a  felt  hat.  Whoever  apprehends  and  secures  said  servants, 
so  that  their  master  may  have  them  again,  shall  receive  a 
reward  of  FORTY  SHILLINGS,  and  reasonable  charges,  or 
TWENTY  SHILLINGS  for  each,  paid  by 

JOSEPH  HAIGHT. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  106,  January  16- 
23,  1769. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given  to  Daniel  Cooper.  Junior,1  Sher- 
iff of  Morris  County,  in  New- Jersey  and  all  others  whom 
it  may  concern,  That  there,  is  a  Man  now  in  Goal  at  Jam- 
aica, in  Queen's  County,  in  the  Province  of  New- York, 
who  hath  confessed  himself  to  be  John  Smith,  who  some 
Time  past  broke  out  of  Morris  County  Goal;  for  appre- 

i  Daniel  Cooper,  junior,  was  born  January  14,  1729,  at  Piscataway, 
Middlesex  county,  son  of  Daniel  Cooper  (b.  May  1,  1695;  m.  six  times 
and  d.  May  2 ,1795,  having  just  rounded  out  a  century)  and  Grace 
Ti?r£L°^V  I\!S  ™  <  tt  w"as  doubtless  the  father  who  was  appointed 
i  i/fv,  ie  M°"2s  county  courts  in  1761,  and  again  in  1768.  The  son 
held  the  office  of  Sheriff  in  1761,  and  was  again  fppointed  in  1767.  He 
T?V  H™LTi — ^  Conov|rr:  2d>  Nancy  Cross,  dau.  of  the  Rev.  Mr.  Cross. 
He  lived  in  Passaic  Valley,  on  a  farm  of  500  acres,  derived  from  his 
father.  He  d.  May  — ,  1787.  Three  of  his  sons  went  to  Kentucky. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  355 

bending  of  whom  there  is  Ten  Dollars  offered,  in  the  New 
York  Gazette,  of  October  the  3ist  last  past. 

Per  SAMUEL  SMITH,  Esq; 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
899,  January  16,  1769. 

New-York,  January  16.  We  hear  from  Little  Egg- 
Harbour,  that  in  the  Time  of  the  late  Snow  Storm  a  little 
before  Christmas,  three  young  Swamp-men,  who  lived  in 
one  Cabin,  .two  of  them  Brothers;  named  Smith,  carried 
a  Bag  of  Corn  each  to  a  Mill,  about  8  Miles  from  their 
Residence,  and  while  their  Grists  were  grinding,  they 
went  to  a  Tavern  at  a  small  Distance  from  the  Mill,  where 
having  drank  pretty  freely,  they  returned  to  the  Mill,  in 
the  Evening  took  their  Baggs  on  their  Backs,  and  went 
off  with  Design  to  go  home :  The  next  Morning,  one  was 
found  dead  in  the  Snow,  and  his  Bag  nigh  him,  with  an 
Appearance  as  if  he  had  struggled  to  get  his  Bag  from  the 
Ground.  Some  Distance  another  was  found  in  the  Snow, 
with  some  Signs  of  Life;  he  was  taken  to  a  House,  and 
Means  used  for  his  Recovery,  but  to  no  Purpose :  The 
other  had  made  a  shift  to  get  to  an  old  Cabin,  and  had 
tried  to  make  a  up  a  Sort  of  a  Bed  with  Leaves,  but  the 
Cold  overcome  him,  so  that  he  was  froze  to  Death  also. — 
The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1359, 
January  16,  1769. 

RUN  away  the  2d  instant,  (January,  1769,)  from 
Evant  Van  Zile,  of  Second  River,  Bergen  County,  New- 
Jersey,  an  Irish  servant  lad,  named  Robert  Campbel, 
about  1 8  years  of  age,  and  5  feet  high,  slim  bodied,  fail- 
complexion,  pale  face,  one  of  his  feet  a  little  crooked,  oc- 
casioned by  a  bruise,  has  a  scal'd  head,  is  very  fluent  of 
speech,  has  much  of  the  Irish  accent,  and  can  speak  Eng- 
lish, Dutch,  and  High  Dutch :  He  had  on  among  other 


356  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

things,  a  dark  grey  bearskin  half  surtout  coat,  a  pair  of 
black  plush  breeches,  and  a  blue  and  white  worsted  cap. 

Whoever  brings  the  said  runaway  to  his  master,  will  be 
paid  two  dollars  reward,  if  taken  up  within,  or  three  dol- 
lars, if  taken  up  out  of  the  said  province,  besides  all  rea- 
sonable charges.  Supposed  to  be  gone  towards  Millstone. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  that  the  plantation  belonging 
to  George  Hicks,  absconded,  lying  opposite  to  Middletown 
Point,  in  East  New- Jersey,  will  be  exposed  to  sale  by  way 
of  public  vendue,  at  the  house  of  Jarrett  Wall,  at  Mount- 
pleasant,  on  Wednesday  the  first  day  of  March  next.  The 
said  plantation  contains  about  120  acres  of  land,  whereon 
is  a  dwelling-house,  barn,  a  very  good  bearing  orchard, 
some  very  good  salt  meadow,  and  not  much  of  the  land 
cleared.  The  vendue  to  begin  at  one  o'clock  said  day, 
where  the  conditions  of  sale  will  be  published.  January 
the  1 6th,  1769. 

JOHN  BURROWES         ) 

By  us  JARRETT  WALL,  and   >  Auditors. 

LEWIS  FORMAN  ) 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1359,  January  19,  1769. 

A  LIST  of  LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post-Office,  Phil- 
adelphia 

B.     Mrs.  Biggs,  Mountholly 

D.     Jonathan  Davis,  Salem  County. 

F     Mary  Fitch,  Mountholly 

J.     Richard  Jones,  near  Woodbury. 

M.     Samuel  Morgan,  Pilesgrove. 

T.  Capt.  Jacob  Thede,  John  Thompson,  Joshua  Tag- 
gart,  Pilesgrove. 

W.  Stephen  Wilson,  Cumberland  County. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  357 

To  Be  SOLD  or  LETT, 

By  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Philadelphia,  near  the 
Drawbridge, 

A  VALUABLE  PLANTATION  in  West  Jersey,  on  Salem- 
creek,  and  is  Part  on  Delaware  bay,  the  lowest  Part  of 
Penn's  Neck,  in  Salem  County,  and  commands  a  fine  Pros- 
pect of  the  Shipping  going  to  and  from  Sea;  it  is  very 
convenient  for  Philadelphia  Market,  as  Flats  and  Shallops 
are  almost  every  Day  going  by  the  Premises,  where  there 
is  an  exceeding  good  Landing,  and  Shallops  often  take  in 
their  Loading  there;  the  Distance  by  Land  from  Philadel- 
phia is  about  36  Miles,  and  about  50  by  Water;  there  is 
a  good  Seine  Fishery  for  Rock  and  Perch,  which  with  a 
little  Industry  may  be  made  worth  Thirty  Pounds  a  Sea- 
son, and  the  Creek  affords  great  Diversion  for  angling  the 
whole  Summer,  within  Sight  of  the  House.  The  whole 
Tract  contains  520  Acres  and  a  Half,  which  is  divided 
into  two  Plantations,  one  of  434  Acres  and  a  Half,  the 
other  86  Acres,  whereon  there  is  a  good  framed  House, 
consisting  of  two  Rooms,  with  a  Fire-place  in  each,  a 
Well  of  good  Water  at  the  Door,  and  a  young  thriving 
Orchard,  of  grafted  Fruit.  On  the  434  acres  there  is  a 
good  frame  house,  with  4  rooms  on  the  lower  floor,  and 
good  cellars  under  the  whole;  a  good  kitchen  and  lodging 
rooms  over  it;  and  at  a  small  distance  there  is  a  neat  good 
dairy  house,  a  well  of  exceeding  good  water,  a  large  barn 
and  stables,  in  good  repair.  There  are  about  100  acres  of 
cleared  land,  fit  for  raising  any  kind  of  grain,  and  allowed, 
by  competent  judges,  to  be  the  best  land  in  that  part  of  the 
Jerseys.  There  are  about  40  acres  of  drained  meadow, 
which  require  but  a  short  bank;  about  200  acres  of  ex- 
ceeding good  high  marsh,  firm  enough  to  bear  a  loaded 
team  over  any  part  of  it;  and  near  the  middle  of  said 
marsh  there  is  an  island  which  stands  high,  of  about  4 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

acres,  with  stately  oak  and  hickory  trees  on  it,  and  affords 
a  fine  shelter  for  cattle.  There  is  a  creek  that  leads  to  it, 
navigable  for  a  small  boat.  The  remainder  180  acres,  is 
fine  timber  land,  consisting  of  very  large  poplar,  white 
oak  and  hickory,  with  plenty  of  rail  timber.  There  is  a 
fine  apple  orchard,  and  a  great  number  of  peach  trees  that 
never  fail  bearing,  in  great  plenty;  the  whoil  soil  naturally 
produces  great  store  of  white  clover.  If  any  person  in- 
clines to  purchase  the  abovementioned  premises,  they  may 
enter  on  them  the  25th  of  March,  and  the  conditions  of 
sale  known,  by  applying  to 

THOMAS  CASH. 

N.  B.  If  the  above  place  is  not  sold  by  the  ist  of  March, 
it  will  then  be  lett  on  good  terms,  to  any  person  who  will 
engage  to  improve  it,  as  may  be  agreed  on  by  the  parties. 

Newtown  Township,  Gloucester  County,  Jan.  16,  1769. 

WHEREAS  JUDY,  the  wife  of  JOHN  ROBINSON,  has 
eloped  from  her  said  husband,  without  any  cause,  and  run 
him  in  debt;  this  serves  to  forbid  all  persons  from  trusting 
her  on  his  account,  as  he  will  pay  no  debts  of  her  contract- 
ing from  the  date  hereof. 

JOHN  ROBINSON 

Burlington,  January  9,  1769. 

WAS  committed  to  the  goal  of  the  county  of  Burling- 
ton on  the  5th  day  of  this  instant  January,  a  certain  man 
supposed  to  be  a  runaway,  a  Cooper  by  trade,  about  29 
or  30  years  of  age,  says  he  was  born  in  the  county  of 
Derry,  in  Ireland,  and  came  to  this  country  with  Captain 
Corwell,  7  years  ago,  he  goes  by  the  name  of  JOSEPH 
BENNIN  alias  BENNETT,  very  much  pockmarked,  with 
short  black  hair;  has  on  an  old  brown  nap  jacket,  with  a 
blue  under  ditto,  black  velvet  breeches,  and  black  stock- 
ings, and  check  shirt.  His  master,  if  any  he  has,  is  hereby 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  359 

desired  to  come,  pay  charges,  and  take  him  away,  in  five 
weeks  from  the  date  hereof  otherwise  he  will  be  sold  for 
the  same,  by  me 

EPHRAIM  PHILIPS,  Coaler. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2091,  January  19, 
1769. 

TO  BE  LETT, 
For  a  TERM  of  TEN  YEARS. 

A  PLANTATION  on  Woodbury  Creek,  in  Deptford- 
township,  county  of  Gloucester,  and  West  New- Jersey, 
without  any  expence  of  banks,  and  between  seventy  and 
eighty  acres  of  excellent  meadow,  that  will  produce  from 
two  to  four  ton  of  English  hay  per  acre  at  one  crop,  with 
about  sixty  acres  of  plow  land,  an  orchard  of  about  two 
hundred  bearing  trees,  a  good  dwelling  house,  barn  and 
out-houses,  nine  miles  from  William  Cooper's  ferry,  and 
two  miles  from  Ladd's  Cove,  and  thence  five  miles  by 
water  to  Philadelphia;  it  being  pleasantly  situated  about 
a  mile  from  Delaware  river,  and  will  suit  well  for  carry- 
ing on  a  dairy  or  grazing,  or  both :  may  be  entered  upon 
the  twenty  fifth  of  March  next.  For  farther  particulars' 
enquire  of  the  subscriber,  living  on  the  premises. 

ABRAHAM  CHATTIN. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1363,  January  19, 
1769. 

ABSCONDED  from  his  bail  on  the  ist  inst.  January,  one 
Matthew  Johnson,  of  a  fair  complexion,  has  dark  brown 
hair,  about  5  feet  10  or  n  inches  high,  is  much  given  to 
drink,  and  stoops  a  little  in  his  walk :  Had  on  a  pair  of 
old  leather  breeches,  old  blue  duffil  trowsers,  patched  with 
a  piece  of  striped  flannel  from  the  waistband  to  the  knee- 
band,  old  green  under  jacket,  light  coloured  cloth  coat, 


360  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

and  half-worn  beaver  hat.  He  was  bred  in  Bucks  county 
squeaks  a  little  in  his  speech,  is  about  26  years  of  age,  and 
has  little  or  no  beard.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said 
Matthew  Johnson,  so  that  he  may  be  brought  to  justice, 
shall  receive  Six  Dollars  reward,  and  all  reasonable  char- 
ges, paid  by  WILLIAM  SOWDER,  in  Gloucester  county,  near 
Raccoon  creek.— Postscript  to  the  Pennsylvania  Chronicle, 
No.  106,  for  January  23,  1769. 

This  Day  is  published,  (Price  Six  Pence)  and  to  be  sold 
by  the  Printer  hereof, 

LIBERTY  A  POEM 
Lately  found  in  a  Bundle  of  Papers,  said  to  be  written  by 

A  HERMIT  IN  NEW-JERSEY. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  107,  January  23- 
30,  1769. 

To  be  LETT,  in  the  Broadway,  opposite  the  Bowling- 
Green,  a  convenient  House Any  Person  inclin- 
able to  rent  the  same,  may  enquire  of  Joshua  Mullock, 
nearly  opposite  Mr.  David  Clerkson's,  in  the  Broadway 

Who  has  for  Sale,  Shrewsbury  Butter,  in  Firkins. 

RuN-away,  in  New- York,  from  the  Subscriber,  living 
at  Middletown- Point,  in  East  New-Jersey,  last  November, 
a  Negro  Man  named  JIM,  speaks  both  English  and  Dutch, 
about  30  Years  old,  a  slim  Fellow,  and  much  pitted  with 
the  Small  Pox :  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  red 
Watch  Coat  and  Tow  Trowsers.  Whoever  takes  up  and 
secures  the  said  Negro  Fellow,  so  that  he  may  be  had 
again,  shall  receive  Thirty  Shillings  Reward,  and  all  rea- 
sonable Charges  from 

WILLIAM  HYER 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
goo,  January  23,  1769. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  36 1 

Secretary's  Office,  New-Jersey. 

SEVERAL  Probates,  Administrations,  and  Deeds,  have 
for  some  Years  past  remained  in  the  Officer  of  Burlington 
and  Amboy  uncalled  for,  to  the  great  Prejudice  of  the 
Officer :  The  Persons  concerned  are  desired  to  call  upon 
Ravaude  Kearney,  Esq;  at  Perth- Amboy,  and  Mr.  Joseph 
Read,  at  Burlington,  and  take  the  same  away,  and  thereby 
prevent  the  necessity  of  publishing  a  particular  List. 

AT  ETNA  Furnace,  Burlington  County,  which  -will  be- 
gin to  be  in  Blast  the  Middle  of  April,  are  wanted,  a  good 
Keeper,  two  Master-Colliers,  Moulders  and  Stock-takers : 
Those  who  apply  in  Season,  and  come  well  recommended, 
will  be  encouraged.  The  Wood  should  be  running  in  Feb- 
ruary, or  beginning  of  March. — The  New  York  Gazette 
or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1360,  January  23,  1769. 

RUN  away  on  the  23d  of  this  instant  January,  from  the 
subscriber,  living  in  the  county  of  Burlington,  and  prov- 
ince of  New- Jersey,  a  Welsh  servant  man,  named  JOHN 
JENKINS,  about  26  years  of  age,  5  feet  4  inches  high,  a 
fresh  looking  man,  with  black  straight  hair ;  had  on,  when 
he  went  away,  a  thick  kersey  jacket,  old  leather  breeches, 
a  little  coarse  felt  hat,  bound  round  the  brim,  two  ozen- 
brigs  shirts,  and  took  with  him,  a  little  ozenbrigs  bag,  with 
one  jacket  of  the  sort  abovementioned,  one  pair  of  stock- 
ings, and  one  ozenbrigs  shirt  in  the  bag.  .Whoever  takes 
up  and  secures  said  servant  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  goals, 
or  brings  him  to  his  master,  shall  have  Three  Pounds  re- 
ward, and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

ISAAC  HAINS. 

N.  B.  All  masters  of  vessels,  and  others,  are  forbid  to 
harbour  or  conceal  said  servant,  or  they  may  expect  to  be 
prosecuted  as  the  law  directs. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette, 
No.  2092,  January  26,  1769. 


362  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Sussex  County,  Oxford  Township,  January  24,  1769. 

RUN  away  from  his  bail,  on  or  about  the  ist  day  of  De- 
cember last,  a  man  that  went  by  the  name  of  SAMUEL 
THATCHER,  but  it  is  supposed  that  he  has  changed  his 
name,  and  may  now  go  by  some  other;  he  is  about  5  feet 
9  inches  high,  wears  his  hair  tied,  though  somewhat  short, 
and  of  a  sandy  colour;  he  is  a  carpenter  by  trade,  and  is  a 
talkative  fellow,  and  often  talks  of  an  estate  he  has  at  New- 
ark, in  East-New-Jersey,  at  which  place  he  says  his  friends 
live.  Whoever  will  secure  him  in  any  of  his  Majesty's 
gaols,  so  that  the  subscriber  may  get  him  again,  shall  re- 
ceive a  reward  of  Thirty  Shillings,  to  be  paid  by 

ASHER  CARTER. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  108,  January  30- 
Feb.  6,  1769. 

Boston,  January  19.  With  Captain  Rowland  came 
over  the  commissions  for  our  new  American  judges  of  the 

Admiralty,  viz Hon.  Jared  Ingersoll,  Esq; 

for  New- York,  New-Jersey,  Pennsylvania,  Maryland  and 
Virginia.  The  Salaries  of  each  £.  600  Sterling,  per  An- 
num, payable  out  of  the  Fines  and  Forfeitures  in  America.1 
— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  901, 
January  30;  1769. 

PHILADELPHIA,  February  2. 

We  hear  the  King  has  been  pleased  to  appoint  RICHARD 
STOCKTON,  Esq;  of  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  Counsel- 
lor at  Lazv,  to  be  one  of  his  Majesty's  Council  for  that 
Province.2 

iThis  was  one  of  the  most  obnoxious  measures  imposed  on  the  Col- 
onies by  the  mother  country,  and  was  largely  influential  in  hastening 
the  Revolution.  The  Admiralty  Courts  were  administered  by  the 
Judges,  without  juries,  and  it  was  made  directly  to  their  interest  to 
convict  the  accused,  and  so  swell  their  emoluments.  Their  jurisdiction 
was  extended  to  include  the  enforcement  of  the  shipping-,  revenue  and 
other  laws,  and  so  these  Courts  became  most  offensive  instruments  of 
oppression. 

2  For  a  sketch  of  Richard  Stockton,  see  N.  J.  Archives,  X,  427. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  363 

To  be  SOLD  on  CREDIT, 

A  Goor5  PLANTATION,  on  Little  Egg  Harbour;  one 
third  of  which  is  as  good  meadow  as  any  on  that  shore; 
and  part  of  the  upland  well  dunged ;  has  on  it  a  new  two 
story  house,  with  a  barn,  &c.  Is  extremely  well  situated 
for  fishing  and  fowling.  Also  about  25  acres  of  choice 
marsh  on  Oldman's  creek,  ready  banked  in.  Any  person 
who  purchases  either  of  the  said  tracts  of  land,  may  have 
lool.  cash  (if  wanted)  to  help  improve  and  stock  them, 
and  considerable  time  will  be  allowed  for  payment,  by 
giving  good  security,  and  paying  interest.  For  further 
particulars,  enquire  of  the  subscriber  in  Market-street, 
Philadelphia. 

WILLIAM  SITZGREAVES 

N.  B.  Said  Sitzgreaves  continues  the  VENDUE  for  the 
public  sale  of  all  sorts  of  goods  &c.  on  Fridays  and  Sat- 
urdays, as  usual;  and  his  friends,  and  others,  who  please 
to  favour  him  with  their  custom,  may  depend  on  his  best 
endeavours  to  please  them. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette, 
No.  2093,  February  2,  1769. 

NEW-YORK,  December  26. 

On  Saturday  night  about  12  o'clock  arrived  in  a  pilot- 
boat  from  Sandy-Hook,  Eliphalet  Neal,  late  master  of 
the  schooner  Felicity,  from  Piscataway,1  bound  to  North 
Carolina,  with  rum,  &c.  Nath.  Rand,  mate,  and  super- 
cargo, Wm.  Thresher  and  Paul  Randell,  foremast  men, 

who  gave  the  following  account They  left  Piscataway 

the  ist  instant,  had  bad  weather  and  contrary  winds,  till 
they  passed  the  Vineyard;  on  Monday  the  i6th  had  hard 
gales,  which  obliged  them  to  lie  too,  most  of  the  time  till 
Thursday,  when  it  grew  moderate  and  almost  calm.  Fri- 
day afternoon  made  the  Highland  off  the  Neversinks, 

iNew  Hampshire. 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

about  3  or  4  leagues  distant;  at  7  discovered  a  leak,  which 
gained  upon  them  6  inches  in  less  than  ten  minutes,  though 
the  pumps  were  going.  They  then  got  out  the  boat,  and 
had  only  time  to  take  a  very  few  cloaths  and  a  compass, 
before  the  vessel  sunk  to  the  water's  edge;  a  large  swell 
driving  out  to  sea;  they  left  the  Vessel,  at  about  n  got 
ashore  near  Sandy-Hook,  sent  out  a  pilot  boat  to  search 
for  the  vessel,  but  found  only  the  binnacle,  a  caboose,  and 
sugar-box,  so  that  probably  the  vessel  had  sunk. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1365,  February  2,  1769. 

Nezv-York,  February  6.  Saturday  the  28th  ult.  died 
at  his  House  at  New  Barbados  Neck  in  Bergen  County, 
aged  89  Years,  Warner  Richards,  Esq;  he  was  born  in  the 
Island  of  Barbados,  and  was  the  last  Survivor  of  a  Num- 
ber of  Gentlemen,  who  came  from  that  Island,  and  pur- 
chased that  Neck  upwards  of  -60  Years  ago.  He  was  re- 
markable for  a  very  vigorous  and  strong  Constitution. 

We  hear  from  Newark,  that  late  on  Saturday  Night 
last,  the  House  of  Moses  Ogden,  Esq;  catch'd  on  Fire, 
and  was  entirely  consumed,  with  all  the  Furniture  therein ; 
and  it  was  with  the  greatest  Difficulty  the  Family  escaped. 
A  Negro  Boy  unhappily  perished  in  the  Flames.  'Ti>  sup- 
posed that  Mr.  Ogden's  Loss  will  amount  to  £.  1000. 

To  BE  LET, 

A  Very  genteel  House,  in  Newark,  in  East  New- Jersey, 
two  Stories  high,  containing  Eight  Rooms  with  Fire- 
places, a  spacious  Garret,  and  a  Cellar  under  the  whole 
House,  with  a  handsome  Kitchen,  and  a  new  Barn.  Also 
about  3  Acres  of  choice  Land  adjoining  the  same.  The 
House  is  beautifully  situated  in  the  Front  or  Market- 
Square,  leading  to  Pasaick  River,  and  about  100  Yards 
Distance  from  the  English  Church.  Inquire  of  Isaac  Og- 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  365 

den,  Esq;  at  Newark,  or  Philip  Van  Cortlandt,  at  Jam- 
aica on  Long  Island. 

Middlesex  County.  )  Pursuant  to  an  Order  of  Stephen 
New-Jersey,  j  Skinner  and  Jonathan  Frazee, 
Esqrs;  two  of  the  Judges  of  the  said  County  Court  of 
Middlesex,  upon  the  Petition  of  David  Burton,  an  insol- 
vent Debtor;  Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  Creditors  of 
said  Burton,  to  appear  at  the  City  of  Perth-Amboy,  on 
Tuesday  the  28th  Day  of  February  next,  at  Twelve 
o'Clock,  of  said  Day,  to  shew  Cause,  if  any  be,  why  an 
assignment  of  the  said  Debtor's  Estate,  should  not  be 
made  to  Daniel  Griggs,  or  any  other  Person  as  the  Judges 
should  choose,  and  the  said  Debtor  be  discharged  from  his 
Debts  and  Confinement,  pursuant  to  an  Act  of  the  Gov- 
ernor, Council,  and  General  Assembly,  passed  at  Perth- 
Amboy,  in  April  1768,  for  the  Relief  of  Insolvent  Debt- 
ors. 

February  2d,  1769.  DAVID  BURTON 

To  BE  SOLD, 

At  private  Sale,  and  may  be  entered  upon  the  First  of 
April  next. 

Two  valuable  Plantations,  one  of  them  adjoining 
Princetown,  in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  containing 
about  270  Acres,  25  of  which  is  Meadow  of  the  best  sort, 
about  35  Acres  of  Wood  Land,  the  Remainder  exceeding 
good  for  any  Kind  of  Grain  or  Pasture,  and  is  well 
watered  with  many  fine  Springs,  &c.  There  is  on  the 
Premises,  a  large  two  Story  House,  with  three  Rooms  and 
an  Entry  on  the  first  Floor,  and  five  on  the  Second,  all 
well  finished,  with  a  large  Kitchen,  a  Milk-House,  with 
a  Spring  in  it,  a  Granary,  a  Barn,  40  Feet  by  32;  all 
which  are  built  of  Stone,  and  covered  with  Cedar,  and  are 


366  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

now  in  good  Repair,  with  plenty  of  Orcharding  of  grafted 
Fruit,  &c. 

The  other  Plantation  is  near  Kingston,  and  about  3 
Miles  from  Princeton,  and  contains  about  330  Acres,  about 
50  of  which  is  good  Meadow,  and  about  130  Acres  of  it 
Wood  Land,  the  Remainder  good  for  Grain  or  Pasture, 
and  the  whole  well  watered :  There  is  on  the  Premises  a 
good  new  Dwelling-House  and  Kitchen,  a  large  Barn, 
Stable,  &c.  with  plenty  of  Orcharding,  and  other  Fruit 
Trees,  &c.  Any  Person  or  Persons,  inclining  to  purchase, 
may  apply  to  the  Subscribers,  adjoining  Princeton,  who 
are  Executors  to  the  Estate  of  Samuel  Horner,  deceased; 
and  have  it  in  their  Power  to  make  an  indisputable  Title 
to  the  abovementioned  Plantations.  Reasonable  Payments 
will  be  given  without  Interest :  The  Purchasers  upon  pay- 
ing a  few  Hundred  Pounds  down,  may  have  several 
Years  to  pay  the  rest,  allowing  Interest  after  the  Money 
becomes  due. 

JOSEPH  HORNOR,      ) 

ROBERT  STOCKTON,  [   Executors 

MARY  HORNOR,  Executrix. 


Perth- Amboy,  February  6,  1769. 

BY  order  of  Stephen  Skinner  and  Jonathan  Frazee, 
Esqrs;  judges  of  the  inferior  courts  of  common  pleas  for 
the  county  of  Middlesex,  in  the  province  of  New- Jersey : 
Notice  is  hereby  given,  to  the  creditor  or  Creditors  of 
Thomas  Auten,  John  Smith  and  Obadiah  Ring,  insolvent 
debtors,  in  the  goal  of  the  said  county,  to  shew  cause,  (if 
any  they  have)  before  the  said  judges,  at  the  house  of  Eli- 
jah Dunham,  innholder  in  the  city  of  Perth-Amboy,  on 
Tuesday  the  twenty-eighth  day  of  February,  why  an  as- 
signment of  the  said  debtors  estates  respectively,  should 
not  be  made,  and  the  said  Thomas  Auten,  John  Smith,  and 
Obadiah  Ring,  discharged,  pursuant  to  the  direction  of  a 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  367 

late  act  of  the  Governor,  Council,  and  General  Assembly, 
entitled  "An  act  for  the  relief  of  insolvent  debtors." — The 
New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1362,  Febru- 
ary 6,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD,  at  public  vendue,  on  Friday  the  loth  day 
of  March  next,  all  the  real  estate  of  Isaiah  Younglove,  in 
the  township  of  Bridgewater,  in  Somerset  county  and 
province  of  New- Jersey,  viz.  one  farm,  whereon  he  now 
dwells,  containing  about  160  acres  of  land,  whereon  is  a 
new  comfortable  dwelling  house,  with  a  good  cellar  and 
four  fire  places;  a  good  barn  and  thriving  young  orchard 
of  about  400  apple  trees,  a  considerable  quantity  of  the 
land,  cleared  and  in  good  fence,  pleasantly  situated,  on 
a  public  road,  about  one  mile  and  a  half  from  Bound 
Brook  town;  also  12  acres  of  meadow  ground,  near  the 
above  premises;  as  also  another  plantation  of  about  100 
acres,  whereon  is  a  new  framed  house  and  other  conve- 
niences, a  young  orchard  and  plenty  of  meadow,  and  also 
a  small  tract  of  about  18  acres,  with  a  saw  mill  in  good 
repair,  situated  in  the  midst  of  a  great  plenty  of  good  tim- 
ber, &c.  the  terms  of  payment  made  very  easy,  and  the 
purchaser  may  enter  on  the  same  by  the  first  of  May  next, 
as  he  purposes  to'move  out  of  this  province,  as  soon  as  his 
concerns  are  settled,  &c. 

Said  vendue  to  be  held  on  the  premises,  and  to  begin  at 
12  o'clock  of  said  day,  where  due  attendance  will  be  given. 

ISAIAH  YOUNGLOVE. 

N.  B.  The  title  indisputable.  Feb.  4th,  1769.— The 
New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1362,  Feb- 
ruary 9,  1 769. 

Gloucester  County,  February  7,  1769. 
Was  committed  to  the  Goal  of  this  County,  a  certain 
Englishman  (who  calls  himself  Walter  Maloney)  on  Sus- 


368  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

picion  of  being  a  Runaway,  says  he  is  a  free  Man,  but  he 
is  thought  to  be  the  Man  advertised  in  the  Pennsylvania 
Gazette  of  October  18  last,  by  John  Strawbridge,  of  Mary- 
land, by  the  Name  of  John  Robinson,  as  he  answers  the 
Description  of  said  Person;  therefore  his  Master,  if  any 
he  has,  is  desired  to  come,  pay  Charges,  and  take  him 
away  in  three  Weeks  from  this  Date,  or  he  will  be  sold 

out  for  his  Charges,  by 

JOSIAH  CHATTIN,  Goaler. 

—The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2094,  February  9, 
1769. 

On  Tuesday  last  a  Trenton  shallop  transporting  from 
one  wharf  to  another,  was  overset  by  the  wind,  and  is  not- 
withstanding all  endeavours,  froze  in  the  ice,  about  a  mile 
from  this  city.  The  people  saved  themselves  in  their  boat. 

GOOD  COLLIERS  and  FORGE  MEN,  bringing  recommen- 
dations, and  a  good  KEEPER,  will  meet  with  encourage- 
ment at  Etna  Furnace  and  Tanton  Forge,  in  Burlington 
county,  sixteen  miles  from  Philadelphia.  The  COLLIERS 
should  be  there  by  the  loth  of  March. — The  Pennsylvania 
Journal,  No.  1366,  February  9,  1769. 

V 

The  Sale  of  WILLIAM  IM LAY'S  Estate,  in  Bordentown, 
is  to  be  on  Wednesday,  the  first  of  March  next. 

February  20,  1769. 

To  be  sold  by  public  sale,  on  the  nth  day  of  March  next, 
at  3  o'clock  in  the  afternoon  (if  not  disposed  of  by  pri- 
vate sale  at  any  time  before)  at  William  Cooper's  ferry, 
opposite  the  city  of  Philadelphia,  in  the  county  of  Glou- 
cester, 
A  Valuable  PLANTATION  and  TRACT  of  LAND  (late  the 

estate  of  Samuel  Bonnell,  deceased)  situate  in  the  town- 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  569 

ship  of  Waterford,  in  the  county  of  Gloucester,  in  the 
western  division  of  the  province  of  New- Jersey,  contain- 
ing 130  acres  and  an  half,  or  thereabouts,  bounded  by 
lands  of  John  Shivers  and  Francis  Bonnell,  now  in  the 
tenure  of  Benjamin  Archer,  with  a  good  frame  dwelling- 
house  and  barn  erected  thereon,  pleasantly  situated  on 
Cooper's  creek,  and  within  four  miles  of  the  city  of  Phil- 
adelphia, where  garden  truck  may  be  raised  in  great 
plenty,  and  brought  to  Philadelphia  market  by  water. 
There  are  about  17  acres  of  choice  good  meadow,  part 
whereof  is  under  good  bank.  The  upland  is  good  in  kind ; 
about  50  acres  cleared,  and  the  rest  choice  good  wood 
land,  and  very  well  watered.  Any  person  inclining  to 
purchase,  may  be  assured  that  the  title  is  indisputable,  and 
paying  one  half  the  purchase  money  in  hand,  may  have 
twelve  months  credit  for  the  other  half,  giving  security 
and  paying  interest.  • 

And  on  the  I3th  day  of  March  next,  at  the  London 
Coffee-House,  at  6  o'clock  in  the  evening,  will  be  sold,  by 
public  vendue,  a  convenient  brick  messuage  or  tenement 
and  lot  of  ground,  situate  on  the  bank  of  the  river  Dela- 
ware, between  Sassafras  and  Vine  streets,  in  the  city  of 
Philadelphia,  now  in  the  tenure  of  the  widow  White 
(being  the  late  dwelling-house  of  the  late  Samuel  Bon- 
nell, deceased)  containing  in  breadth  on  Front-street  and 
Water-street  15  feet,  and  in  length  or  depth  from  Front- 
street  to  Water-street,  under  the  quitrent,  or  proprietary 
thirds  of  One  Shilling  sterling  per  foot  per  annum;  and 
also  under  the  ground-rent  of  Forty-five  Shillings  ster- 
ling per  annum.  For  further  particulars  inquire  of  us  the 
subscribers,  in  Philadelphia,  SARAH  BONNELL,  Executrix, 
THOMAS  BONNELL,  PETER  THOMSON,  Executors. — The 
Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  no,  February  13-20,  1769. 

To  be  sold,  a  very  good  grist-mill,  with  two  pair  of 

24: 


37°  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

stones,  the  bolting  works  all  going  by  water-;  a  good  full- 
ing-mill, press  house  and  dying  house,  all  in  good  repair, 
and  standing  on  a  constant  stream ;  with  two  good  dwell- 
ing-houses, barn,  orchard,  and  112  acres  of  good  land, 
with  wood  land  and  meadow  sufficient  for  the  use  of  the 
place  included,  situated  in  a  fine  wheat  country,  within 
three  miles  of  New-Brunswick,  at  a  place  known  by  the 
name  of  Lawrence's  Brook;  there  is  also  a  prospect  of 
good  iron  mine,  some  of  the  ore  having  been  tried,  and 
proves  exceeding  good.  Any  body  inclining  to  purchase, 
may  apply  to  me,  the  subscriber,  living  near  the  premises, 
who  will  agree  on  reasonable  terms,  and  give  an  indis- 
putable title. 

FULCARD  VAN  NORDSTRAND. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
903,  February  13,  1769. 
• 

Burlington,  Feb.  13,  1769. 

To  be  SOLD  by  public  vendue,  at  the  several  times  fol- 
lowing (if  not  before  disposed  of  at  private  sale)  the  fol- 
lowing described  plantations  and  tracts  of  land,  being  part 
of  the  estate  of  John  Gosling,  late  of  the  County  of  Glou- 
cester, deceased,  viz.  On  Monday,  the  27th  of  February 
instant,  at  the  house  where  the  said  Gosling  died,  a  good 
dwelling-house,  and  tract  of  land,  containing  about  20 
acres,  situate  in  the  said  county  on  the  Quohacking  road; 
one  half  thereof  is  good  meadow,  bounded  on  Raccoon 
Creek;  the  said  place  is  very  suitable  either  for  a  store, 
tavern,  or  any  other  public  business.  Also  a  valuable 
plantation,  containing  about  300  acres,  situate  in  the  said 
county,  about  two  miles  from  the  plantation  of  Mr.  Jacob 
Spicer,  with  a  frame  house,  good  orchard,  and  a  large 
quantity  of  meadow  on  the  premises,  part  thereof  im- 
proved. On  Tuesday,  the  7th  of  March  next,  at  the  house 
of  Joseph  Burroughs,  Innkeeper  in  Salem,  a  valuable 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3/1 

plantation,  containing  about  320  acres,  situate  in  the  town- 
ship of  Manington,  in  the  county  of  Salem,  having  a 
brick  house,  barn,  and  other  buildings,  and  a  bearing  orch- 
ard thereon,  and  esteemed  as  good  land  for  wheat  and 
grass  as -any  in  the  said  county;  together  with  a  piece  of 
unimproved  marsh,  about  two  miles  from  the  said  planta- 
tion, containing  about  60  acres.  And  on  the  eleventh  of 
April  next,  at  the  house  of  William  Hugg,  in  Gloucester, 
will  be  sold  a  valuable  saw-mill,  situate  on  Still-Run,  in 
the  county  of  Gloucester,  with  upwards  of  1500  acres  of 
land,  belonging  to  the  same,  having  thereon  a  great  quan- 
tity of  saw  timber,  both  oak  and  pine.  Also  a  town  lot  in 
Gloucester,  containing  about  half  an  acre;  together  with 
sundry  shares  or  rights  of  propriety  to  unlocated  lands. 
Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the  above  premises,  or 
to  view  the  same  before  the  days  of  sale,  may  apply  to  the 
said  Jacob  Spicer,  or  to  Mr.  Jacob  Richman,  of  Pilesgrove, 
in  Salem  county.  The  conditions  of  payment  will  be  made 
known  at  the  days  of  sale  by 

JOHN  LAWRENCE,  and  WILLIAM  SMITH,  Trustees. 

N.  B.  The  sale  will  begin  at  10  o'clock  in  the  morning 
on  each  of  the  above  days. — The  Pennsylvania  Gazette, 
No.  2095,  February  16,  1769. 

The  Trenton  Shallop,  mention'd  in  our  last  to  be  froze 
in  the  ice,  has  since  been  cut  out  and  got  into  a  dock  with- 
out receiving  much  damage. — The  Pennsylvania  Journal, 
No.  1367,  February  16,  1769. 

Yesterday  arrived  the  Snow  King  George,  Capt.  Potts. 
He  came  from  Lisbon,  and  took  a  Pilot  on  board  at  Cape 
May,  but  was  blown  off  and  obliged  to  put  into  New 
York. — The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  in,  February 
20-27,  1769. 


372  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

THIS  is  to  give  notice,  that  there  will  be  sold  at  public 
vendue,  on  Wednesday  the  I5th  March  next,  at  two 
o'clock  in  the  afternoon,  at  the  house  where  Joshua  Hur- 
tin  lives,  in  the  town  of  Newark,  all  that  house,  barn, 
cyder-mill,  and  home-lot.  Any  person  or  persons  inclin- 
ing to  purchase  the  whole,  or  have  it  divided  into  three 
or  four  lots,  may  have  it  so,  by  applying  to  Joseph  Crane, 
at  Watsesson :  It  is  very  well  situated  for  a  tradesman 
or  any  other  publick  business.  The  Conditions  of  sale  will 
be  known  at  the  time  of  sale. 

MADE  his  Escape  near  Prince-Town,  from  Robert  Ma- 
gee,  and  others,  one  David  Lindsey,  who  was  in  Custody 
for  Theft :  He  is  a  thin  pale  visag'd  Man,  has  long  brown 
Hair,  grey  Eyes,  pitted  with  the  Small-Pox,  had  on  a 
brown  Coat  and  double  breasted  Waistcoat,  old  Hat  and 
Leather  Breeches ;  and  has  the  Letters  D.  L.  on  his  Hand ; 
a  Pair  of  Trowsers  which  serves  for  a  Wallet,  with  a  Pair 
of  Stays,  and  sundry  Cloaths  therein;  he  likewise  has  a 
Pass  from  two  Justices  of  the  Peace,  Skilton,  and  Embly. 
Whoever  secures  the  said  Thief,  so  that  he  may  be  brought 
to  Justice,  shall  receive  three  Pounds,  Proc.  and  all  rea- 
sonable Charges,  paid  by  Robert  Magee,  living  near  Cran- 
berry, New- Jersey.  All  Masters  of  Vessels  are  fore- 
warned not  to  carry  him  off  at  their  Peril. — The  New 
York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercufy,  No.  904,  February 
20,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  CERTAIN  tract  of  land,  in  the  township  of  Greenwich, 
Gloucester  county,  and  in  the  western  division  of  the  prov- 
ince of  New-Jersey,  containing  about  180  acres,  which 
lieth  between  two  branches  of  Homan's  Creek,  or  other- 
wise Repaupo  Creek,  one  mile  and  a  half  from  a  good 
landing;  the  creek  extends  along  side  of  the  said  tract, 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  373 

and  with  a  trifling  expence  might  be  cleared  out  so  as  to 
raft  logs,  and  carry  wood  and  staves  from  along  side  of 
the  tract,  which  would  prevent  some  ex  pence  in  carting; 
this  tract  is  remarkably  the  best  timber  land  in  these  parts 
that  is  so  near  the  landing;  it  has  a  great  quantity  of  white 
and  red  oak  stave  timber  and  logs,  also  hickory;  there 
may  be  30  acres  of  good  meadow  made,  and  there  is  tim- 
ber swamp  that  would  make  good  mowing  ground.  It  is 
thought  as  timber  grows  scarce  this  land  would  suit  ship 
builders,  coopers,  brewers,  &c,  &c.  The  soil  is  remark- 
ably good,  so  that  after  the  timber  is  off,  the  land  will  be 
valuable,  and  would  make  a  good  plantation,  there  being 
upwards  of  100  apple  trees  on  the  premises.  The  title  is 
indisputable.  Any  person  or  persons  inclining  to  view 
the  premises,  may,  at  the  day  of  sale,  at  the  house  of  Sol- 
omon Lippincott,  joining  the  premises,  when  the  sub- 
scriber will  attend  to  shew  the  same,  and  the  conditions 
made  known.  The  sale  to  begin  on  the  nth  Day  of 
March,  at  2  o'clock  in  the  afternoon. 

GEORGE  READING.1 

Salem  County,  February  21,  1769. 
WHEREAS  Thomas  Hewett,  of  Gloucester  County  and 
Province  of  West- Jersey,  obtained  of  me,  the  Subscriber, 
two  Promissory  Notes,  dated  the  First  Day  of  October 
last,  the  one  for  about  Six  Pounds,  payable  the  First  of 
this  Instant;  the  other  for  about  Three  Pounds  Fifteen 
Shillings,  payable  next  May;  which  Notes  were  obtained 
of  me  in  a  fraudulent  and  deceitful  Manner,  I  not  having 

i  George  Reading,  b.  in  Amwell,  N.  J.,  Feb.  26,  1725,  was  a  son  of 
John  Reading  (sometime  President  of  the  Council  and  acting  Governor 
of  New  Jersey)  and  Mary  Ryerson,  his  wife,  dau.  of  Joris  (i.  e.,  George) 
Ryerson,  of  Pacquanac,  in  the  present  Passaic  county.  He  inherited 
from  his  father  extensive  tracts  of  land.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Assembly,  1761-5,  and  was  appointed  Surrogate  in  1774.  Early  in  the 
Revolution  he  removed  to  Westmoreland  county,  Pa.,  where  he  was 
commissioned  Sub-Lieutenant,  with  rank  as  Lieutenant-Colonel,  and 
was  recommissioned  June  2,  1780.  In  this  year  he  removed  to  what 
was  afterwards  Bourbon  county,  Ky.,  where  he  died,  Aug.  12,  1792. 


\ 

374  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

any  Consideration  for  them,  and  the  said  Thomas  Hewett, 
at  that  Time  did,  and  now  doth,  owe  me  Money.  This  is 
therefore  to  forewarn  all  Persons  not  to  take  an  Assign- 
ment on  said  Notes,  or  either  of  them,  as  I  will  not  pay 
them,  they  being  obtained  as  aforesaid. 

HENRY  HEWETT 

The  subscriber  hereof,  having  heretofore  been  pos- 
sessed of  a  considerable  estate,  but  by  the  unforeseen  hard- 
ness of  the  times,  disappointments  and  losses  in  trade,  and 
other  ways,  has  rendered  him  unable  to  settle  with  his 
creditors,  to  their  full  demands;  he  having  already  sur- 
rendered and  delivered  up  his  all  to  them,  with  which  some 
of  said  creditors  are  willing  to  compound,  and  be  satisfied, 
but  others,  being  of  a  more  craving,  relentless  disposition, 
refuse  to  comply  with  any  terms,  till  the  whole  of  their 
debts  are  paid,  which  his  circumstances  render  him  in- 
capable to  do  at  present,  and  puts  him  under  the  disagree- 
able necessity,  as  the  last  resource,  to  seek  some  other 
method  for  aid.  These  are  therefore  to  give  notice,  to  all 
persons  concerned,  that  he  purposes  to  apply  to  the  next 
meeting  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  province  of  New- 
Jersey,  for  relief  in  the  premises. 

GEORGE  READING. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  private  SALE, 

PART  of  the  estate  of  Joseph  King,  late  of  the  township 
of  Amwell,  and  county  of  Hunterdon  and  province  of 
West- Jersey,  deceased,  consisting  of  a  grist  and  saw-mill, 
in  good  repair,  on  a  never-failing  stream,  known  by  the 
name  of  the  South-Branch  of  Rariton,  the  grist-mill  is 
fitting  either  for  country  or  merchant  work,  together  with 
25  acres  of  land,  belonging  to  said  mills,  on  which  is  a 
good  stone  dwelling  house,  together  with  a  good  frame 
dwelling  house,  having  a  very  good  well  at  the  door,  with 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  375 

a  good  frame  barn;    there  is  some  meadow,  and  a  young 
orchard,  belonging  to  said  tract. 

Another  tract,  containing  50  acres  of  land,  situate  on 
the  aforesaid  branch,  about  half  a  mile  distant  from  the 
aforesaid  mills,  on  which  is  a  frame  dwelling-house;  there 
is  some  good  meadow,  and  more  may  be  made,  with  plenty 
of  water,  on  said  tract.  Another  tract  of  146  acres,  ad- 
joining the  aforesaid  50  acre  tract,  about  40  acres  of  which 
is  cjeared,  the  remainder  well  timbered  and  watered,  on 
which  is  a  good  log  dwelling-house,  with  a  frame  room, 
under  which  is  a  good  cellar.  Any  person  or  persons,  in- 
clining to  purchase  all,  or  either  of  the  aforesaid  tracts, 
may  know  the  conditions,  by  applying  to 

GEORGE  KING,  and  JOHN  STEPHENSON/ Executors. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2096,  February  23, 
1769. 

ARRIVALS  at  JAMAICA. 
Schooner  Liberty,  Lambert  from  Salem. 
Brig   Johnson,    White,    from    Elizabeth    Town.— The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1368,  February  23,  1769. 

To  be  let  by  the  subscriber,  and  entered  upon  any  time 

after  the  nth  of  this  instant  March, 
A  LARGE  and  commodious  store  room  in  Princeton, 
next  door  to  the  sign  of  the  college,  which,  for  its  advan- 
tageous situation  exceeds  every  other  store  in  the  town, 
as  has  been  fully  demonstrated  by  the  great  quantity  of 
goods  retailed  the  last  year  by  the  present  store-keeper, 
which  I  have  good  reason  to  believe  exceeded  four  thou- 
sand pounds,  and  might  have  been  more  by  taking  in  pork, 
wheat  &c.  &c.  &c.  It  is  hardly  possible  for  a  single  person 
to  meet  with  a  more  desirable  situation  for  increasing  his 
fortune,  as  he  may  have  the  store  and  boarding  on  very 


376  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

reasonable  terms,  and  by  its  vicinity  to  Philadelphia  and 
New-York,  consequently  will  not  require  a  large  capital, 
as  goods  can  so  conveniently  be  had  from,  either  place,  the 
land  carriage  to  navigation  from  the  former  being  only 
about  twelve  miles,  from  the  latter  eighteen  miles,  besides 
the  conveniency  of  the  stage  waggons  from  both  places, 
which  meet  in  this  town  twice  a  week ;  by  their  conveyance 
may  be  had  a  great  number  of  articles,  not  commonly  kept 
in  a  country  store,  on  three  days  notice,  to  oblige  a  cus- 
tomer; besides  many  other  advantages  which  a  person 
conversant  in  trade  will  more  readily  comprehend  than  I 
can  describe.  For  terms  apply  to  William  Hick,  tavern- 
keeper,  at  the  sign  of  the  New- Jersey  College,  in  Prince- 
ton. A  personal  application  (if  any)  will  be  most  agree- 
able.—- — There  are  three  grist  mills,  the  furthest  from 
town  about  two  miles. 

WILLIAM  HICK. 

We  hear  from  Morris-Tozvn,  that  on  the  nth  Ult.  as 
one  Peter  Berry  was  rid{ng  down  a  Hill,  his  Horse  stum- 
bled, by  which  he  ivas  throzvn  down,  and  the  Horse  falling 
on  him  instantly  killed  him. — He  was  on  the  point  of  going 
to  Ireland,  ivhere  it  was  said  he  had  loool.  Sterling  lately 
bequeathed  to  him. 

And  on  the  i8th,  which  was  the  Saturday  following,  as 
David  Correy  was  driving  his  Team,  the  Horses  ran  with 
Violence  doivn  the  aforesaid  Hill,  and  by  the  Waggon 
giving  a  Jolt  over  a  Stone,  pitched  him  out,  when  the 
Wheels  run  over  his  Head.  He  continued  in  great  Misery 
till  the  Morning,  when  he  died. 

To  be  sold  by  the  SUBSCRIBER, 

Two  good  DWELLING-HOUSES,  one  of  which  is  pleas- 
antly situated  on  King-street,  near  the  middle  of  Trenton, 
being  a  large  two  story  building,  with  four  good  rooms  on 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  377 

a  floor,  and  convenient  fire-places  in  each;  there  is  a 
kitchen  adjoining,  and  two  cellars  under  the  house;  there 
is  likewise  a  one  story  building  adjoining  to  it,  containing 
two  good  rooms  on  a  floor,  with  fire-places  therein,  and 
may  be  used  as  a  separate  tenement,  or  very  convenient 
store,  for  which  it  has  been  long  used.  The  lot  is  66  feet 
in  front,  and  164  in  depth,  on  which  is  a  very  good  garden 
and  large  yard,  stable  and  well.  The  other  house  is  situ- 
ated on  the  same  street,  and  is  a  one  story  building,  with 
four  rooms  on  the  lower  and  two  on  the  upper  floor,  and 
fire-places  in  three  of  them,  and  a  good  cellar  under  the 
house.  The  lot  is  60  feet  front,  and  about  100  in  depth, 
writh  a  good  garden,  well  and  stable  thereon.  Any  person 
purchasing  and  paying  a  third  or  fourth  of  the  purchase- 
money,  may  have  the  remaining  payments  made  very  easy, 
on  paying  interest,  and  giving  good  security.  For  further 
particulars  inquire  of  Thomas  Barnes,  in  Trenton,  or  the 
subscriber,  living  in  Upper-Providence,  Chester  county. 

THOMAS  MOORE. 

N.  B.  The  subscriber  living  at  a  considerable  distance 
from  said  houses,  will  induce  him  to  sell  them  very  low. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  several  tracts  of  land  in  New- 
Jersey  and  Pennsylvania. 

One  tract  situate  in  the  county  of  Sussex,  adjoining  the 
lands  of  Peter  Y eager  and  others,  containing  287  acres. 
One  other  tract  of  417  acres,  in  the  said  county  and  town- 
ship of  Mansfield.  Wood  house  adjoining  lands  of  Sam- 
uel Johnson  and  John  Reading.  One  other  tract  in  the 
same  county,  and  township  of  Oxford,  containing  60  acres, 

adjoining  the  lands  of  William  Cox,  and Hollens- 

hcad.  One  other  tract  situated  in  the  county  of  Glouces- 
ter, adjoining  the  lands  of  Robert  Strettle,  aforesaid,  and 
the  lands  appurtenant  to  Fisher's  saw-mill,  con- 


NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

taining  84  acres. — Those  in  Pennsylvania  are  situate  in 

the  county  of  York These  lands  in  general  are 

well  watered,  and  great  opportunity  of  making  good 
meadow  on  most  of  them.  For  further  information,  re- 
specting the  conveniencies  and  advantages  attending  them, 
application  may  be  made  for  those  in  New-Jersey  to 
Charles  Stuart,  in  the  county  of  Sussex,  and  to  Jacob 
Richman,  Esq;  in  the  county  of  Gloucester;  for  those  in 
Pennsylvania,  to  William  Matthews,  surveyor,  in  York 
Tozvn,  or  to  William  M'Caskey,  on  Muddy-Creek,  Faun 
toivnship.  Reasonable  credit  and  indisputable  titles  will 
be  given  for  either  part  or  the  whole,  by  William  Brown, 
living  in  Dock-street,  Philadelphia,  who  is  legally  impow- 
ered  to  sell  the  same. 

ALL  persons  indebted  to  the  estate  pf  John  Comron,  of 
the  township  of  Greenwich,  in  the  county  of  Gloucester, 
in  the  western  division  of  the  province  of  New- Jersey, 
Shipwright,  deceased,  are  desired  to  make  speedy  pay- 
ment; and  those  who  have  any  demands  against  said  es- 
tate, to  bring  in  their  accounts,  that  they  may  be  adjusted 
by  MARY  COMRON,  Executrix,  and 

JACOB  SPICER,  Executor. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  112,  February 
27 '-March  6,  1769. 

To  be  let,  and  entered  upon  immediately,  the  dwelling- 
house  late  of  the  Hon.  Samuel  Woodruff,  Esq;  deceased, 
at  Elizabeth-Town,  in  New- Jersey :  This  is  a  very  large 
and  handsomely  finished  house,  with  two  wings ;  it  is  two 
stories  high,  and  has  four  large  rooms  on  a  floor,  with  a 
back  piazza  of  the  length  of  the  house.  The  wings  are 
also  two  stories  having  several  commodious  apartments; 
the  lot  contains  about  three  acres,  on  which  are  several 
convenient  out-buildings,  and  a  capacious  well  inclosed 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  379 

garden,  with  a  small  orchard  behind  it.  The  whole  in  the 
best  repair.  Also,  to  be  LET  immediately,  another  brick 
dwelling  house,  in  Elizabeth-Town  aforesaid,  which  was 
occupied  by  the  late  Widow  Hunloke.  It  is  two  stories 
high,  having  three  rooms  on  the  lower,  and  five  on  the 
upper  story.  There  is  also  a  convenient  garden,  with  sev- 
eral out-houses.  It  is  pleasantly  situated  on  Elizabeth 
river,  and  near  the  center  of  the  town.  Any  person  in- 
clining to  rent  either  of  the  above,  may  apply  to  the  sub- 
scriber at  Elizabeth-Town,  or  to  the  Revd.  Mr.  Joseph 
Treat,  or  Mr.  Lewis  Pintard,  in  New-York. 

N.  B.  All  persons  indebted,  to  the  estate  of  Joseph 
Woodruff,  jun.  lately  deceased,  are  desired  to  make  im- 
mediate payment,  there  being  a  necessity  for  closing  the 
accounts  of  said  estate;  And  all,  to  whom  the  said  estate 
is  indebted,  either  by  bond,  note,  or  account,  are  requested 
to  notify  the  subscribers,  and  Isaac  Woodruff,  Esq;  exec- 
utors of  said  estate,  of  the  particulars  of  their  respective 
demands. 

Elizabeth-Town  W.  P.  SMITH, 

Feb.  20,  1769.  ELIAS  BOUDTNOT. 

A  vendue  of  the  deceased's  houshold  furniture,  of  which 
several  articles  are  genteel  and  almost  new,  together  with 
some  slaves,  horses,  cattle,  two  riding  chairs,  &c.  will  be 
held  on  Wednesday  the  8th  of  March,  at  2  o'clock  P.  M. 
at  his  late  dwelling-house  at  Elizabeth-Town.  Also  two 
boats  in  good  order. — The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly 
Mercury,  No.  905,  February  27,  1769. 

New-York,  February  22,  1769. 
To  BE  SOLD, 

At  Publick  Vendue,  on  Monday  the  I3th  of  March  next, 
on  the  Premises. 


380  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

TPIE  House  and  Lot  of  Ground,  with  the  Ferry,  Dock 
and  Scow,  on  Bergen  Point:  As  also  three  Lots  of 
Ground  near  Mr.  Smith's  Ferry :  The  Vendtie  to  begin  at 
12  o'Clock,  by  us 

WILHELMUS  FREELAND, 
RICHARD  LAWRENCE. 

ALSO  to  be  Sold  by  jthe  said  Richard  Lawrence,  at  pri- 
vate Sale,  Two  other  Lots  on  Bergen  Point.  One  con- 
taining Twelve  Acres,  the  other  Six  Acres  and  three 
Quarters ;  they  are  both  fine  Wood  Land,  and  bound  upon 
the  Water.  Likewise  his  Farm,  on  the  North  Side  of 
Staten-Island,  near  the  Dutch  Church,  containing  81 
Acres  of  extraordinary  good  LTpland  and  10  Acres  of  salt 
Meadow  :  There  is  a  Ferry  now  erected  there,  right  oppo- 
site to  that  on  Bergen  Point,  and  is  the  best  Road  to  New 
York.  A  good  Title  will  be  given  by  the  said  RICHARD 
LAWRENCE. 

PURSUANT  to  an  Order  of  the  Hon.  Frederick  Smyth 
and  John  Berrian,  Esqrs.  two  of  the  Judges  of  the  Su- 
preme Court  for  the  Province  of  New-Jersey.  Whereas 
Cornelius  Swart,  a  Prisoner,  confined  in  the  Goal  of  the 
County  of  Monmouth,  has  applied  for  the  Benefit  of  a  late 
Act  passed  in  the  said  Province,  entitled  "An  Act  for  the 
Relief  of  Insolvent  Debtors,"  and  having  taken  the  Oath, 
and  filed  his  Schedule  agreeable  to  said  Act,  Now  this  is 
to  give  Notice,  to  the  Creditors  of  said  Swart,  to  meet  at 
the  Court-House,  in  the  City  of  Perth- Amboy,  on  Wed- 
nesday the  Fifth  Day  of  April  next,  at  ten  o'Clock  in  the 
Forenoon  of  the  same  Day,  to  shew  Cause  (if  any  they 
have)  why  an  Assignment  of  his  Estate  should  not  be 
made  to  such  Persons  as  shall  then  be  appointed,  and  he 
discharged  from  his  Confinement. — The  New  York  Ga- 
zette or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No.  1365,  February  27,  1769. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  3Sl 

Hackinsack,  Feb.  22d,  1 769. 

THE  Public  is  hereby  informed  that  the  Grammar 
School,  near  the  to-wn  of  Hackinsack  is  still  continued,  and 
that  a  large,  commodious  and  elegant  edifice  is  erected  for 
the  better  accommodation  of  the  scholars. 

The  place  is  in  all  respects  well  calculated  for  a  public 
school.  Boarding  is  as  cheap,  and  as  reasonable  as  can  be 
desired;  there  is  little  opportunity  of  contracting  vicious 
habits,  and  the  inhabitants  are  so  emulous  to  prevent  them, 
that  Peter  Zabriskie,  Esq;  &  other  residents  in  the  place, 
have  voluntarily  engaged  to  exert  themselves,  in  conjunc- 
tion with  the  teacher,  for  the  preservation  of  the  morals 
of  the  youth,  and  for  checking  the  first  symptoms  of  vice. 

Notwithstanding  the  malevolent  insinuations  that  have 
been  industriously  propagated  with  regard  to  the  method 
of  instruction  practiced  by  the  subscriber,  several  gentle- 
men both  of  abilities  and  figure,  have  expressed  their  high- 
est approbation,  both  of  the  method  of  tuition  and  prog- 
ress of  the  young  under  his  care :  nor  can  he,  by  carefully 
observing  the  methods  of  others,  find,  that  Ite  has  omitted 
^ny  thing  in  his  plan,  (since  he  has  had  the  liberty  of 
choosing  for  himself)  which  others  have  retained.  But 
as  he  has  not  the  talent  of  pushing  himself  into  fame,  he 
must  leave  the  proof  of  his  assiduity  and  diligence  to  the 
best  test,  experience. 

He  returns  his  most  hearty  thanks  to  those  who  have 
already  entrusted  him  with  the  education  of  their  children, 
and  hopes  by  his  care  and  pains  to  merit  the  continuance 
of  their  favours. 

Navigation,  the  Italian  method  of  book-keeping,  sur- 
veying and  other  branches  of  the  mathematics,  are  also 
taught,  at  reasonable  rates,  by 

The  public's  humble  servant, 

PETER  WILSON. 


382  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 


VIEW    OF 


HOUSE    AND 


TREES. 


To  BE  SOLD. 

A  Plantation  in  Middletown,  con- 
taining 200  acres,  more  or  less,  as 
may  best  suit  the  purchaser,  of  good 
kind  land,  bounded  on  two  brooks  of 
fine  running  water,  one  on  the  east 


side,  and  one  on  the  west  side;  about 
70  acres  clear  and  within  good  fence,  and  about  12  acres 
of  good  fresh  mowing  meadow,  and  as  much  more  may 
be  made  with  a  little  trouble;  there  is  a  plenty  of  good 
timber  and  York- wood;  there  is  on  it  a  tolerable  good 
house  and  an  orchard  of  about  100  large  apple-trees,  with 
some  peach-trees,  plumb  and  cherry-trees;  it  lies  about  a 
mile  and  half  from  the  bay  by  Chingarovis  point,  where  is 
plenty  of  fish,  oysters  and  clams,  and  about  a  mile  from 
a  grist-mill,  and  half  a  mile  from  a  saw-mill :  Whoever 
inclines  to  purchase  the  said  plantation,  let  them  apply  to 
James  Kearney;  who  lives  about  a  mile  and  a  half  from 
the  premises,  who  will  agree  on  reasonable  terms  and  will 
give  a  sufficient  title  for  the  same. — The  New  York  Jour- 
nal  or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1365,  March  2,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

SEVERAL  valuable  plantations,  lying  in  Bristol  township, 
viz.  One  lying  on  Delaware,  the  great  road  leading  from 
Philadelphia  to  Trenton,  running  through  the  same,  com- 
monly known  by  the  name  of  Cold  Spring,  containing  150 
acres  of  upland  and  meadow,  etc,  etc.  Likewise  a  tract  of 
land,  containing  40  acres,  lying  about  a  mile  from  the 
aforesaid  premises,  etc,  etc,  etc.;  also  one  plantation  or 
tract  of  land,  lying  in  the  Jerseys,  opposite  the  two  first, 
containing  50  acres,  some  part  cleared.  There  are  about 
20  acres  of  meadow  in  the  whole,  and  about  10  acres  more 
may  be  made.  An  indisputable  title  will  be  made  to  the 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  383 

purchaser  of  any  of  said  lands,  by  THOMAS  STANALAND, 
living  on  the  first  described  premises. 

WHEREAS  RICHARD  COLLINGS,  Gardener,  once  of  the 
Northern  Liberties,  for  some  Years  past  hath  not  followed 
raising  of  Garden  Seeds,  as  he  formerly  did,  by  Reason 
of  a  Removal  to  the  Jerseys,  and  not  having  his  Ground 
properly  cultivated  for  that  Business;  he  now  gives  pub- 
lic Notice,  That  for  these  last  Two  Years  he  has  taken 
Care  to  procure  an  Assortment  of  the  best  GARDEN  SEEDS, 
Pease  and  Beans  of  all  Sorts,  and  begs  the  Favour  of  his 
former  Customers  to  apply  to  him,  at  his  Stand,  at  the 
upper  End  of  the  Jersey  Market,  Philadelphia,  on  the 
North  Side,  where  they  shall  be  kindly  used. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Gazette,  No.  2097,  March  2,  1769. 

Captain  Allison  from  Lisbon,  the  2Oth  of  February,  in 
lat.  36.  long.  72.  spoke  the  schooner  Industry,  Captain 
Gardiner,  from  Cape  Nichola  for  Salem,  out  24  days,  who 
informed  him  that  the  Brig  Juno,  Captain  Wilson,  of  this 
port  was  arrived  there. 

Nassau-hall,  Princeton,  March  2. 

IN  terms  of  the  advertisement  formerly  published,  the 
Grammar  school  at  Princeton  was  begun  precisely  on  the 
7th  of  November  last.  The  numbers  considering  the 
shortness  of  the  time,  have  exceeded  expectation.  The 
design  of  this  present  notice  is  to  assure  the  public,  that 
according  to  my  promise  to  the  trustees,  I  have  undertaken 
the  conduct  of  it;  that  the  young  man  who  teaches  it  re- 
ceive his  whole  directions  from  me,  and  has  hitherto  given 
the  greatest  satisfaction  by  fidelity  and  diligence  in  the 
execution  of  them.  He  is  furnished  with  a  book  of  direc- 
tions for  masters  to  form  their  pupils  to  a  thorough  knowl- 
edge of  the  Latin  language,  drawn  up  by  one  who  was 


384  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

long  Rector  of  the  public  grammar  school  in  Glasgow,  the 
seat  of  one  of  the  universities  in  Scotland,  and  taught  it 
with  as  great  reputation  and  success  as  any  that  ever  ap- 
peared in  that  country.  He  is  furnished  with  a  book  of 
classic  maps,  to  point  out  the  places  spoken  of  in  any  au- 
thor the  scholar  may  happen  to  read,  and  it  is  particularly 
recommended  to  him  to  study  the  Roman  &  Greek  an- 
tiquities, that  he  may  be  able  to  explain  any  word  that 
refers  to  the  customs  and  manners  of  the  ancients  or  the 
constitutions  of  their  several  states.  He  is  also  furnished 
with  a  terrestrial  globe,  that  they  may  be  taught  Geog- 
raphy, by  occasional  exercises  for  amusement  rather  than 
a  task.  One  hour  every  day  is  spent  in  writing  and  arith- 
metick;  And  it  is  proposed  to  have  a  weekly  exercise  of 
reading  the  English  authors  with  propriety  and  grace,  with 
remarks  on  the  grammar  and  spelling  of  the  English 
tongue.  Every  Lord's  day  evening  since  the  school  began, 
the  scholars  have  been  convened,  and  instructed  in  the 
principles  of  religion.  This  is  done  for  the  sake  of  those 
whose  parents  live  at  a  distance,  and  will  be  carefully  con- 
tinued. On  the  whole  the  public  may  rest  assured  that  no 
pains  will  be  spared  to  make  the  instruction  at  this  school 
compleat  and  accurate;  and  indeed  they  have  a  pretty 
sure  pledge  of  our  fidelity,  because  the  scholars  who  enter 
college  from  this  school  must  be  a  sort  of  standard  for  the 
qualifications  of  those  who  are  to  be  admitted  from  other 
places.  It  would  be  a  terrible  reproach  to  offer  insufficient 
scholars  brought  up  within  our  own  walls,  and  it  is  ex- 
pected and  even  hoped  that  other  school  masters  will  by  a 
laudable  emulation  keep  us  hard  and  close  to  our  duty. 

J.  WITHERSPOON. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.   1369,  March  2, 
1769. 

New-York,  March  3.    The  following  melancholy  Acci- 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  385 

dent  happen'd  on  Sunday  the  I2th  of  February  last,  in  the 
South  Ward  of  the  City  of  Amboy,  Cranbury.  Between 
two  and  three  o' Clock  in  the  Afternoon,  a  Man  passing 
the  House  of  Mr.  Joseph  Rue,  of  that  Place,  perceived  a 
great  Smoak  issuing  from  some  Part  of  the  Roof,  near 
the  Kitchen  Chimney,  on  which  he  went  in,  in  order  to 
alarm  and  assist  the  Family.  He  found  little  or  no  Fire 
on  the  Hearth,  nor  was  the  Chimney  on  Fire  above,  yet 
the  Smoak  increased,  he  could  hear  the  Flames  roar,  and 
they  presently  burst  out  of  the  N.  W.  Corner  of  the  Roof; 
the  Wind  being  high  at  North  West,  which  drove  them 
full  upon  the  rest  of  the  Building,  the  whole  was  almost 
instantly  in  Flames.  Mr.  Rue  and  his  Wife  were  both 
abroad,  and  only  some  small  Children  at  home;  the  Fire 
spread  with  such  Rapidity  and  Fury,  that  only  a  few 
Neighbours  had  Time  to  assemble,  and  get  out  an  incon- 
siderable Quantity  of  the  Goods,  before  the  whole  Build- 
ing and  all  it  contained,  which  was  very  valuable,  were 
entirely  consumed. — Supplement  to  the  New  York  Jour- 
nal or  General  Advertiser,  No.  1365,  March  4,  1769. 

New-York,  March  6.  Capt.  Lowndes,  in  12  Days  from 
Santa  Croix,  acquaints  us,  That  Capt.  Spinning,  from 
Elizabeth-TowTn,  for  North-Carolina,  arrived  the  6th  of 
February,  having  2 1  Passengers,  were  reduced  to  4  Ounces 
of  Beef,  and  half  a  Pint  of  Water  in  the  24  Hours. 

WHEREAS  the  proprietors  of  Horseneck  purchase,  have 
agreed  to  divide  their  lands  lying  between  the  mountain 
and  Passaick  river :  Notice  is  hereby  given  to  all  persons 
that  have  any  right  in  said  purchase,  to  apply  to  Derick 
Mourrison,  at  Horseneck,  on  or  before  the  first  day  of 
June  next,  there  and  then,  to  comply  with  the  constitutions 
of  said  purchase,  or  else  expect  they  exclude  themselves 
by  refusing. 

25 


386  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

WHEREAS  Jabez  Ward,  of  the  Township  of  Newark, 
in  the  Province  of  New-Jersey,  has  some  Reason  to  think 
his  Wife  Margaret  Ward,  has  Intentions  of  running  him 
in  Debt,  to  his  Damage  or  Ruin.  This  is  therefore  to  for- 
bid and  forewarn  all  Persons  'whatsoever  from  trusting 
the  said  Margaret  Ward  on  his  Account,  for  he  will  pay 
no  Debts,  she  shall  contract  from  the  Date  hereof. 

March  6,  1769.  JABEZ  WARD 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1366,  March  6,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  VERY  valuable  plantation  or  tract  of  land,  situate  in 
the  county  of  Salem,  and  province  of  West-New-Jersey, 
near  the  town  of  Salem  aforesaid,  containing  about  600 
acres,  with  good  buildings,  orchards,  and  every  other 
thing  necessary  for  grazing  and  tilling.  For  particulars 
inquire  of  Samuel  Oakford,  on  the  premises,  Joseph  Hart, 
at  Port  Penn,  William  Hewlings,  Esq;  in  Burlington,  or 
John  Hart,  in  Philadelphia. 

N.  B.  Any  time,  not  exceeding  seven  years,  will  be 
given  for  the  payment  of  the  purchase-money,  paying  in- 
terest, and  giving  security  if  desired. 

To  be  sold  on  Wednesday,  the  4th  of  April  next,  at  public 
vendue,  on  the  premises,  or  at  any  time  before  at  private 
sale, 

A  HOUSE  and  LOT  of  GROUND,  in  Princeton;  the  house 
is  of  one  story,  and  almost  new,  and  has  four  rooms,  with 
a  kitchen  and  a  cellar  under  part  of  it ;  the  lot  consists  of 
about  half  an  acre,  and  has  a  well  sunk  in  it;  the  situation 
is  very  convenient  for  a  tradesman.  Good  Bonds  on  inter- 
est, with  proper  security,  will  be  as  acceptable  as  the  cash, 
and  an  indisputable  title  given  by 

WILLIAM  TENNANT. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  387 

To  be  SOLD  by  the  Subscriber, 

A  handsome  well  finished  brick  house,  two  stories  high, 
four  rooms  below  stairs,  besides  garrets ;  the  rooms  above 
and  below  stairs  are  genteely  papered,  a  large  dry  cellar 
under  the  whole  house,  properly  divided;  a  convenient 
kitchen  adjoining,  with  chambers  above  for  servants,  sit- 
uate in  King-street,  in  Trenton;  the  lot  contains  about 
three  quarters  of  an  acre,  and  extends  through  to  Queen- 
street,  on  which  stand  the  stables.  Also  several  five  acres 
lots  of  meadows,  orchard  and  pasture  lands,  each  good 
of  their  kind,  near  and  convenient  to  the  town;  as  also  a 
good  house,  and  new  large  framed  barn,  with  17  acres  of 
excellent  land,  eight  acres  of  which  is  garden,  meadow, 
and  an  orchard  of  the  best  grafted  fruit;  the  remaining 
nine  acres  good  woodland;  its  situation  renders  it  conve- 
nient for  a  shop-keeper,  tradesman,  &c.  being  situated  in 
Trenton  also.  The  purchaser  may  have  any  of  the  above, 
on  very  moderate  terms,  and  reasonable  credit  given,  pay- 
ing interest.  WILLIAM  PIDGEON. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  113,  March  6- 
13,  1769. 

PURSUANT  to  an  order  of  the  honourable  Charles  Read, 
and  John  Berrien,  Judges  of  the  supreme  court  of  judica- 
ture for  the  province  of  New-Jersey:  Notice  is  hereby 
given  to  the  respective  creditors  of  John  M'Kinsie,  an  in- 
solvent debtor,  in  the  gaol  of  the  county  of  Morris,  that 
they  be,  and  appear,  on  Wednesday  the  fifth  day  of  April 
next,  at  nine  o'clock  in  the  morning,  at  the  court  house  in 
Perth-Amboy,  in  the  county  of  Middlesex,  to  shew  cause 
(if  any  they  have)  why  the  said  John  M'Kinsie,  should 
not  be  discharged,  agreeable  to  a  late  act  of  the  legisla- 
ture of  the  said  province,  for  the  relief  of  insolvent  debt- 
ors. 


388  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Morris  Town,  Feb.  12,  1769. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1366,  March  9,  1769. 

PHILADELPHIA,  March  g. 

Captain  Ayres, — from  Lisbon,  last  Friday  Afternoon, 
about  10  Leagues  from  our  Capes, — spoke  the  Captains 
Lockton,  Tillet  and  Curry,  from  this  Port,  and  Captain 
Walker  from  Wilmington,  who  had  all  left  the  Capes  that 
same  Day. 

Sussex  County,  New-Jersey,  February  24,  1769. 
NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  to  whom  it  may  concern,  That 
two  of  the  Judges  of  the  inferior  Court  of  Common  Pleas, 
for  the  County  of  Sussex,  have  appointed  Friday,  the  3ist 
Day  of  March  next,  to  meet,  at  the  House  of  David  Rey- 
nolds, Innholder,  at  Racket's  Town,  in  order  to  discharge 
John  Wolfel  Litzel,  and  David  Penwell,  insolvent  Debt- 
ors, agreeable  to  the  late  Act  of  Assembly,  made  and  pro- 
vided in  that  Case. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  on  the  loth  day 
of  April  next,  on  the  premises, 

A  VALUABLE  plantation  and  tract  of  land,  containing 
about  97  acres,  situate  in  Chester  township,  Burlington 
county,  fronting  the  river  Delaware,  at  a  place  called  Sen- 
emenson,1  about  9  miles  from  Cooper's  ferry,  by  land,  and 
about  the  same  distance  from  Philadelphia  by  water ;  there 
is  a  share  of  a  good  shad  fishery  belonging  to  the  premises, 
a  good  apple  orchard,  and  other  fruit  trees,  about  12  acres 
of  drained  meadow,  supposed  to  be  as  good  as  any  in  said 
county,  most  part  of  which  is  cleared,  and  under  good 
grass,  and  is  well  secured  from  the  tide  by  a  good  dam  and 
flood-gates;  there  is  on  said  premises,  a  log  house,  with 

i  Usually  written  Cinnaminson. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  389 

two  rooms  on  a  floor,  a  spring-house  and  sundry  other  con- 
venient buildings.  The  land  is  exceeding  fertile  for  rais- 
ing market  truck;  late  the  property  of  William  Cox,  de- 
ceased. Any  person  who  has  a  mind  to  view  the  premises 
before  the  day  of  sale,  may  apply  to  John  Cox,  in  Moore's- 
town,  or  the  subscriber,  living  on  the  premises.  The  con- 
ditions will  be  made  known  at  the  time  and  place  afore- 
said, when  attendance  will  be  given,  by 

SARAH  Cox,  Executrix. 

To  be  SOLD  by  the  subscriber,  living  in  Reading-Town, 
Hunterdon  county,  West  New-Jersey,  the  following  tracts 
of  land,  viz. 

The  noted  and  valuable  PLANTATION,  whereon  he  now 
lives,  containing  335  acres,  of  which  250  acres  are  cleared, 
and  a  sufficient  quantity  of  meadow,  the  remainder  being 
well  timbered,  and  the  whole  well  watered,  being  pleas- 
antly situated  on  the  South  Branch  of  Rariton  River,  with 
a  large  brick  mansion  house,  4  rooms  on  a  floor,  a  good 
frame  kitchen  adjoining,  and  a  cellar  under  the  whole;  a 
good  large  Dutch  barn,  with  other  necessary  out  houses 
belonging  thereto,  and  a  large  bearing  orchard  of  the  best 
grafted  fruit.  Also  one  other  very  valuable  large  tract  of 
land,  in  Sussex  county,  West  New- Jersey,  within  three 
miles  of  Squire's  Point  Forge,  containing  1000  acres,  of 
which  there  are  100  acres  of  choice  good  meadow  cleared, 
and  a  sufficient  quantity  of  plough  land,  a  dwelling-house, 
a  good  new  large  Dutch  barn,  and  several  barracks,  with 
a  very  good  bearing  orchard  of  the  best  grafted  fruits,  &c. 
the  above  being  well  watered  and  timbered.  Also  one 
other  tract  of  land  in  Newtown,  Sussex  county,  bounded 
by  the  foot  of  the  Blue  Mountain,  where  the  main  road 
crosses  said  Mountain,  within  4  or  5  miles  of  Sussex 
Court-house,  containing  43 1  acres,  whereon  are  two  small 


39°  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

improvements.  Also  one  other  tract  of  land,  bounded  by 
lands  commonly  called  Reading's  Bottom,  near  Sussex 
Court-house,  containing  200  acres.  Also  one  other  tract, 
lying  at  the  Head  of  Alamuchey,  near  Andover  iron  works, 
in  Sussex  county,  containing  137  acres.  Also  one  other 
tract  of  land,  bounded  by  George  Beaty,  in  Sussex,  con- 
taining 214  acres.  Also  three  other  small  tracts  lying  be- 
tween Squire's  Point  Forge  and  George  Beaty's  mill,  be- 
ing extraordinary  good  wood  land,  one  containing  100 
acres,  one  72  acres,  and  the  other  52  acres.  Also  one  other 
tract  of  land,  situate  in  Mansfield  Wood-house  township, 
near  Pahatkunk,  containing  341  acres.  Also  one  other 
tract  of  land,  in  Morris  county,  near  Racket's  Town,  con- 
taining 218  acres,  with  a  small  improvement  thereon.  Also 
one  other  tract  of  land,  in  Morris  county,  near  George 
Beaty's  mill,  containing  182  acres.  Any  person  or  persons 
inclining  to  purchase  any  of  the  aforesaid  lands,  may  apply 
to  William  Norcross,  sq;  or  Mr.  John  Gregg,  both  of  Am- 
well,  or  to  the  subscriber,  who  will  sell  any  of  them  un- 
commonly cheap,  and  an  indisputable  title  given.  He  has 
also  for  sale,  a  number  of  Negroe  men,  women  and  chil- 
dren, who  have  had  the  small-pox,  and  are  capable  of  doing 
all  kinds  of  country  business. 

MARTIN  RYERSON. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  That  I  the  Subscriber,  intend 
to  present  a  Petition  to  the  Assembly  of  the  Province  of 
New-Jersey,  at  their  next  Sitting,  in  order  to  obtain  a  Law 
for  the  Owners  and  Possessors  of  the  Meadows,  on  Little 
Timber  Creek,  in  the  County  of  Gloucester,  to  contribute 
towards  the  Expence  of  keeping  up  and  maintaining  the 
Dam,  Bank  and  Water-works,  in  Proportion  to  their 
Meadow,  from  the  Hill  on  the  Masters's  Plantation  to 
the  Plantation  belonging  to  the  Heirs  of  Joseph  Harrison, 
deceased,  at  the  Mouth  of  said  Creek;  if  any  Person  or 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  39 1 

Persons  have  any  Objections,  they  are  desired  to  appear, 
and  make  the  same  known. 

WILLIAM  GERRARD. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2098,  March  9, 
1769. 

To  be  sold,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  on  the  2Oth  day  of 

April  next  on  the  premises, 

A  VALUABLE  plantation  and  tract  of  land,  containing 
about  190  acres,  situate  on  Penshaukin  creek,  in  the  town- 
ship of  Chester,  in  the  county  of  Burlington;  late  the 
property  of  John  Chambers,  deceased.  There  are  on  said 
premises  a  dwelling  house,  with  two  rooms  on  a  floor,  and 
two  good  apple  orchards,  about  30  acres  of  drained  mead- 
ow, 80  acres  of  cleared  land  within  fence,  the  remainder 
is  woodland.  The  title  is  indisputable.  The  conditions 
of  sale  will  be  made  known  at  the  time  and  place  aforesaid, 
where  attendance  will  be  given  by 

ANN  JONES,  Executrix. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  LOT  of  GROUND,  on  the  north  side  of  Sassafras  (or 
Race)  Street,  between  Second  and  Third  Streets,  in  Phil- 
adelphia; containing  in  breadth  fifty- four  feet,  and  in 
depth  one  hundred  and  fourteen  feet,  to  a  twelve  feet  alley 

leading  into  Second-street. Also  a  piece  of  land  situate 

beyond  the  third  mile  stone  on  Frankford  Road,  in  the 
Northern  Liberties,  containing  twenty-two  acres  and  a 
half  whereof  a  small  part  is  meadow,  on  which  is  a  small 
tenement  and  an  orchard  of  grafted  fruit  trees;  now  in 
the  tenure  of  Daniel  Kuhlman. For  further  particu- 
lars, apply  to  Peter  Worral,  in  Burlington. 

THREE  POUNDS  REWARD. 
RAN  away,  last  night,  from  the  subscriber,  living  in 


392  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

Chesterfield  township,  West-New-Jersey,  an  Irish  Servant 
Lad,  named  Hugh  M'Carty,  about  ip  years  of  age,  five 
feet  eight  or  nine  inches  high,  of  a  fair  complexion,  and 
wears  his  own  brown  hair.  Had  on  and  took  with  him, 
a  coat  of  white  homespun  bearskin,  and  a  white  broadcloth 
jacket,  both  with  wooden  buttons,  buckskin  breeches,  half- 
zvorn  yarn  stockings,  old  shoes,  with  large  brass  buckles 
in  them,  and  a  new  felt  hat;  also  a  broadcloth  homespun 
brown  coat,  and  nankeen  jacket  and  breeches.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  secures  the  above  described  servant,  so  as  his 
master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have  the  above  reward, 
and  all  reasonable  charges  paid  by  me 

THOMAS  THORN. 

N.  B.  The  above  servant  was  seen  ivith  a  certain  Sam- 
uel King,  last  Sunday,  and  it  is  thought  he  came  with  him 
to  this  city.  All  masters  of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him 
off  at  their  peril. — -The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  114, 
March  13-20,  1769. 


FIGURE 


TRUE  BRITON, 

Covers  this  Season,  at  Capt.  Heard's, 
at  Woodbridge,  New-Jersey,  at  4!. 
Proc.  the  Season;  and  as  the  collect- 
ing the  Money  last  Season  was  attend- 
HORSE.  ed  with  much  Trouble  and  Difficulty, 

the  Cash  must  be  paid  down  before  the 
Mares  are  taken  away.    Good  Grass  for  Mares. 

To  be  LET, 

A  House  and  lot  on  Cowfoot  Hill,  in  which  Capt.  Jo- 
seph Rose  now  lives,  opposite  Mr.  Philip  Kissick's.  For 
further  particulars,  enquire  of  Mr.  Kelly,  in  Wall-Street. 

A  house  and  lot,  the  most  pleasantly  situated  of  any  in 
Elizabeth-Town.  For  further  particulars  enquire  there 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  393 

of  Elias  Boudinott,  Esq;  or  Mr.  Kelly,  the  owner,  in  New- 
York. 

To  be  LET,  in  farms  from  50  to  300  acres,  on  very  low 
rent,  a  large  tract  of  fine  up-land  and  meadow,  nearly  in 
the  center  of  the  county  of  Sussex,  in  New- Jersey,  and 
about  half  a  mile  from  the  court-house  and  county  town; 
there  are  already  about  thirty  families  settled  on  it,  and  as 
many  more  may  be  accommodated  with  good  farms.  It 
is  well  known  to  be  one  of  the  best  places  in  that  province 
for  raising  stock  of  all  sorts;  and  on  account  of  the  great 
number  of  people  employ'd  at  the  iron-works  in  the  neigh- 
bourhood, there  is  generally  a  better  market  for  grain  and 
other  produce  than  at  New- York,  or  Philadelphia.  For 
the  terms,  and  further  particulars,  enquire  of  Thomas  An- 
derson, Esq;  near  the  premises,  who  is  impower'd  to  rent 
any  part  thereof  that  may  be  wanted,  or  of  William  Kelly, 
the  owner,  in  New- York. 

To  be  SOLD,  or  LET,  a  very  good  farm  of  between  4 
and  500  acres,  at  Canoe  Brook,  late  the  property  of  Henry 
Leonard,  Esq ;  deceased.  For  further  particulars,  enquire 
of  David  Ogden,  Esq;  at  Newark,  Mr.  Thomas  Millidge, 
in  Morris  County,  or  William  Kelly,  the  owner,  in  New- 
York. 

To  be  SOLD,  a  very  valuable  farm  now  in  the  posses- 
sion of  Lemuel  Bowers,  Esq;  in  Morris  County,  contain- 
ing about  1 60  acres,  of  which  40  acres  is  fine  English 
meadow,  and  20  more  may  be  made;  the  remainder  is 
good  upland  fit  to  produce  wheat  and  other  grain.  There 
is  on  it  a  new  two  story  house,  with  brick  chimnies,  and 
sash'd  windows,  a  kitchen,  barn,  and  a  store  house,  under 
which  there  is  a  cellar.  For  further  particulars,  enquire 
of  David" Ogden,  Esq;  at  Newark,  Mr.  Kelly,  in  New- 
York,  or  Mr.  Bowers,  on  the  premises. 


394  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

To  be  sold  at  private  Sale,  in  the  Township  of  Bedmin- 
ster,  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  and  Province  of  East- 
New-Jersey  ; 

A  Lot  of  land,  about  one  acre,  whereon  is  two  dwelling- 
houses,  one  of  which  is  occupied  by  a  tavern  keeper,  and 
has  been  for  several  years  past,  is  a  large  house  with  5  fire- 
places, and  is  well  situated  for  public  business,  and  is  about 
15  miles  from  Brunswick  Landing.  Also  to  be  sold  to- 
gether with  said  lot,  or  separate,  as  may  best  suit  the  pur- 
chaser, loo  acres  or  more,  of  very  good  land,  whereon  is 
a  good  dwelling  house  and  barn.  Chief  of  said  land  is 
cleared,  with  about  eight  or  ten  acres  of  meadow  cleared; 
all  of  which  is  in  good  repair.  Any  person  inclining  to 
purchase  the  whole,  or  only  said  house  and  lot,  may  hear 
of  good  encouragement  by  applying  to  the  subscriber,  liv- 
ing at  Pluckemin,  near  said  premises. 

JACOB  EOFF,  Senior. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
907,  March  13,  1769. 

To  be  SOLD,  at  public  vendue  on  Monday  the  $d  of  April 

next, 

A  HOUSE  and  lot  lying  in  the  city  of  Perth-Amboy, 
belonging  to  the  estate  of  Richard  Fits  Randolph,  late  of 
said  city,  deceased;  said  lot  is  on  the  south  side  of  Srnith- 
Street,  near  entering  into  the  city  out  of  the  country,  and 
is  90  feet  front  and  rear,  and  66  feet  on  each  side,  with  a 
good  dwelling  house  two  story  high,  two  fire  places  in 
each  story,  a  cellar  under  it,  a  kitchen  joining,  and  other 
out  houses,  with  a  good  well,  now  in  the  occupation  of 
Gilbert  Shearer:  Also  one  other  lot  joining  on  the  east 
side  of  the  aforesaid  lot,  43  feet  front  and  rear,  and  66 
feet  on  each  side,  with  a  dwelling  house  on  it,  with  two 
fire  places  one  above  and  one  below :  Also  a  lot  lying 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  395 

on  the  very  point  of  said  city,  commonly  called  Coles 
Point,  fronting  both  Raritan  river  and  the  Sound.  Said 
vendue  to  begin  at  ten  o'clock  of  said  day,  and  held  on  or 
near  the  premises.  For  further  particulars,  enquire  of 
Nathaniel  Fitz  Randolph,  blacksmith,  living  in  Wood- 
bridge  town. 

Woodbridge  March  8,  1769. 

RuN-Away  in  the  night  of  the  3Oth  of  September  last, 
from  the  subscriber,  living  in  Mount-Holy,  West  New- 
Jersey,  an  Irish  servant  man,  named  John  O'Bryan,  aged 
about  35  years,  about  5  feet  6  inches  high;  mark'd  with 
the  small  pox,  speaks  pretty  good  English,  with  a  little  of 
the  brogue;  is  a  shoe-maker  by  trade,  and  can  work  plan- 
tation work;  has  short  dark  curl'd  hair;  had  on,  and  took 
with  him  when  he  went  away,  a  felt  hat,  two  new  ozne- 
burghs  shirts,  and  two  pair  of  trowsers  of  the  same, 
a  pair  of  new  striped  ticken  trowsers,  and  an  old  striped 
shirt,  good  shoes,  with  brass  buckles,  and  a  pair  of  let- 
tis  made  silver  buckles,  a  fine  ruffled  shirt,  mark'd  with 
I.M.  under  the  arm,  a  large  silk  handkerchief,  black  and 
yellow  mixt,  a  thick  cloth  jacket  light  colour'd,  lined  with 
woolen,  made  sailor  fashion,  a  pair  of  broad  cloth  breech- 
es, blue  and  red  mixed,  a  pale  blue  cloth  jacket,  that  had 
been  turned,  the  body  lined  with  check  linnen,  with  yel- 
low metal  buttons,  and  a  pair  of  old  leather  breeches,  and 
a  leather  jacket,  lined  with  woolen,  and  had  a  roundish 
piece  set  in  the  shoulder  of  the  jacket,  and  a  bearskin  sur- 
tout  coat,  of  a  light  brown  colour,  with  a  shalloon  cap  in 
the  cape,  with  mohair  buttons,  two  pair  of  women's 
gloves,  one  of  which  was  silk,  a  pair  of  mallrings  and  sev- 
eral iron  wedges,  and  a  hatchet  and  two  new  twild  bags; 
he  also  stole  his  master's  horse,  bridle  and  saddle,  which 
horse  he  swapped  away  near  Sussex  court  house,  in  the 
Jerseys,  about  the  5th  of  October,  with  one  William 


39^  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

M'Coy,  for  a  bay  horse,  and  there  had  changed  his  name 
to  John  Moore,  and  enquired  the  way  to  Albany,  where 
he  told  M'Coy  he  had  a  wife,  and  had  a  piece  of  copper  ore 
with  him,  which  he  was  fond  of  shewing,  and  could  talk 
Indian,  and  as  I  have  since  been  informed,  has  been  over 
most  parts  of  the  country,  altho'  he  told  me  he  had  but  just 
come  from  Ireland,  and  was  sold  to  me  by  one  John  Har- 
kins,  of  Philadelphia;  The  same  servant  has  been  adver- 
tised in  the  Philadelphia  gazette,  several  times,  and  in  250 
single  advertisements.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  the 
above  servant,  in  any  goal  in  New-Jersey,  or  brings  him  to 
his  said  master,  shall  receive  a  reward  of  Six  POUNDS, 
proclamation  money, 

paid  by  JOHN  MONROW 

— The  Nczv  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1367,  March  13,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  LOT  of  Land  pleasantly  situated,  in  Shrewsbury,  in 
the  County  of  Monmouth,  containing  35  acres  on  which 
is  a  very  good  orchard,  and  five  acres  of  good  meadow, 
also  about  two  acres  of  wood  land,  (the  remainder  very 
good  for  all  sorts  of  grain  and  pasturing)  all  in  very  good 
fence.  There  is  on  the  said  lot  a  very  good  dwelling  house 
almost  new,  has  two  rooms  with  a  shop  and  three  fire 
places  on  the  first  floor,  and  two  rooms  on  the  next,  fin- 
ished, and  more  unfinished;  there  is  a  good  kitchen  ad- 
joining the  house,  a  very  good  barn  with  three  good  stables 
in  it,  a  store  house  and  a  smoak  house :  before  the  door  is 
a  good  well  and  a  garden  pail'd  off.  The  whole  very  con- 
venient for  a  gentleman's  country  seat,  a  tradesman,  tav- 
ern-keeper, or  for  a  merchant  (that  business  having  been 
carried  on  there,  for  several  years  past)  it  being  near  to  a 
mill,  and  but  4^  miles  from  a  landing,  from  whence  there 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  397 

may  be  a  ready  conveyance  to  New- York  market ;  and  it 
is  about  2\  miles  from  Shrewsburry  town,  where  there  is 
plenty  of  fowl,  fish,  oysters,  clams  &c  to  be  had  in  the  sea- 
son :  Any  person  inclining  to  purchase  the  same,  may 
apply  to  Peter  Voorheis  on  the  premises,  or  Henry  Van 
Vleck,  merchant,  in  Dock-Street,  New- York,  who  will 
agree  for  the  same  on  reasonable  terms. 

To  BE  SOLD 

A  TRACT  of  salt  meadow  and  Cedar  swamp,  situate, 
lying  and  being  on  new  Barbados-Neck,  in  Bergen  county 
in  New- Jersey,  containing  about  114  acres  of  salt  meadow, 
and  about  322  acres  of  cedar  swamp;  the  whole  is  bound- 
ed on  the  two  sides  by  Stagg's  Creek,  commonly  called 
Berry's  Creek,  and  by  Peach-Island  Creek,  the  meadows 
are  reckoned,  by  those  in  the  neighbourhood,  who  have 
frequently  mowed  in  them,  not  inferior  to  any  salt  meadow 
in  that  part  of  the  country,  and  some  parts  thereof  at  a 
very  small  expence  may  be  made  fresh  meadow  and  to 
yield  good  English  grass;  the  timber  and  wood  of  every 
kind  in  the  cedar  swamp  is  now  in  great  perfection,  as  the 
present  owner  has  preserved  it,  and  prevented  any  of  the 
wood  being  cut  out  for  near  upon  thirty  years,  the  con- 
veniences of  loadings  and  easy  carriage  from  the  said 
cedar  swamp  are  no  way  inferior  to  those  of  any  other 
swamp  on  that  neck,  as  a  great  part  of  the  swamp  is 
bounded  by  Berry's  Creek,  and  common  sloops  and  wood 
boats  can  go  up  that  creek  to  be  loaded,  and  from  the 
other  side  of  the  tract,  the  timber  may  be  brought  to  Hack- 
ensack  River,  by  sledding  or  carting  it  one  quarter  of  a 
mile.  A  plan  or  draught  of  the  said  meadows  and  swamp, 
made  from  a  late  survey,  may  be  seen  by  applying  to  Mr. 
John  Terhune,  at  Hackensack,  or  to  the  subscriber  in 
New-York. 


398  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

Whereas  the  above  premises  were  advertised  and  in- 
tended for  sale  the  third  of  October,  but  as  the  swamp 
could  better  be  viewed  in  winter  when  froze,  it  was 
thought  best  to  postpone  the  sale  to  May,  that  any  person 
inclining  to  purchase  might  in  the  winter  view  said  swamp 
and  see  what  he  purchased. 

Now  the  above  mentioned  premises  are  preemptorly  to 
be  sold  on  Tuesday  the  i6th  day  of  May  next,  at  publick 
sale  to  the  highest  bidder,  at  the  Court-house  in  Bergen 
County,  in  the  town  of  Hackensack;  for  the  greater  con- 
veniency  of  purchasers,  the  meadows  will  be  sold  in  five 
lots,  and  the  cedar  swamp  in  eight  lots,  according  to  the 
above  survey,  each  lot  of  the  meadow  contains  about  40 
acres.  A  good  title  will  be  given  to  the  purchaser  or  pur- 
chasers by  NICHOLAS  ROOSEVELT 
— The  ATeu>  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1367,  March  16,  1769. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  VERY  valuable  plantation,  or  tract  of  land,  situate  in 
the  county  of  Salem,  and  province  of  West  New-Jersey, 
near  the  town  of  Salem  aforesaid,  containing  about  600 
acres,  with  good  buildings,  orchards,  and  every  other 
thing  necessary  for  grazing  and  tilling.  For  further  par- 
ticulars enquire  of  SAMUEL  OAKFORD,  on  the  premises; 
JOSEPH  HART,  at  Port  Penn;  WILLIAM  HEWLINGS,  Esq; 
in  Burlington;  or  JOHN  HART,  in  Philadelphia. 

N.  B.  Any  time,  not  exceeding  seven  years,  will  be 
given  for  the  payment  of  the  purchase  Money,  paying  in- 
terest, and  giving  security,  if  required. — The  Pennsylva- 
nia Gazette,  No.  2099,  March  16,  1769. 

PRINCETON,  March  9.  Friday  about  three  of  the  clock 
in  the  afternoon,  a  fire  broke  out  in  Nassau  Hall,  but  by 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  399 

the  immediate  and  vigorous  assistance  of  the  students,  and 
inhabitants  of  the  village,  it  was  extinguished  without  do- 
ing any  considerable  damage.  It  did  not  appear  to  have 
been  owing  to  the  heedlessness  of  any  person  whatever; 
but  probably  to  a  spark,  from  the  windward,  dropping  on 
the  leeward  side  of  the  building,  as  it  kindled  in  the  roof 
where  there  was  no  communication  with  any  of  the  cham- 
bers. 

PROPOSALS 

For  printing  by  Subscription,  in  Two  Volumes,  Octavo, 
SERMONS, 

ON 

Useful  and  Important  SUBJECTS, 

By  the  Rev.  SAMUEL  DAVIES,  A.  M. 

Late  President  of  the  College  in  Princeton,  New  Jersey. 

SUBSCRIBERS  are  desired  to  send  in  their  names  to 
either  of  the  following  persons,  The  Rev.  Doctor  John 
Witherspoon,  in  Princeton.  The  Rev.  Alexander  Me. 
Whorter,  in  New- Ark,  New- Jersey.  The  Rev.  John  Rod- 
gers,  the  Rev.  Joseph  Treat,  Mr.  Garret  Noel,  Bookseller, 
in  New- York.  The  Rev.  Samuel  Blair,  in  Boston.  The 
Rev.  Mr.  Sprout,  Messrs.  Hall  and  Sellers,  Messrs.  Will- 
iam and  Thomas  Bradford,  Printers,  Daniel  Roberdeau, 
Merchant,  in  Philadelphia.  The  Rev.  Robert  Smith,  in 
Pequea.  The  Rev.  George  Duffield,  in  Carlisle.  The  Rev. 
Elihu  Spencer,  in  St.  Georges.  The  Rev.  Jacob  Ker,  in 
Somerset-county,  Maryland.  Mr.  William  Holt,  Mer- 
chant, in  Williamsburg,  Virginia.  Captain  Craighead,  in 
New-Castle  ,  Hanover-county,  Virginia.  Mr.  David 
Smith,  in  West-Nottingham.  And  Mr.  Josiah  Smith,  in 
Charles-Town,  South-Carolina. 

CONDITIONS. 
I.     THE  Volumes,  each  containing  four  hundred  pages, 

to  be  printed  on  a  good  paper,  and  a  neat  type. 


400  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

II.  The  price  to  subscribers  to  be  each  volume  a  Spanish 
milled  Dollar.  Half  of  the  price  to  be  paid  at  the  time 
of  subscribing,  and  half  at  the  delivery  of  the  volumes, 
served  in  blue  covers.  Such  as  subscribe  for  six  sets  to 
be  entitled  to  a  seventh  set  gratis. 

WHEREAS  the  subscriber  living  in  Amwell,  Hunterdon 
county,  and  the  province  of  New-  Jersey,  executed  a  bond 
the  first  day  of  May,  1  768,  to  John  Corwine,  of  the  same 
place  for  the  sum  of  forty  five  pounds,  and  whereas  the 
said  Corwine  was  according  to  bargain  to  clear  a  right  of 
dowry,  and  has  not  complied,  this  is  therefore  to  forewarn 
all  persons  from  taking  an  assignment  of  said  bond,  as  the 
subscriber  is  determined  not  to  pay  it.  As  witness  my 
hand  this  24th  day  of  February,  1769. 

JOHN  MARTS. 

—  The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1371,  March   16, 
1769. 

At  a  Court  held  at  Salem,  in  New-Jersey,  a  few  Weeks 
ago,  a  Negro  Fellow  was  tried  and  convicted  for  a  Rape 
on  an  Idiot  Girl,  of  about  13  Years  old.  He  is  to  be  exe- 
puted  on  the  29th  Instant. 

On  the  1  4th  Inst.  the  House  of  one  Spenser  in  Salem 
County  was  consumed  by  Fire,  and  two  of  his  Sons  (one 
about  six  and  the  other  eight  Years  old)  unhappily  lost 
their  Lives  in  the  Flames;  it  being  out  of  the  Power  of 
their  distressed  Friends  to  save  them.  About  a  Week 
before,  the  House  of  one  Cox,  in  the  same  County,  was 
burnt  to  the  Ground,  and  one  of  his  Children,  a  Son,  also 
perished  in  the  Flames.  —  The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle, 
No.  115,  March  20-27, 


New-  York,  March  20.     Tuesday  last  was  married  at 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4O1 

Elizabeth-Town,  in  New-Jersey,  Col.  TEMPLER  of  the 
26th  Regiment,  to  Lady  SINCLAIR,  Relict  of  Sir  JOHN 
SINCLAIR,  Bart. 

And  the  Thursday  following  Mr.  JAMES  RIVINGTON, 
of  this  City,  Bookseller,  was  married  to  the  Widow  ELIZ- 
ABETH VAN  HORNE,  Relict  of  Mr.  Cornelius  Van  Home. 

A  Good  Bargain  to  be  got.  John  Scott,  of  Hanover 
Town,  Morris  County,  New-Jersey,  being  of  late  so  much 
afflicted  with  the  Rheumatism,  that  he  is  not  able  to  attend 
his  Slaves  on  the  Farm  as  usual,  purposes  to  rent  it  out 
for  seven  Years  from  April  1769.  To  set  forth  the  Qual- 
ities of  said  Farm  is  needless,  as  it  is  well  known  to  be 
equal  to  any  in  said  County  for  raising  Stock  or  Hay,  and 
much  good  Land  may  be  cleared  for  Grain ;  and  the  Wood 
on  said  Land  will  pay  for  the  clearing.  If  the  Tenant 
wants  it,  he  may  have  three  good  Slaves,  viz.  Two  Men 
and  a  Wench,  together  with  waggons,  carts,  ploughs,  har- 
rows, and  every  other  farming  Litensil;  as  also  Horses, 
Cows,  Oxen,  &c,  on  Rent,  or  Sale.  Whoever  inclines  to 
rent  the  same,  may  apply  to  said  Scott,  on  the  Premises, 
who  will  treat  with  them  on  reasonable  Terms.— The  New 
York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  908,  March  20, 
1769. 

To  be  SOLD, 

A  Plantation  of  very  good  Land,  situated  in  Somerset 
County,  and  Province  of  New-Jersey,  in  the  Forks  of 
Lomarton,  containing  376  Acres  of  very  good  Land,  ten 
Acres  whereof  is  excellent  Meadow,  (and  more  may  be 
made)  and  80  Acres  very  good  Wood  Land.  There  are 
on  said  Plantation,  a  large  Store  House,  a  large  Dutch 
Barn,  and  a  good  Orchard,  containing  200  Apple  Trees; 
the  Buildings  and  Improvements  all  in  good  Repair  and 
Order;  said  Plantation  lies  about  15  Miles  above  Rariton 

26 


402  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

Landing,  within  three  Quarters  of  a  Mile  of  the  Mills  for- 
merly belonging  to  Mr.  Andrew  Leake,  and  within  two 
Miles  of  the  Mills  of  Mr.  John  Davis :  Any  Person  in- 
clining to  purchase  the  same,  may  apply  to  the  Subscriber, 
living  on  the  Premises,  who  can  give  an  indisputable  Title 
for  the  same. 

PETER  POOST. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1368,  March  23,  1769. 

RUN  away  from  the  SUBSCRIBER,  living  in  Trenton, 
West  New- Jersey,  on  the  i8th  day  of  March,  an  Irish  ser- 
vant lad,  named  MICHAEL  BRADY,  about  19  years  of  age, 
about  5  feet  4  inches  high,  well  set,  very  thick  legs,  and 
knock  kneed,  fair  complexion,  full  grey  eyes,  and  lightish 
short  hair;  had  on,  and  took  with  him,  a  brown  thickset 
fustian  coat  and  breeches,  and  a  green  cloth  jacket,  with 
flat  metal  buttons  on  them,  a  pair  of  blue  stocking  breech- 
es, one  linen  jacket,  with  red  stripes,  and  white  and  ozen- 
brigs  shirt,  coarse  grey  yarn  stockings,  new  pumps,  with 
long  quarters,  with  metal  buckles  in  them,  and  coarse  felt 
hat.  He  is  a  shoemaker  by  trade,  and  pretends  to  the 
stuff-work.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said  servant  in 
any  of  his  Majesty's  goals,  so  that  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  have  THREE  POUNDS  reward,  and  reason- 
able charges,  paid  by 

WILLIAM  TUCKER. 

N.  B.  He  may  very  probably  change  his  name  and 
clothes,  as  he  is  a  crafty  fellow. 

Alloway's  Creek  Township,  Salem  County, 

March  3,  1769. 

LEFT  in  the  custody  of  the  Subscriber,  some  time  in 
June  last,  a  dark  brown  HORSE,  about  12  or  13  hands  high, 
5  or  6  years  old,  without  brand  or  ear-mark,  with  a  star 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4°3 

in  his  forehead,  paces,  trots  and  gallops,  short  bob  tail, 
most  of  his  mane  hangs  to  the  off  side;  the  person  that 
brought  him  calls  himself  Thomas  Powell,  and  says  he  got 
him  of  a  young  man,  an  acquaintance  of  his,  a  ship  car- 
penter, at  a  place  called  The  Trap,  in  New  Castle  county, 
and  that  he  Powell,  was  to  leave  the  said  horse  at  the 
young  man's  father's,  in  some  part  of  the  Jersey's;  but 
since  Powell  has  absconded,  and  being  apprehensive  that 
the  said  horse  might  have  been  stolen,  this  is  to  inform 
the  owner,  if  any,  to  come  and  prove  his  property,  and 
take  him  away,  otherwise  he  will  be  sold  in  six  weeks  from 
this  date,  to  pay  charges,  by  me 

LEWIS  OWEN. 

N.  B.     Said  Powell  brought,  with  said  horse,  a  good 
saddle  and  bridle. 

Pilesgrove,  Salem  County,  March  13,  1769. 
To  be  sold,  by  way  of  public  vendue,  on  the  i8th  day  of 
April,  at  12  o'clock,  on  the  premises,  A  plantation,  situate 
in  the  township  of  Pilesgrove,  containing  150  acres  of 
good  wheat  land,  100  acres  of  the  same  cleared,  and  in 
good  fence,  10  acres  of  good  meadow,  and  20  acres  of 
good  ash  swamp,  within  25  miles  of  the  city  of  Philadel- 
phia, lying  on  the  stage  road  from  Cooper's  ferry  to  Cum- 
berland county;  there  is  on  said  premises,  a  good  dwelling 
house,  with  two  rooms  on  the  lower  floor,  a  good  brick 
draw-well  at  the  door,  a  good  frame  barn  and  stables,  and 
a  fine  bearing  orchard  of  good  fruit.  Part  of  the  money 
to  be  paid  down,  and  a  reasonable  time  will  be  given  for 
the  remaining  part.  The  further  conditions  will  be  made 
known  on  the  day  of  sale,  and  attendance  given  by 

ABRAHAM  PETERS. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2100,  March  23, 
1769. 


404  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

On  Monday  last  as  Mr.  George  Henry,  of  this  City, 
Brass  Founder,  with  three  other  Men,  were  coming  from 
Burlington  in  a  Fishing  Boat,  off  Point-no-Point  the  Boat 
overset,  and  they  all  got  on  her  Bottom,  but  Mr.  Henry 
and  two  others  were  washed  off  and  drowned;  the  other 
Man  was  taken  off  by  a  Boat  from  the  Shore. 

TEN  DOLLARS  Reward. 

RUN  away  on  the  I2th  ult.  from  the  subscriber,  living 
in  Springfield  township,  Chester  county,  an  Irish  servant 
man,  named  Terence  Downy,  speaks  good  English,  is  5 
feet  10  inches  high,  25  years  of  age,  fresh  complexion, 
has  light  brown  curled  hair,  broad  shouldered,  and  a  well- 
shap'd  fellow :  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  an  old  castor 
hat,  old  light  coloured  cloth-jacket,  with  cuffs  of  the  same, 
an  old  red  serge  under  ditto,  patched  with  white  thread, 
sheepskin  breeches,  blue  ribbed  yarn  stockings,  and  old 
pumps,  with  carved  brass  buckles  in  them.  He  ran  away 
two  years  and  a  half  ago;  was  married  in  Bucks  county, 
and  called  his  name  Charles  Downing;  was  hired  in  the 
Jerseys,  and  there  called  his  name  William  Robinson. 
Whoever  takes  up  said  servant,  and  secures  him  in  any 
goal,  so  that  his  master  may  have  him  again,  shall  have 
the  above  reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by  me 

SAMUEL  LEVIS. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  116,  March  27- 
April  3,  1769. 

To  be  sold  on  Tuesday  the  eleventh  day  of  April  next,  at 

public  vendue. 

A  Farm  containing  200  acres  of  choice  land,  situate  in 
Freehold,  Monmouth  county,  and  province  of  East  New- 
Jersey,  on  which  there  is  a  good  dwelling-house,  barn,  and 
other  out-houses,  and  an  orchard  that  makes  in  a  good 
season  150  barrels  of  cyder,  and  has  at  least  15  acres  of 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4° 5 

good  meadow  ground.  The  conditions  will  be  made 
known  on  the  premises  on  the  day  of  sale,  by  the  proprie- 
tor. 

THOMAS  WALTON 

RuN-away  on  Wednesday  the  1 5th  of  March  inst.  from 
the  subscriber,  near  Pluckimin,  an  indented  Irish  servant 
man  named  Matthew  King :  He  is  about  6  feet  high,  and 
marked  with  the  small-pox;  had  on  when  he  went  away  a 
suit  of  home  made  mixt  grey  linsey  cloaths.  Whoever 
takes  up  and  secures  the  said  servant  in  any  of  his  Maj- 
esty's goals,  or  brings  him  to  his  master,  shall  receive 
Two  DOLLARS  reward,  and  all  reasonable  charges  paid,  by 

MARCUS  KING. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  Plantation  pleasantly  situated  on  the  East  Side  of 
Hackinsack  River,  about  a  Mile  and  a  Half  above  the 
Town,  containing  One  Hundred  and  three  Acres  of  choice 
Land.  There  is  on  it  a  good  Stone  House  of  two  Rooms, 
and  a  Cellar  under  it,  with  a  good  Barn,  Cyder  Mill  and 
Garden,  as  also  an  Orchard  of  about  150  bearing  Apple 
Trees,  with  other  Fruit  Trees.  There  is  about  20  Acres 
of  it  good  Wood-Land,  the  rest  clear  and  fit  for  Tillage, 
there  being  fifteen  Acres  now  in  Seed,  and  more  may  be 
put  in.  About  five  or  six  Acres  of  it  is  choice  fresh  Mead- 
ow. And  Boats  may  load  at  the  Door.  Any  Person  in- 
clining to  purchase,  may  apply  to  Abraham  P.  Lott,  Esq; 
in  New-York,  or  to  Lawrence  Vanderhoof,  the  Owner, 
living  on  the  Premises,  by  whom  a  good  Title  will  be 
given. 

THE  Creditors  of  William  Whitehead,  are  desired  to 
meet  at  the  Dwelling  House  of  William  Hick,  Innholder, 
at  Princeton,  on  Monday  the  3d  Day  of  July  next,  at  3 


406  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

o'Clock  in  the  Afternoon,  in  order  to  receive  the  Divi- 
dend of  his  Estate. 

ROBERT  STOCKTON,  )   ^ 
JOSEPH  STOCKTON,    ) 

N.  B.     Such  as  do  not  bring  in  their  Demands,  at  or 
before  that  Day,  will  be  altogether  excluded. 
Princeton,  March  22. 

Elizabeth-Toivn,  March  23,  1769. 

ALL  Persons  who  are  any  ways  indebted  to  the  Estate 
of  Noadiah  Potter,  late  of  the  Borough  of  Elizabeth,  in 
the  County  of  Essex,  and  Province  of  New-Jersey,  de- 
ceased, are  desired  to  make  speedy  Payment;  and  those 
who  have  any  Demands  on  said  Estate,  to  bring  in  their 
Accounts  that  the  same  may  be  adjusted,  by 

ROBERT  OGDEN,  Executor. 

To  BE  SOLD. 

THE  noted  plantation  at  Cheesquakes,  in  Middlesex 
county,  in  the  possession  of  Nicholas  Everson,  lying  on 
the  north  side  of  said  creek,  bounded  by  the  Raritan  river, 
and  opposite  the  city  of  Perth- Amboy;  A  large  quantity 
of  salt  meadow,  convenient  for  fishing  or  oystering  and 
fowling,  of  which  there  are  great  plenty,  in  their  seasons ; 
the  land  as  good  as  any  in  those  parts,  well  watered  and 
well  timber'd,  very  convenient  to  landing,  for  transporta- 
tion to  Amboy  or  New-York.  The  whole  lying  for  five 
hundred  acres  of  land  and  meadow :  And  a  good  title  will 
be  given  by  the  said 

NICHOLAS  EVERSON. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1369,  March  27,  1769. 

To  be  SOLD,  by  the  Subscribers, 

Two  pieces  of  land,  viz.  sixty  acres,  lying  in  Mount- 
Holly;  on  which  there  is  a  good  brick  dwelling-house,  a 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4°7 

good  frame  kitchen,  good  orchard,  stables  and  out-houses. 
And  twenty  acres  of  meadow  ground,  lying  some  distance 
from  the  other.  The  terms  of  sale  may  be  known,  by 
applying  to  JOHN  HATKINSON,  in  Mount-Holly,  or  JOHN 
CRIPPS,  living  near  Salem. 

If  GEORGE  SCHEINTS,  who  came  to  Philadelphia  from 
Francfort,  in  Germany,  about  14  years  ago,  is  living,  and 
will  apply  to  RICHARD  MOORE,  in  Alloway's  Creek,  Salem 
County,  he  may  hear  of  his  brother  HENRY  SCHEINTS, 
who  will  be  very  glad  of  the  opportunity  of  seeing  him. — - 
The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2101,  March  30,  1769. 

Perth-Amboy,  Middlesex  County,  March  30. 
Is  committed  to  this  gaol  a  young  Irishman,  who  calls 
himself  TIMOTHY  KEAFF,  he  says  he  broke  out  of  New- 
town  gaol  in  Bucks  County.  The  owner  is  desired  to 
come,  pay  charges,  and  take  him  away,  otherwise  he  will 
be  sold  out  to  pay  the  same  in  three  weeks  from  this  date, 
by  me  WILLIAM  JOLLY,  Gaoler. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  117,  April  3-10, 
1769. 

THE  Creditors  of  Thomas  Leonard,  deceased,  are  de- 
sired to  meet  at  the  House  of  William  Hick,  in  Prince- 
Town,  on  Monday  the  Nineteenth  Day  of  June  next,  be- 
tween the  Hours  of  10  o' Clock  in  the  Morning,  and  5  in 
the  Afternoon,  in  order  to  settle  their  Second  Dividend 
of  the  said  Leonard's  Estate. 

SAMUEL  TUCKER,    ] 

THOMAS  WATSON.        .     . 

JOB  STOCKTON,          \  Assignees. 

JOSEPH  OLDEN.        J 
March  22,  1769. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1371,  April  3,  1769. 


408  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

WHEREAS  Cornelius  Low  has  let  his  Farm  at  Rariton, 
for  a  short  Term,  and  it  did  not  suit  the  Person  who  took 
it,  either  to  hire  or  purchase  all  the  Stock  of  Cattle,  and 
Negro  Slaves,  consisting  of  Men,  Women  and  Children 
of  both  Sexes  and  different  Ages,  therefore  the  Stock  and 
Slaves  are  now  for  Sale,  or  any  of  the  Servants  will  be 
hired  out  by  the  Year,  at  a  cheap  Rate,  as  may  be  most 
convenient  to  those  that  want  them;  The  Slaves  were  all 
born  in  this  Country,  and  have  been  brought  up  from  their 
Infancy  to  the  farming  Business,  which  they  understand 
very  well,  having  managed  the  Farm  for  some  Years, 
without  an  Overseer :  All  that  remains  undisposed  of  on 
the  1 7th  of  this  Instant,  will  on  that  Day  be  sold  at  public 
Vendue,  at  the  said  Farm,  together  with  Horses,  Wag- 
gons, Ploughs,  Harrows,  and  farming  Utensils,  &c. 
Twelve  Months  Credit  will  be  given  to  those  who  pur- 
chase to  the  Amount  of  Three  Pounds  and  upwards,  giv- 
ing Security,  if  required,  and  as  the  Money  will  very  prob- 
ably not  be  wanted  at  the  End  of  that  Period,  a  longer 
Term  may  then  be  obtained,  as  shall  be  agreed  on. 

Rariton  Landing,  $d  April,  1769. 

Morristown,  March  2jth,  1769. 
FERDINAND. 

A  Large  noble  brown  bay  Stallion, 
near  seventeen  hands  high,  beautifully 
A  shap'd     from    head    to    croup,     was 

brought    from    England    in    the   year 
HORSE.  Sixty  Six,  for  the  improvement  of  the 

breed  of  horses  in  America.  The  Sire 
of  him  was  a  fine  Spanish  horse  (which  breed  is  allowed 
by  the  best  writers  to  excel  all  others)  his  dam  was  one 
of  the  ablest  hunters  in  England.  Will  serve  mares  the 
ensuing  season  at  Morrisdon,  in  the  county  of  Monmouth, 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4°9 

East  New- Jersey,  for  the  sum  of  four  pounds  Proclama- 
tion, and  if  the  mares  don't  prove  with  fole  this  season, 
they  may  be  served  again  next  Spring  for  two  pounds. 
Mares  will  be  taken  good  care  of,  and  pastured  at  a  rea- 
sonable rate,  there  are  to  be  seen  at  the  above  place,  four 
fine  colts  of  Ferdinand's  get,  that  promise  well  to  make 
good  able  Road  horses,  so  much  wanted  in  this  country. 
MICHAEL  KEARNEY. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1370,  April  6,  1769. 

ALL  Persons  indebted  to  the  Estate  of  John  Conner, 
Chapman,  deceased,  who  travelled  chiefly  in  the  Jerseys, 
either  by  Bond,  Bill,  Note,  or  Book  Debt,  are  desired  to 
pay  the  same  to  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Shrewsbury 
Township,  Monmouth  County,  East  Jersey,  on  or  before 
the  First  Day  of  May  next;  and  all  those  having  any 
Demands  against  the  said  John  Conner,  are  desired  to 
send  their  Accounts,  before  that  Date,  to  the  Subscriber, 
regularly  proved,  in  order  to  have  the  Estate  settled,  ac- 
cording to  Law. 

WILLIAM  MORTON,  Executor. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE,  Philadelphia,  CLEARED  Schooner 
Brittania,  H.  Johnson,  Salem. 

FIVE  POUNDS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  the  Union  Iron-works,  in  Hunterdon 
county,  West  New-Jersey,  on  Saturday,  the  2$th  of  Feb- 
ruary last,  an  indented  servant  man,  named  Dennis  She- 
han,  sometimes  goes  by  name  of  Dennis  Stevens,  this 
country  born,  about  5  feet  8  inches  high,  and  27  years  of 
age,  by  trade  a  mill-wright ;  he  is  a  fresh  healthy  looking 
man,  vvears  his  ozvn  black  hair,  tied,  has  a  scar  on  one  of 
his  cheeks,  remarkable  white  eyes,  and  a  down  look,  zvhen 


4-IO  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

in  conversation,  his  jaws  are  apt  to  snap  when  eating,  and 
wants  several  of  his  foreteeth;  had  on,  when  he  went 
away,  a  broadcloth  coat  and  jacket,  little  worn,  half  worn 
buckskin^breeches,  new  shoes,  brass  buckles,  and  light  blue 
coloured  milled  stockings,  a  half  worn  beaver  hat,  check 
shirt;  he  appears  to  be  a  quiet  simple  fellow,  but  is  artful, 
and  fond  of  strong  liquors,  very  talkative  when  drunk, 
will  say  much  of  his  knowledge  in  the  mill-wright  trade, 
(may  pretend  to  know  something  of  the  founder's  busi- 
ness at  an  iron  furnace,  and  many  other  things,  of  which 
he  is  quite  ignorant.  Whoever  takes  up  and  secures  said 
servant  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  goals,  or  delivers  him  to 
Joseph  Turner  in  Philadelphia,  or  to  the  Subscriber  at  the 
iron-works  aforesaid,  shall  receive  the  above  reward,  and 
all  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

ROBERT  TAYLOR,  at  Union  Forge. 
— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette  No.  2102,  April  6,  1769. 

TEN  DOLLARS  Reward. 

RUN  AWAY  from  Hendrick  Coyler  of  East  New- Jersey, 
a  NEGRO  FELLOW  named  Ishmael,  by  trade  a  blacksmith, 
is  much  pitted  with  the  small  pox  and  has  a  blemish  in  one 
eye,  is  a  great  fiddler  and  is  often  shewing  slight  of  hand 
tricks;  has  a  Squaw  for  a  wife.  He  got  leave  of  his  mas- 
ter about  two  years  since  to  go  towards  Middleton  to  look 
a  master;  it  is  said  he  has  worked  some  time  at  the  iron 
works  near  Spotswood;  'tis  thought  he  is  since  gone  to- 
wards Pennsylvania;  he  has  been  acquainted  about  East- 
Town.  Whoever  takes  up  said  fellow,  and  delivers  him 
to  Capt.  ELIAS  DAYTON,  in  Elizabeth-town,  or  said  COY- 
LER at  Horse-Neck,  shall  have  the  above  reward,  with 
reasonable  charges  paid  by 

HENDRICK  COYLER. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,   No.    1374,   April   6, 
1769. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  41  l 

Notice  is  hereby  given  to  whom  it  may  concern,  that 
the  Owners  and  Possessors  of  the  Meadows  and  Marshes 
on  both  Sides  of  Manington  Creek,  in  the  County  of  Sa- 
lem, and  Province  of  West  New-Jersey,  do  intend  to  peti- 
tion the  House  of  General  Assembly  of  the  said  Province 
for  leave  to  bring  in  a  Bill  to  dig  Ditches,  or  a  Canal, 
through  the  said  Marsh,  in  order  to  prevent  the  Water 
overflowing  the  said  Meadow,  and  likewise  to  remove  the 
Bank  from  where  it  now  stands,  and  erect  another  further 
down  the  said  Creek.  —  The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No. 
1  1  8,  April  10-17, 


PUBLIC  notice  is  hereby  given,  that  the  trustees  of 
Queen's  College,  are  desired  to  meet  on  Thursday  the  4th 
of  May  next,  at  the  house  of  Henricus  Cuiper,  Esq;  at 
Horsimus,  in  the  County  of  Bergen. 

DAVID  MARINUS,  Clerk. 

To  be  sold  or  let,  a  fine  plantation,  containing  167  acres 
of  choice  good  land,  lying  7  miles  from  Elizabeth-Town, 
in  Springfield;  with  a  good  double  house,  barn,  and  saw- 
mill, and  a  fine  situation  for  a  grist-mill;  well  watered 
and  timbered  with  a  good  orchard,  out-houses,  &c.  The 
title  may  be  depended  upon  to  be  good,  as  all  incumbrances 
are  taken  off;  easy  payments  will  be  taken,  paying  inter- 
est. The  vendue  to  be  held  on  the  premises,  on  Thursday 
the  2oth  Instant  April,  at  one  o'  Clock  in  the  Afternoon, 
where  the  Conditions  will  be  made  known  by  NATHANIEL 
and  EZEKIEL  BALL.  If  any  person  incline  to  purchase  said 
farm  before  the  day  of  sale,  may  apply  to  the  subscribers, 
who  will  agree  on  reasonable  terms. 

THE  Members  of  the  New-  Jersey  Medical  Society,  are 
desired  to  remember,  that  their  next  stated  General  Meet- 
ing, will  be  on  the  first  Tuesday  in  May  next,  at  the  House 


412  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

of  Mr.  Duff,  in  New-Brunswick.  And  as  some  important 
Matters  respecting  the  farther  Establishment,  &c.  of  said 
Society,  will  be  taken  into  consideration,  the  Members  are 
desired  to  be  as  punctual  in  attending  as  possible,  and  as 
early  in  the  Day  as  may  be. 

Those  Gentlemen  of  the  Profession,  in  the  Province, 
who  have  not  hitherto  joined  the  Society,  are  invited  to 
attend  at  the  Time  and  Place  above  mentioned. 

ISAAC  SMITH,  Secretary. 

Fifteen  Dollars  Reward, 

RuN-away  from  Jacob  Starn,  living  on  Change  Water 
Iron  Works,  in  Sussex  county,  West  New-Jersey,  some 
time  in  March,  in  the  year  1768,  an  Irish  servant  Man, 
named  Thomas  Murphy,  about  5  feet  8  inches  high,  well 
set,  black  curl'd  hair,  a  shoemaker  by  trade,  which  he  un- 
doubtedly now  follows,  as  he  was  a  middling  good  work- 
man at  the  same :  He  is  about  19  years  of  age,  he  work'd 
at  his  trade  from  the  time  he  run  away  till  about  the  mid- 
dle or  latter  end  of  June,  along  the  North  River,  near 
Kinderhook,  Claverack,  and  Livingston's  Manor,  and 
there  chang'd  his  name  from  Thomas  Murphy,  to  Thomas 
Newman,  and  passed  by  the  name  of  the  New-England 
shoemaker,  and  from  there  it  is  said  he  went  to  New-Eng- 
land. Whoever  shall  apprehend  and  secure  said  servant 
in  any  of  his  Majesty's  goals,  so  that  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  or  bring  him  to  Dirck  Brinckerhoff,  of  the  city 
of  New-York,  Merchant,  shall  have  the  above  fifteen  dol- 
lars reward,  and  reasonable  charges,  paid  by 

JACOB  STARN,  or  DIRCK  BRINCKERHOFF. 
— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
911,  April  10,  1769. 

Salem,  April  13,  1769. 
WHEREAS  the  partnership  of  BARTRAM  and  LITHGOW 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  4J3 

is  expired,  all  persons  indebted  to  said  partnership,  are 
requested  to  pay  off  their  respective  ballances  immediately. 
DANIEL  LITHGOW  carries  on  the  business,  as  usual,  at 
Salem  Bridge,  and  has  just  got  a  neat  assortment  of  goods, 
suitable  for  the  season,  which  he  will  sell  on  very  reason- 
able terms.  He  thanks  the  public  for  their  former  favours, 
and  hopes  for  a  continuance  thereof. 

Philadelphia,  April  n,  1769. 

RUN  away,  yesterday,  from  the  Subscriber,  living  in 
Burlington  county,  West  Jersey,  an  Irish  servant  man, 
named  Francis  Nevel,  but  it  is  likely  he  may  change  his 
name,  he  is  of  light  complexion,  5  feet  10  inches  high,  has 
short  thin  straight  hair,  fresh  coloured  with  a  small  mole 
on  one  cheek,  and  a  small  scar  on  the  other;  had  on,  a 
brown  coat,  bound  round  with  worsted,  old  castor  hat, 
leather  breeches,  black  stockings,  and  old  shoes.  All  mas- 
ters of  vessels  are  forbid  to  carry  him  off  at  their  peril. 
Whoever  secures  said  servant,  so  that  his  master  may  have 
him  again,  shall  receive  Four  Dollars  reward,  paid  by 

SOLOMON  RIDGWAY. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2103,  April  13, 
1769. 

To  be  sold  by  the  subscriber,  in  the  city  of  Philadelphia, 

the  following  tracts  of  land,  viz. 

A  PLANTATION  containing  about  300  acres,  60  whereof 
are  cleared,  20  acres  of  good  meadow  and  more  may  be 
made,  the  remainder  is  well  timbered;  there  is  a  good 
dwelling  house  and  orchard,  a  barn,  and  other  out-houses 
thereon;  also  a  grist  mill  with  one  pair  of  stones,  and  a 
fulling  mill,  with  press,  shop,  dye  house,  tenter  bars,  and 
all  other  tools  and  utensils,  necessary  for  carrying  on  the 
fulling  business;  situate  on  the  main  branch  of  Great 


41 4  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

Timber  Creek,  in  the  county  of  Gloucester,  in  the  western 
division  of  the  province  of  New-Jersey,  in  a  good  part  of 
the  country  for  trade,  being  within  a  mile  of  navigable 
water  on  the  said  creek,  and  eight  miles  from  the  town 
of  Gloucester.  It  is  an  old  accustomed  place  for  business, 
both  in  the  grinding  and  fulling  way,  and  is  well  situated 
for  a  store,  being  in  a  thick  inhabited  part  of  the  country, 
and  within  a  small  distance  of  several  saw  mills,  on  the 
same  creek.  The  land  is  good,  and  capable  of  producing 
any  kind  of  grain;  the  mill,  with  a  trifling  expence  may 
be  rendered  fit  for  merchant  work,  and  though  there  may 
not  be  a  sufficient  quantity  of  wheat  to  be  purchased  in 
that  part  of  the  country,  yet  the  cost  of  transporting  it 
from  Philadelphia,  will  be  very  small,  and  consequently 
conveying  the  flour  back  to  market  will  be  the  same,  there 
being  but  one  mile  land  carriage,  and  even  this  might  be 
prevented  by  a  little  trouble  in  cleaning  the  creek  of  brush, 
&c.  as  it  is  of  sufficient  depth  for  a  battoe,  or  other  small 
craft,  to  carry  a  load  from  the  landing  to  the  mill's  tail, 
so  that  the  advantages  arising  from  this  branch  will  ren- 
der it  very  valuable  to  the  purchaser.  It  will  be  sold  alto- 
gether, or  divided  into  two  parts,  as  will  best  suit  the 
buyer,  there  being  a  house  (exclusive  of  the  one  already 
mentioned)  on  the  other  end  of  the  place,  in  which  a  ten- 
ant now  lives. 

Also  a  piece  of  cedar  swamp  containing  about  70  acres, 
well  stocked  with  fine  young  timber,  situate  on  a  main 
branch  of  Great  Egg  Harbour  River,  called  Squancum, 
about  15  miles  from  a  landing  on  Timber  Creek,  in  the 
county  and  province  aforesaid. 

Any  person  who  has  a  mind  to  view  either  of  the  afore- 
said places,  may  apply  to  RANDLE  MARSHALL,  living  on 
the  first  mentioned,  and  for  terms  of  sale,  to 

JOHN  HEATON. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  41S 

WHEREAS  one  William  Rawson,  of  the  township  of 
Greenwich,  in  the  county  of  Gloucester,  in  the  western 
division  of  the  province  of  New-Jersey,  some  time  in  Feb- 
ruary last,  obtained  of  me  the  subscriber,  in  a  wicked,  de- 
ceitful and  fraudulent  manner,  five  promisary  notes,  the 
whole  amounting  to  about  £.21,  for  which  I  never  re- 
ceived any  manner  of  consideration;  therefore  I  do  here- 
by forwarn  all  persons  not  to  take  an  assignment  on  said 
notes,  or  any  of  them,  as  I  am  determined  not  to  pay  them, 
they  being  obtained  as  aforesaid. 

April  19,  1769.  JACOB  LONG. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  119,  April  17-24. 
1769. 

WHEREAS  I  the  Subscriber,  of  Connecticut  Farms,  in 
the  County  of  Essex,  and  Province  of  New- Jersey,  and  my 
Wife  Hannah,  (some  Times  calling  herself  Hannah  Wil- 
lis, the  Relict  of  Isaac  Willis,  deceased,)  have  by  mutual 
Consent  lived  separate  from  each  other  for  some  Years 
past;  and  now  by  the  Suggestion  of  some  evil  minded 
Persons,  my  said  Wife  hath  run  me  considerably  in  Debt; 
these  are  therefore  to  forbid  all  Persons  whomsoever, 
trusting  or  crediting  her  the  said  Hannah  on  my  Account, 
as  I  am  determined  to  pay  no  more  Debts  of  her  contract- 
ing, from  the  Date  hereof. 

RUEBEN  CHERRY 

STOLEN  out  of  the  Stable  of  Eliphalet  Johnson,  at  New- 
ark, on  Saturday  Night  the  I5th  Instant,  a  dark  bay  Horse 
about  fourteen  Hands  high,  6  Years  old,  trots  heavy,  but 
goes  a  good  hand-gallop :  his  mane  is  half  hoged  on  the 
left  Side,  and  the  Hair  wore  off  under  the  Mane  on  the 
Right  Side :  He  is  marked  with  the  Letter  N.  on  the  left 
Shoulder :  He  has  a  few  grey  Hairs  in  his  Forehead,  and 
the  Hair  wore  off  his  Sides  with  the  Stirups.  Whoever 


416  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

takes  up  and  secures  said  Horse  and  Thief,  so  that  he  may 
be  brought  to  Justice,  shall  receive  Five  Pounds  Reward, 
and  whoever  takes  up  and  returns  said  Horse,  without  the 
Thief,  shall  have  Five  Dollars,  and  reasonable  Charges, 
paid  by 

ELIPHALET  JOHNSON 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
912,  April  17,  1769. 

STOLEN  out  of  the  House  of  the  Subscriber,  in  Horse 
Neck,  on  the  Morning  of  the  I5th  of  this  Instant  April,  a 
large  Silver  Tankard,  that  will  contain  three  Pints,  markt 
with  the  Letters  C.I.B.  and  stampt  I.B  or  P.G.  Whoever 
will  bring  said  Tankard  to  me  in  Horse  Neck,  or  to  Alex- 
ander Montgomery,  Tavern  Keeper,  near  the  Ship  Yards 
in  New- York,  or  will  apprehend  the  Thief  or  Thieves,  so 
that  he  or  they  may  be  Convicted,  shall  have  a  Reward  of 
Five  Dollars,  and  all  reasonable  Charges  paid  by 

MATTHEW  MEAD. 

At  Public  VENDUE 
On  Wednesday  the  jd  of  May  next,  at  Colonel  SCHUY- 

LERS,  Second  River,  will  be  SOLD. 
A  Red  Cedar  framed  Boat,  that  will  carry  about  n 
Cords  of  Wood,  and  has  good  new  Rigging. 

To  be  sold  at  publick  Vendue,  on  Wednesday  the  ijth 
of  May,  a  tract  containing  360  acres  of  excellent  land, 
with  a  very  good  dwelling-house  almost  new,  pleasantly 
situated  on  an  eminence,  commanding  a  very  fine  prospect 
over  the  low  lands,  with  three  fire-places,  and  a  good  cellar 
under  it;  also  a  very  large  barn  50  feet  long,  34  wide,  well 
built,  covered  with  Cedar,  a  good  well  at  the  door,  two 
large  young  orchards,  the  trees  mostly  grafted  with  the 
best  of  fruit;  there  may  be  made  near  100  barrels  of  cider 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  41 7 

in  one  year,  and  double  that  when  the  trees  get  their 
growth,  also  plenty  of  peaches ;  there  is  on  this  tract  about 
100  acres  of  excellent  wheat  land,  also  50  acres  very  suit- 
able for  hemp;  there  can  be  cut  yearly  80  tons  of  good 
Hay;  and  much  more  may  be  got  with  little  expence: 
This  tract  of  land  is  exceedingly  well  wooded  and  watered ; 
it  lies  in  the  County  of  Morris,  Township  of  Hanover,  on 
the  Neck,  bounded  on  Passaick  river,  where  there  is  plenty 
of  fish  and  wild  fowl  in  the  season;  it  lies  13  miles  from 
Newark,  18  from  Elizabeth-Town,  and  within  half  a  mile 
of  Mr.  Green's  meeting-house,  in  a  very  pleasant  healthy 
part  of  the  country,  a  place  remarkable  for  good  markets, 
having  a  great  number  of  iron  works  back  of  it.  Any  per- 
son choosing  to  purchase  before  the  day  of  public  sale,  may 
apply  to  Peter  Smith,  on  the  premises,  who  will  agree,  and 
give  a  good  title  for  the  same;  or  to  Jacamiah  Smith,  near 
Elizabeth-Town.  The  conditions  of  vendue  will  be  made 
known  at  the  day  of  sale,  by 

PETER  SMITH 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1372,  April  20,  1769. 

A  LIST  of  LETTERS  remaining  in  the  Post-Office,  Phila. 
A.     Josiah  Appleton,  N.  Jersey. 

H.  William  Hogg,  Gloucester;  John  Hatton,  West- 
Jersey. 

J.     Richard  Jones,  Woodberry. 

S.     Samuel  Shivers,  Gloucester  Co. 

T.     John  Thompson,  N.  Jersey. 

THESE  are  to  give  Notice,  That  a  Number  of  the  In- 
habitants, on  both  Sides  of  great  Timber  Creek,  in  the 
County  of  Gloucester,  intend  to  present  a  Petition  to  the 
General  Assembly  of  New- Jersey;  at  the  next  Sessions, 
praying  Leave,  that  a  Bill  may  be  brought  in,  to  build  a 


27 


41 8  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS. 

Bridge  over  said  Creek  to  and  from  the  Lands  late  George 
Marple's  and  Samuel  Clements,  deceased,  to  be  so  con- 
structed as  not  to  interrupt  the  Navigation 

New-Jersey,  April  4,  1769 

As  sundry  Gentlemen,  in  and  about  Philadelphia,  are 
desirous  of  raising  Colts,  out  of  the  celebrated  English 
hunting  Horse,  called  FREDERICK,  that  is  kept  for  cover- 
ing Mares  in  Monmouth  County,  East- Jersey,  they  may 
have  an  Opportunity  of  sending  Mares  to  him  the  1 5th  of 
May,  by  applying  to  ROBERT  BAINES,  at  Mr.  RHEA'S 
Stable,  in  Church-Alley,  any  Time  before  the  said  Date, 
and  no  Expence  will  attend  them,  but  the  Ferriage,  and 
eating  upon  the  Road,  and  the  Mares  will  be  returned 
them  again,  when  done  with  the  Horse  (Accidents  ex- 
cepted.)  The  Price  for  covering,  for  the  Season,  will  be 
Eight  Dollars,  and  Eighteen  pence  per  Week  Pasturage, 
for  the  Mares,  to  be  paid  at  their  Return;  or  they  may 
have  their  Mares  warranted  to  be  with  Foal  for  Five 
Pounds,  and  if  they  do  not  prove  so,  the  Money  will  be 
returned  again  upon  Honour. 

THE  subscriber  hereof  having  heretofore  been  possessed 
of  a  considerable  estate,  but,  by  the  unforeseen  hardness 
of  the  times,  the  falling  of  the  price  of  lands,  and  other 
disappointments  and  losses,  he  has  become  incapable  to 
satisfy  all  his  creditors;  in  order,  however,  that  none  of 
them  might  lose  all  their  demands,  he  surrendered  and  de- 
livered up  his  estate  to  them,  with  which,  some  of  said 
creditors  rest  satisfied,  but  others  being  of  a  more  craving, 
relentless  and  vindictive  disposition,  refuse  to  comply  with 
any  terms  (notwithstanding  many  have  been  proposed) 
till  the  whole  of  their  debts  are  paid,  and  have  thrown  him 
into  confinement,  where  he  has  remained  a  prisoner  for  1 1 
months  past;  these  debts  he  is  by  no  means  able  to  pay, 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  419 

he  therefore,  as  the  last  resource,  is  under  'the  disagreeable 
necessity,  of  giving  this  notice  to  all  his  creditors,  that  he 
intends  to  apply  at  the  next  session  of  General  Assembly, 
of  the  province  of  New-Jersey,  for  an  act  to  regain  his 
liberty,  of  which  all  persons  concerned  are  desired  to  take 

notice.1 

WILLIAM  BROWN. 

THE  Subscriber  hereof  having  heretofore  been  pos- 
sessed of  a  considerable  estate,  but  by  the  unforeseen 
hardness  of  the  times,  disappointments,  and  losses  in  trade, 
and  otherwise,  the  low  price  in  sale  of  his  lands,  which 
have  been  sold  for  the  benefit  of  his  creditors,  has  rendered 
him  unable  to  settle  with  his  creditors  to  their  full  de- 
mands, to  which  some  of  said  creditors  are  willing  to  com- 
pound, and  be  satisfied,  but  others  being  of  a  more  crav- 
ing, relentless  disposition,  refuse  to  comply  with  any 
terms,  till  the  whole  of  their  debts  are  paid,  which  his  cir- 
cumstances render  him  incapable  to  do  at  present,  though 
he  is  willing  to  give  up  his  all  to  them ;  but  have  confined 
him  in  the  county  goal  at  Gloucester,  for  near  seven 
months  past,  which  puts  him  under  the  disagreeable  ne- 
cessity, as  the  last  resource,  to  seek  some  other  method 
for  aid.  These  are  therefore  to  give  notice  to  all  persons 
concerned,  that  he  purposes  to  apply  at  the  next  meeting 
of  the  General  Assembly  of  the  province  of  New- Jersey, 
for  relief  in  the  premises. 

WILLIAM  BURNET. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2104,  April  20, 
1769. 

Extract  of  a  letter  from  a  gentleman  in _,  to 

his  friend,  a  merchant,  in  Philadelphia,  dated  April  15, 
^1769. 

i  This  and  the  next  following  advertisement  are  copied  from  that  of 
George  Reading,  page  374,  ante. 


420  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

"I've  been  seeing  my  relations  in  Virginia,  whom  I  have 
not  visited  these  14  years  past,  and  in  taverns  and  friends 
houses  where  I  lodged  on  my  way  through  the  Jerseys, 
Pennsylvania,  and  Maryland,  I  found  the  people  of  all 
sorts  greatly  alarmed  by  the  late  revenue  acts;  the  dissolv- 
ing of  our  provincial  Parliaments  or  Assemblies;  the  new 
courts  of  Admiralty  erected  on  our  coasts,  the  being  de- 
prived of  Juries  in  many  cases  to  be  tried;  the  British  gov- 
ernment rejecting  the  petitions  lately  sent  them  from  the 
colonies;  and  their  now  proposing  to  send  for  Otis,  Gush- 
ing, &c  to  carry  them  home  as  traitors,  and  try  them  for 
their  lives.  These  things  have  blown  up  the  minds  of  the 
people  into  a  high  flame  for  industry  all  over  the  countries, 
so  that  several  townships  as  I  came  along  were  resolving 
speedily  to  meet  and  enter  into  strict  agreements  against 
buying  any  more  English  goods,  especially  their  woolen, 
silk,  and  callico  fineries,  but  each  family  vigorously  to  set 
about  manufacturing  their  own  cloathing,  and  every  other 
necessary  article.  I  happened  also  into  company  where 
some  farmers  and  a  physician  were  about  agreeing  with 
an  eminent  silk-weaver,  late  from  Dublin,  about  erecting 
a  silk  manufactory,  as  mulberries  grow  plentiful  in  the 
woods.  At  another  gentleman's  house  where  I  was,  his 
lady  was  spinning  fast,  and  had  five  clever  girls  spinning 
along  with  her  ever  since  they  heard  that  the  Boston  Par- 
liament was  dissolved;  it's  expected  they  will  soon  have 
a  good  deal  of  cloth  to  sell.  When  riding  along  the  road 
last  week,  I  saw  sometimes  country  girls  pointed  out  and 
hissed  at  for  wearing  scarlet  and  callicoes;  beh!  says  a 
bachelor,  there  ride  two  saucy  dames,  none  of  them  a  match 
for  me;  she  never  will  make  a  coat  for  me,  when  it  seems 
her  mamma  never  yet  learned  her  to  spin  a  coat  nor  mantle 
for  her  dear  sweet  self;  this  put  the  girls  to  the  blush,  and 

so  rode  off — The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No. 

1376,  April  20,  1769. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  421 

On  Thursday  last  the  Honourable  JARED  INGERSOLL, 
Esq;  Judge  of  the  Vice-Admiralty  Court,  for  this  District 
arrived  in  Town  from  New-Haven.  He  is  empowered  to 
hear  Appeal  Causes  from  the  Vice-Admiralty  Courts  of 
Virginia,  Maryland,  New- York,  New-Jersey,  Pennsyl- 
vania, and  the  Counties  of  New  Castle,  Kent  and  Sussex 
on  Delaware. 

The  Circuit  Courts,  in  the  Western  Division  of  the 
Province  of  New- Jersey,  are  appointed  to  be  held  as  fol- 
fows : — At  Salem  the  2d  of  May;  at  Cumberland  the 
5th;  at  Hunterdon  the  i6th;  at  Sussex  the  24th. — The 
Pennsylvania  Chronicle,  No.  120,  April  2^-May  i,  1769. 

Whereas  a  certain  Joseph  Pledger, 

A  Shop  Joiner  by  Trade,  left  the  Town  of  Salem,  West 
New-Jersey,  in  the  Year  1765.  If  the  said  Joseph  Pledger 
be  living,  he  is  desired  to  return  to  the  said  Town  of  Sa- 
lem, where  he  may  be  informed  of  something  greatly  to 
his  Advantage.  But  should  he  be  dead,  it  will  be  taken 
very  kind  if  any  Person  will  inform  me  of  it. 

ROBERT  JOHNSON 

PURSUANT  to  an  order  of  Jacob  Ford,  and  Samuel  Tut- 
tle,  Esqrs,  two  of  the  judges  of  the  inferior  court  of  Com- 
mon Pleas,  for  the  county  of  Morris,  Notice  is  hereby 
given  to  the  respective  creditors  of  Robert  Mountain,  an 
insolvent  debtor,  in  the  goal  of  the  county  of  Morris,  that 
they  be  and  appear  at  the  Court  House  in  Morris  Town, 
in  the  county  of  Morris,  on  Thursday  the  nth  day  of 
May  next,  at  n  o'clock  in  the  morning,  to  shew  cause  (if 
any  they  have)  why  an  assignment  should  not  be  made 
of  the  said  debtor's  estate,  and  he  discharged,  agreeable 
to  the  directions  of  late  act  of  the  governor,  council,  and 
general  assembly  of  the  province  of  New-Jersey,  entitled, 


422  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

"An  act  for  the  relief  of  insolvent  debtors." — The  New 
York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No.  913,  April  24, 
1769. 

New-York,  April  24.  A  Letter  from  the  back  Part  of 
Elizabeth-Town,  greatly  laments  the  extreme  Cold  Weath- 
er all  last  Week,  and  particularly  Monday  Night  last  was 
said  to  be  the  coldest  that  ever  was  known  at  this  Season. 
The  ice  in  many  Places  was  a  full  Inch  thick;  and  the 
great  Peach  Orchard  belonging  to  Mr.  Miller  of  that  Bor- 
ough, consisting  of  upwards  of  11,000  fine  Trees,  being 
then  in  full  Bloom,  was  entirely  blasted  for  this  Year,  and 
about  Tool.  Damage  to  its  Owner.  And  indeed  it  is 
thought  the  Peaches  are  universally  gone  this  Way,  as 
well  as  several  other  Fruits  in  Bloom,  tho'  it  is  hoped  the 
Apples  may  not  have  suffered  so  much,  they  being  not 
yet  open.  We  are  assured  also,  that  the  Wheat  in  all  Clay 
Soils,  in  the  Jerseys,  is  prodigiously  thrown  out  and  per- 
ished, during  the  Winter,  so  that  the  Crops  in  all  such 
Land  will  certainly  fall  very  short.  When  God's  Judg- 
ments are  on  the  Earth,  the  Inhabitants  thereof  should 
learn  Righteousness. — The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly 
Post  Boy,  No.  1373,  April  24,  1769. 

Woodbridge,  New-Jersey,  April  21,  1769 

DANIEL  WALTON,  of  the  Manor  of  Moreland,  in  Phil- 
adelphia county,  is  hereby  informed,  that  his  runaway  ser- 
vant JAMES  BYRN,  is  in  my  custody,  and  he  is  desired  to 
come,  pay  charges,  and  take  him  away. 

NATHANIEL  HEARD. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

By  the  SUBSCRIBER,  and  may  be  entered  upon  next  Fall, 
A  VALUABLE  PLANTATION,  and  TRACT  of  LAND,  contain- 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  423 

ing  243  acres,  situate  on  the  river  Delaware,  in  the  town- 
ship of  Chester,  in  the  County  of  Burlington,  West- Jersey, 
about  10  miles  from  Cooper's  Ferries,  by  land,  and  about 
the  same  distance  from  Philadelphia,  by  water;  there  is 
on  said  premises,  a  good  two  story  framed  house,  a  good 
kitchen,  stone  smoke-house,  and  sundry  other  convenient 
buildings,  a  small  apple  orchard,  and  sundry  other  fruit 
trees,  about  60  or  70  acres  of  upland  cleared,  and  within 
good  fence,  which  is  very  fertile  for  grain  or  market 
truck;  there  is  also  about  20  acres  of  excellent  meadow 
cleared,  most  part  of  which  is  under  green  grass  and  Tim- 
othy, and  well  secured  from  the  tide,  about  30  acres  more 
may  be  made.  The  title  is  indisputable.  Any  person  in- 
clinable to  purchase,  may  know  the  terms,  by  applying  to 
the  Subscriber,  living  on  the  premises. 

ISAAC  ROGERS. 

EIGHT  DOLLARS  Reward. 

RUN  away  from  the  Subscriber,  living  near  Indian 
River,  an  indented  Servant  Man,  named  PURMOTT  LEE, 
about  6  Feet  high,  25  Years  of  Age,  and  a  little  hard  of 
Hearing,  was  born  at  Egg-Harbour,  where  it  is  supposed 
he  is  now,  as  his  Wife  and  Father  were  seen  travelling 
the  Road  that  leads  to  that  Place.  Whoever  takes  up  the 
said  Servant,  and  brings  him  to  John  Mifflin,  Merchant  in 
Philadelphia,  or  to  his  Master  at  Indian  River,  shall  re- 
ceive the  above  Reward,  from 

JOHN  JONES. 

Salem,  West  New- Jersey,  April  19,  1769. 
TWELVE  DOLLARS  Reward. 

ABSCONDED  from  his  usual  Place  of  Abode,  on  the  i6th 
Instant,  a  certain  Doctor  THOMAS  OGLE,  born  in  Ireland, 
about  five  Feet  six  or  seven  Inches  high,  pitted  with  the 


424  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

Small-pox,  is  given  to  Liquor,  and  when  in  Drink  talks 
much  of  his  Skill  in  Physic  and  Surgery,  has  had  one  of 
his  Legs  broke,  and  commonly  wears  a  Handkerchief  about 
it;  had  on,  when  he  went  away,  a  half  worn  Beaver  Hat, 
Bearskin  Coat,  Buckskin  Breeches,  Worsted  Stockings, 
and  good  Shoes,  with  Pinch  beck  Buckles.  He  took  with 
him  a  Silver  Watch,  a  Silver  Face,  Maker's  Name  Wm. 
Clayton,  London,  No.  2450,  rode  a  sorrel  Horse,  with  a 
Blaze  in  his  Face;  and  had  a  Couple  of  Boxes,  with  Medi- 
cines in  them  (like  a  Pedlar's  Pack}  and  a  Suit  of  Fustian, 
not  made  up.  Whoever  takes  up  the  said  Dr.  Ogle,  and 
secures  him  in  any  of  his  Majesty's  Goals,  shall  receive  the 
above  Reward. 
THOMAS  HARTLEY,  DANIEL  LITHGOW,  PETER  AMBLER. 

N.  B.  All  Watch-Makers  are  desired  to  stop  the  said 
Watch,  if  offered  for  Sale,  or  otherwise. — The  Pennsylva- 
nia Gazette,  No.  2105,  April  27,  1769. 

To  be  LET  or  SOLD, 
By  the  SUBSCRIBER, 

A  TRACT  of  LAND,  containing  one  hundred  acres  (di- 
vided into  lots)  situate  in  Gloucester  county,  West  New- 
Jersey,  bounded  by  lands  of  Daniel  and  William  Cooper, 
and  the  river  Delaware,  opposite  Market  and  Chestnut 
streets  in  the  city  of  Philadelphia;  a  plan  of  which  is  to 
be  seen  at  the  London  Coffee  house,  at  Peter  Thomson's, 
Conveyances,  in  Race  street,  and  at  the  subscriber's  in 
Arch  street. 

As  it  is  not  the  intention  of  the  subscriber  to  magnify 
the  advantages  which  tenants  or  purchasers  of  lots  will 
have,  he  hopes  he  may  be  permitted  to  mention  a  few 
things  which  must  strike  and  shew  the  eligibleness  of  his 
plan. 

He  takes  it  for  granted  it  is  universally  known,  that  the 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  42  5 

pleasant  and  profitable,  have  generally  been  chosen  by  the 
wisest  of  men,  in  preference  to  either  of  them  separately; 
and  though  to  a  trading  people  it  must  be  confessed  that 
many  profitable  advantages  may  arise  from  situation 
alone,  yet  however  men  may  engage  themselves  in  the  pur- 
suit of  wealth,  it  should  be  their  principal  care  to  live 
where  delightful  prospects  and  wholesome  air  invites 
them ;  for  what  will  it  avail  to  acquire  all  the  good  things 
of  this  life,  if  health  afterwards  is  wanting  to  enjoy  them. 
The  agreeable  situation  of  these  lots  it  must  be  allowed 
are  inviting.  It  may  be  said  with  great  justice,  that  while 
the  air  is  dry  and  wholesome,  the  prospect  on  all  sides  but 
particularly  of  this  city,  is  delightfully  pleasant.  They 
abound  with  many  natural  advantages  as  well  for  pleasure 
as  for  business,  fishing  and  fowling;  a  soil  fitted  for  gar- 
dening and  the  raising  of  earlier  fruits  than  Pennsylvania 
affords;  the  opportunity  of  purchasing  all  kind  of  pro- 
visions as  an  addition  towards  house-keeping;  the  con- 
veniency  of  being  near  the  city  of  Philadelphia  for  distil- 
leries, breweries,  lumber  yards,  stores  and  other  offices, 
all  which  advantages  they  have  besides  many  others,  of 
being  suitable  for  the  business  of  most  kinds  of  mechan- 
icks.  Or  should  gentlemen  incline  to  become  purchasers, 
they  may  be  also  equally  well  accommodated.  The  diver- 
sions of  fishing  and  fowling  has  been  already  mentioned, 
add  to  these  the  pleasant  amusement  of  sailing  on  the 
water  in  summer,  and  the  certainty  of  having  excellent 
roads  for  carriages  and  riding  in  winter  are  things  not  to 

be  ranked  amongst  the  least  desireable " Sailing  and 

riding  says  a  great  author,  are  profitable  exercises,  while 
they  relax  the  mind,  they  strengthen  the  body,  and  enable 
it  to  pursue  industry  with  more  spirit."  Persons  whose 
weak  or  sickly  state  of  body  call  for  proper  air  and  relax- 
ation, may  also  be  suitably  accommodated.  If  their  dis- 


426  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

orders  require  the  drinking  of  mineral  waters,  they  are  at 
hand;  while  change  of  air  through  a  delightful  country, 
which  physicians  often  successfully  recommend,  may  from 
the  goodness  of  the  roads,  be  used  at  all  seasons. 

As  to  the  title  and  terms  on  which  the  premises  are  to 
be  disposed  of,  apply  to 

JACOB  COOPER. 

A7-       r  THOMAS  HELMS,  a  prisoner  confined 

New-Jersey,     ) 

Sussex  County,  \       m  the  Za°l  °f  the  said  county  °f  Sus~ 
sex,  by  his  petition  to  the  justices  of 

the  supreme  court  of  judicature  for  the  province  aforesaid, 
hath  prayed  for  the  benefit  of  the  late  insolvent  act  of  the 
governor,  council  and  general  assembly  of  the  said  prov- 
ince, passed  at  Perth-Amboy  in  the  eighth  year  of  his  pres- 
ent Majesty's  reign,  entitled,  An  act  for  the  relief  of  in- 
solvent debtors,  and  hath  in  open  court  taken  the  oath  pre- 
scribed by  the  said  act  before  the  Hon.  Frederick  Smyth, 
Esq;  chief  justice,  and  John  Berrien,  Esq;  third  justice  of 
the  said  province.  Notice  is  therefore  hereby  given  to  all 
the  creditors  of  the  said  Thomas  Helms,  to  appear  before 
the  justice  aforesaid,  at  the  city  of  Burlington,  on  Thurs- 
day, the  eleventh  day  of  May  next,  at  ten  of  the  clock  in 
the  forenoon  of  the  same  day,  and  shew  cause,  if  any  they 
have,  why  the  said  Thomas  Helms  should  not  be  dis- 
charged, agreeable  to  the  directions  of  the  said  act. — The 
Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.  1377,  April  27,  1769. 

THE  trustees  of  the  college  of  New-Jersey,  give  notice, 
That  at  the  earnest  sollicitation  of  many  particular  persons 
and  societies  friendly  to  the  institution,  they  have  entirely 
repealed  the  law  which  was  to  have  taken  place  in  Septem- 
br  next,  absolutely  requiring  four  years  residence;  and 
resolved  to  admit  upon  the  same  footing  as  before.  They 
think  it  however  necessary  to  notify,  that  every  scholar 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  427 

who  pretends  to  enter  any  of  the  superior  classes,  must 
come  fully  prepared,  and  expect  a  strict  and  impartial  ex- 
amination. And  that  no  school  master,  or  others  con- 
cerned in  the  scholars,  may  have  reason  to  complain  of 
advantages  being  taken  against  them,  it  is  thought  proper 
now  to  publish  the  original  law  of  admission,  and  to  give 
full  information  how  the  trial  is  to  proceed.  The  law  for . 
admission  into  the  freshmen  class,  enacted  in  the  year 
1748,  and  which  has  still  been  the  rule  for  the  examina- 
tion, is  in  the  following  words.  "None  may  expect  to  be 
admitted  but  such  as  being  examined  by  the  president  and 
tutors,  shall  be  found  able  to  render  Virgil  and  Tully's 
orations  into  English;  and  to  turn  English  into  true  and 
grammatical  latin;  and  be  so  well  acquainted  with  the 
greek,  as  to  render  any  part  of  the  four  Evangelists  in  that 
language,  into  latin  or  English;  and  to  give  the  gram- 
matical construction  of  the  words."  By  another  law,  en- 
acted in  the  year  1760,  it  is  ordered,  "That  all  who  are 
admitted  into  the  freshman  class  shall  be  acquainted  with 
vulgar  arithmetic,  which  shall  be  considered  as  a  neces- 
sary term  of  their  admission." 

These  laws  will  be  strictly  observed,  and  it  is  expected 
that  the  scholars  should  not  only  explain  the  authors 
therein  specified,  but  be  well  acquainted  with  the  grounds 
of  the  languages,  and  such  parts  of  education,  as  by  their 
nature  must  be  supposed  to  go  before  the  above  classical 
performances,  viz.  Reading  english  with  propriety,  spell- 
ing the  English  language,  and  writing  it,  without  gram- 
matical errors. 

As  to  the  superior  classes;  whoever  desires  to  enter  the 
Sophomore,  must  either  come  and  sit  down  with  the  fresh- 
men of  the  preceding  year,  before  commencement,  and  be 
judged  at  the  same  time;  or  if  he  comes  later  than  their 
public  examination,  three  must  be  ballotted  from  the  class 


428  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

which  he  desires  to  enter,  and  by  a  fair  comparison  with 
them,  he  will  be  admitted  or  degraded.  The  same  rule 
will  be  observed,  as  to  those  desiring  admission  into  the 
junior  class. 

It  is  expected  and  desired  that  masters  of  large  schools 
who  send  a  number  of  students  to  college,  should  come 
with  them  themselves;  and  be  present  and  assist  at  their 
examination.  By  this  means  they  will  have  the  oppor- 
tunity of  seeing  justice  done  to  them,  and  all  suspicion  of 
unfairness  and  partiality  will  be  effectually  prevented. 

Newark,  April  14,  1769. 
>,          To  be  sold  at  private  sale,  and  en- 
tered on  immediately,  the  farm  of  Cap- 
FARM  *am  James  Gray,  lying  on  the  banks  of 

the  river  Passaick,  about  one  mile  from 
AND  the  church  at  Newark,  which  from  its 

situation  has  perhaps  more  incitements 
to  induce  a  gentleman  who  wants  a 
country  seat,  to  pay  his  attention  to  it,  and  will  more  prob- 
ably please  any  elegant  taste,  than  any  in  the  country,  as 
it  is  capable  of  almost  every  improvement.  There  are  on 
the  farm  two  good  dwelling-houses,  barn,  stable,  and 
coach-house.  It  contains  20  acres  of  excellent  land,  which 
if  well  manag'd  and  improv'd,  will  afford  bread  corn  for 
a  small  family,  besides  grass  and  hay  for  three  horses,  and 
four  or  five  cows,  a  good  orchard  and  large  garden.  It 
commands  a  most  extensive  view  of  the  river,  and  over- 
looks Capt.  Kennedy's  farm,  garden,  and  deer  park,  at 
Petersborough,  to  which  it  is  opposite.  The  river  abounds 
with  fish  and  wild  fowl  in  their  season,  which  may  be 
taken  within  a  few  rods  distance  from  the  houses.  There 
is  about  one  mile  from  the  said  farm,  ten  acres  of  good 
wood  land,  that  will  be  sold  with  said  farm  and  houses, 
or  seperate,  as  may  best  suit  the  purchasers;  if  it  should 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  42 9 

be  inconvenient  for  any  person  to  purchase  the  whole  of 
said  farm,  it  will  be  divided  and  sold  seperate.  For  fur- 
ther particulars  apply  to  Isaac  Ogden,  Esq;  at  Newark, 
who  has  power  to  sell  the  same. 

New-York,  May  i.  Last  Thursday  Capt.  ARCHIBALD 
KENNEDY,  Esq;  was  married  to  Miss  NANCY  WATTS, 
Daughter  of  the  Hon.  JOHN  WATTS,  Esq;  of  this  City,  a 
young  Lady  of  great  Merit,  with  a  handsome  Fortune.1 

THERE  is  now  in  Westchester  Goal,  a  Negro  Man,  who 
says  his  Name  is  Jim ;  that  he  came  from  New-Jersey,  his 
Master's  Name  Erwin,  and  that  he  formerly  belonged  to 
Lawyer  Ogden :  He  is  tall,  and  very  black.  His  Owner 
is  desired  to  send  for  him,  and  pay  Charges. 

ISAAC  OAKLEY,  Goaler. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
914,  May  i,  1769. 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given,  to  all  the  Creditors  of  Joshua 
Pettet,  an  Insolvent  Debtor,  of  the  County  of  Essex,  in 
East  New- Jersey;  to  appear  at  the  House  of  Jonathan  Os- 
born,  at  the  Scotch  Plains,  on  the  ist  Day  of  June  next, 
in  order  to  make  a  Settlement  and  receive  their  Dividend, 
according  as  the  Law  directs. 

William  Line  )     .     . 

Jonathan   Osborn,  f    Assi^ees- 

April  28,  1769. 

—The  New  York  Gazette  or  Weekly  Post  Boy,  No. 
1374,  May  i,  1769. 

New- York,  May  4.  We  hear  from  Newark,  that  Eze- 
kiel  Ball,  an  ingenious  Mechanic,  has  invented  a  new  Ma- 

i  For  a  sketch  of  Capt.  Archibald  Kennedy,  of  the  Royal  Navy,  see 
N.  J.  Archives,  IX.,  460. 


43°  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS. 

chine  for  levelling  the  Roads  with  great  Expedition,  it  is 
made  in  the  Form  of  a  Triangle,  with  a  small  Expence, 
and  is  drawn  by  Horses ;  Cutting  off  the  Ridges  and  filling 
up  the  Ruts  to  Admiration,  and  deserves  to  be  highly  rec- 
ommended to  the  Public;  if  any  Gentleman  is  desirous  of 
knowing  in  what  Manner  it  is  made,  the  Model  may  be 
now  seen  at  his  House. 

To  be  sold,  on  Wednesday  the  loth  of  May  inst.  at  the 
House  of  Robert  Campbell,  at  Freehold,  in  the  County  of 
Monmouth,  the  following  Lots  and  Parcels  of  Land  in 
said  Township,  viz.  The  noted  Tavern,  known  by  the 
Name  of  Campbell's  Tavern,  perhaps  one  of  the  best 
stands  in  the  County,  a  good  Dwelling  House  with  five 
Rooms  and  four  Fire  Places,  a  good  Kitchen  and  Garden 
pailed  in,  as  also  a  good  bearing  Orchard  of  120  Apple 
Trees ;  besides  Peach  and  Cherry  Trees,  of  the  best  Sort, 
with  about  100  Acres  of  Land.  Also  another  Tract  of 
Land  adjoining  on  the  South  Side  of  the  Road,  where  said 
Tavern  stands,  with  about  100  Acres  of  Land,  30  of  which 
are  good  Meadow,  chiefly  of  the  best  Sort;  there  is  also  a 
good  Dwelling  House,  Barn,  and  a  young  bearing  Or- 
chard of  1 50  Trees ;  also  sundry  Lots  of  Land  and  Mead- 
ow lying  adjacent,  will  be  sold  at  the  same  Time.  The 
Vendue  to  continue  two  Days,  if  all  is  not  sold  the  first. 
Also  to  be  sold  at  private  Sale,  a  Plantation  belonging  to 
the  Subscriber,  at  Fresh-Pounds,  in  the  Corporation  of 
New-Brunswick,  containing  about  100  Acres  of  good 
Wheat  Land,  lying  on  the  Stage  Road  that  leads  from 
Philadelphia  to  Amboy,  90  of  which  are  cleared,  and  on 
which  there  is  a  great  Quantity  of  Fruit  Trees,  such  as 
Mulberries,  Apples,  Peaches  and  Cherries,  being  situated 
within  three  Miles  of  two  Forges  and  four  of  a  Landing. 
An  indisputable  Title  will  be  given.  Good  Bonds,  on  In- 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  43 1 

terest  will  be  taken,  if  it  does  not  suit  the  Purchaser  to  pay 
Cash.     The  Vendue  to  begin  at  Ten  of  the  Clock. 

ROBERT  CAMPBELL. 

To  be  sold  at  public  Vendue,  on  Monday  the  2pth  of  May 
next,  (or  at  private  Sale  any  Time  before)  at  Perth- 
Amboy 


UNDER 

SAIL. 


A  BOAT  called  the  Betsy,  lately  be- 
longing to   John   Watson;     the   said 


FIGURE 

OF 

Boat  is  in  exceeding-  good  Order,  with 
BOAT      J. 

a  new  Quarter  Deck,  and  very  commo- 
dious for  Passengers  or  any  other 
Business.  She  will  carry  about  Six 


Cords  of  Wood. 

JEREMIAH  STANTON, 
WILLIAM  WRIGHT. 
April  28th,  1769. 

To  be  sold  at  Public  Vendue, 

By  Order  of  Joseph  Reade,  on  Thursday  25th  of  May, 
Inst.  at  South-River  Bridge,  in  the  County  of 

Middlesex : 

P  >  THE  Plantation  and  Premises  lying 

on  the  West  Side  of  the  said  River, 
OF  FARM  and  on  the  main  Road  f rom  Burling- 
ton, and  Amboy,  lately  belonging  to 
the  Estate  of  Samuel  Neilson,  de- 
ceased :  Containing  by  Estimation, 
One  Hundred  and  Fifteen  Acres, 
Whereon  is  a  good  Dwelling  House,  some  Out-Houses, 
some  clear  Land,  and  some  good  Wood  Land,  where  a 
Tavern  has  been  kept  for  many  Years  past;  there  is  also 
on  it  a  good  Landing  Place  for  Boats  :  Also  there  will  be 
sold  another  Lot  of  Land,  likewise  lately  belonging  to  the 


WITH 


TWO 


432  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

Estate  of  the  said  Samuel  Neilson,  deceased,  about  a  Mile 
from  the  above  Premises  lying  on  Duck-Creek,  on  the 
East  Side  of  the  said  River,  containing  by  Estimation, 
One  Hundred  and  Twenty  Acres,  whereof  great  Part  is 
good  Meadow,  and  good  Wood  Land,  and  whereon  also 
is  a  very  good  and  convenient  Landing  Place.  The  Terms 
and  Conditions  of  Sale  will  be  made  known  at  the  Day  and 
Place  of  Sale. — The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Adver- 
tiser, No.  1374,  May  4,  1769. 

PHILADELPHIA,  May  4. 

Captain  Thompson,  from  Dublin,  on  the  23d  ult.  about 
50  Leagues  from  our  Capes,  spoke  the  Pennsylvania 
Packet,  Captain  Falconer,  bound  to  Ix>ndon  from  this 
Port 

NOTICE  is  hereby  given  to  whom  it  may  concern,  that 
the  owners  of  a  piece  or  parcel  of  wild  marsh,  bounding 
on  Delaware  river,  in  the  county  of  Salem,  and  province 
of  New-Jersey,  lying  and  being  between  the  lands  of  John 
Mecum  and  Allen  Congleton,  do  intend  to  petition  the 
house  of  General  Assembly  of  the  said  province,  for  leave 
to  bring  in  a  bill  at  the  next  sessions  of  General  Assembly, 
for  the  banking,  laying  of  sluices,  and  other  things  need- 
ful to  be  done,  towards  draining  the  aforesaid  piece  of 
wild  marsh. 

BY  virtue  of  several  writs  to  me  directed,  on  the  I9th 
day  of  May  next,  at  the  late  dwelling-house  of  George 
May,  in  the  township  of  Great  Egg-Harbour,  will  be  ex- 
posed to  sale,  by  public  vendue,  between  the  hours  of  12 
and  5  in  the  afternoon  of  said  day,  the  following  described 
tracts  and  lots  of  land,  meadow  and  cedar  swamp,  viz. 
No.  I,  contains  127  acres,  on  which  is  a  good  two  story 
frame  dwelling-house  and  barn,  with  about  20  acres  of 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  433 

cleared  land,  a  grist-mill  and  saw-mill,  in  good  repair,  on 
a  large  stream  of  water,  situate  on  the  northerly  side  of 
Great  Egg-Harbour  river,  near  the  head  of  the  tide; 
within  a  quarter  of  a  mile  from  said  mills  is  a  very  con- 
venient landing,  where  sea  vessels  can  go  and  come  full 
freighted.  No.  2,  is  100  acres  of  timber  land,  and  includes 
the  abovementioned  landing.  No.  3,  is  101  acres  of  cedar 
swamp,  about  a  mile  from  the  above  mills,  lying  on  Bad- 
cock's  creek,  which  is  full  of  timber.  No.  4,  is  50  acres  of 
marsh,  on  the  opposite  side  of  the  river  to  the  first  lot, 
which  is  now  banked,  and  makes  good  meadow.  No.  5, 
is  50  acres  of  land  and  marsh,  on  the  south  west  side  of 
the  river,  at  a  place  called  the  Upper  Pine  Hammock. 
No.  6,  is  50  acres  of  cedar  swamp,  on  Gravelly  Run,  about 
3  miles  from  the  said  mills.  No.  7,  is  46  acres  of  land,  and 
cedar  swamp,  lying  on  the  said  river,  including  a  landing, 
called  Colt's  Landing.  Also  125  acres  of  cedar  swamp, 
in  two  tracts,  a  few  miles  from  said  mills.  Throughout 
the  above  tracts  of  land,  in  many  places,  is  found  large 
quantities  of  iron  ore,  and  the  stream  on  which  the  mills 
are  built,  being  sufficient,  it  is  thought  a  valuable  iron 
work  might  be  erected  there,  and  its  situation  would  ren- 
der the  exportation  of  it  very  convenient.  Any  person 
inclining  to  purchase,  may  view  the  premises,  by  applying 
to  Charles  Steelman,  or  Samuel  Snell,  near  the  same. 
Credit  will  be  given  for  two  thirds  of  the  purchase  money, 
with  paying  interest.  The  whole  late  the  real  estate  of 
said  George  May;  seized  in  execution,  and  to  be  sold  by 

SAMUEL  BLACKWOOD,  Sheriff. 

N.  B.     At  the  same  time  will  be  sold,  a  quantity  of 
West-Jersey  rights. 

Gloucester,  April  27,  1769. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Gazette,  No.  2106,  May  4,  1769. 
A  Correspondent  writes  us,  that  a  Body  of  upwards  of 


434  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

500  stout  active  industrious  Men,  completely  armed  and 
accoutred,  are  arrived  at  or  near  the  Minisinks,  from  New- 
England,  (with  Carts,  Oxen,  Horses,  and  various  Instru- 
ments of  Mechanism  and  Husbandry)  on  their  Way  to 
possess  and  settle  the  Lands  they  claim  on  the  Susque- 
hannah,  from  whence  a  small  Party  were  lately  forced  by 
a  superior  Number  of  Proprietary  Agents  and  Partisans 
of  this  Province.  They  are  continually  joined  by  People 
from  different  Parts  of  New- Jersey,  in  which  Province 
they  met  with  the  greatest  Hospitality.  They  are  in  high 
Spirits,  on  their  near  Approach  to  what  they  call  the 
American  Canaan,  or  Land  of  Promise. — The  Pennsylva- 
nia Chronicle,  No.  122,  May  8-15,  1769. 

New-York,  May  8.  A  Sloop  from  Coracoa,1  for  this 
Port,  Anthony  Pereau,  Master,  was  drove  ashore  last 
Tuesday  Night  in  a  hard  Gale  of  Wind  at  South-East,  at 
Shrewsbury  Inlet,  on  the  Coast  of  New- Jersey;  the  Vessel 
is  entirely  lost,  and  three  of  the  People,  two  white  Men, 
and  a  Negro,  perished  with  the  Cold :  The  Cargo,  Mo- 
hagony,  and  chipped  Logwood,  will  be  saved. 

FIVE  DOLLARS  Reward. 

RuN-away  from  the  subscriber,  in  Elizabeth-Town, 
East  New- Jersey,  on  Sunday  evening  last,  a  servant  lad 
named  Cornelius  Hurry,  born  in  Old  England,  about  19 
years  of  age,  five  feet  6  inches  high,  fair  complexion,  light 
coloured  hair :  Had  on  when  he  went  away,  a  blue  sail- 
or's jacket,  much  worn,  and  faded;  a  blue  broad  cloth 
under  jacket;  a  pair  of  buckskin  breeches,  blue  stockings, 
half  boots  much  worn.  He  has  lived  with  the  subscriber 
as  an  hostler,  can  trim  a  horse  very  well.  Whoever  se- 
cures the  above  servant,  and  confines  him  in  any  goal  in 
this  or  the  neighbouring  provinces,  or  returns  him  to  his 

i  Curacoa. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  435 

master,  shall  receive  the  above  reward,  and  all  reasonable 
charges,  paid  by  me.  BROUGHTON  REYNOLDS. 

— The  New  York  Gazette  and  Weekly  Mercury,  No. 
915,  May  8,  1769. 

LOST, 

FROM  the  South  Side  of  Staten-Island,  the  twenty-sixth 
Day  of  April,  a  CANOE,  of  about  20  Feet  long,  three  Feet 
wide,  with  a  small  Bar  of  Iron  under  the  Seat.  Whoever 
takes  up  or  secures  said  Canoe,  so  that  the  Owner  may 
have  her  again,  shall  have  Two  Dollars  Reward,  paid  by 
me.  BENJAMIN  SPINING 

Elizabeth-Town,  April  9,  1769. 

FOUR  POUNDS  REWARD, 

RuN-away  from  the  Subscriber,  living  in  Shrewsberry, 
in  the  County  of  Monmouth  and  Province  of  East  New- 
Jersey,  the  3Oth  of  April,  a  Man  about  five  Feet  five  or  six 
Inches  high,  round  Face,  a  very  strait  limb'd  Fellow, 
about  thirty  Years  of  Age,  named  Thomas  Howel.  Mer- 
ica  Bourn,  a  Woman,  has  left  this  Place  in  order  to  marry 
him,  which  will  be  his  third  Wife,  if  so  she  may  be  called, 
the  first  being  living;  and  was  branded  in  the  Hand  for 
marrying  the  second,  whether  the  Brand  is  yet  to  be  seen 
I  cannot  say;  Also  at  the  same  Time  a  Servant  Man, 
named  Joseph  Compton,  about  five  Feet  high,  about  26 
Years  of  Age,  run-away  from  the  Subscriber,  they  are 
supposed  to  be  together;  the  Servant  has  a  large  Scar  on 
one  of  his  Insteps,  occasioned  by  the  cut  of  an  Ax,  and  is 
already  advertised  also,  at  Four  Pounds  Reward.  Who- 
ever takes  up  and  secures  either  the  Prisoner  or  Servant, 
shall  be  paid  the  above  Reward,  if  both,  Eight  Pounds  for 
the  two,  by  me  STEPHEN  TALLMAN,  jun. 

— The  New  York  Journal  or  General  Advertiser,  No. 
1375,  May  n,  1769. 


436  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL    DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

G.  BARTRAM  and  P.  SHIRAS, 
Have  brought  up  to  their  store,  at  Mountholly, 
A  LARGE  and  general  assortment  of  European,  East  and 
West-India  GOODS,   which   was   purchased  on   the  best 
terms :   therefore  are  determined  to  supply  the  town  and 
country  lower  than  has  been  done  there  for  many  years 
past,  and  purposes  to  sell  for  ready  money,  or  country 
produce,  only. 

N.  B.  The  public  will  be  made  acquainted  with  the 
particulars  of  the  Goods  by  another  Advertisement,  in  a 
few  days  time. 

To  BE  SOLD, 

A  TRACT  of  LAND  in  West  New- Jersey,  situate  in  the 
township  of  Nottingham,  on  the  south  side  of  Sunpink 
Creek,  about  4  miles  from  Trenton,  and  5  from  the  pub- 
lic landing,  below  the  Falls,  known  by  the  name  of  the 
Bear  Swamp,  joining  lands  of  Rebeccah  Wright,  and  oth- 
ers, containing  about  300  acres,  200  of  which  may  be  made 
good  meadow,  with  a  stream  of  water  running  through 
the  same,  a  small  part  of  the  upland  cleared,  the  rest  well 
timbered.  Also  a  house  and  lot  on  the  west  side  of  Fifth- 
street,  two  doors  above  Arch-street,  containing  in  width 
19  feet  and  an  half,  and  in  depth  50  feet,  with  a  two  story 
kitchen,  and  good  cellar  under  the  whole.  For  further 
particulars,  enquire  of  Andrew  Edge,  in  Third-street,  the 
corner  of  Church-alley. 

N.  B.  Goods,  that  are  saleable,  will  answer  as  well  as 
cash,  for  one  half  of  the  purchase  money,  the  remainder 
will  be  made  easy  to  the  purchaser,  with  an  indisputable 
title. 

WEST  JERSEY  RIGHTS, 
To  be  sold  by  JOHN  and  LAMBERT  CAD w ALDER,  in 


1769]  NEWSPAPER   EXTRACTS.  437 

Front-street,  a  little  above  Walnut-street. — The  Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette,  No.  2107,  May  n,  1769. 

PRINCETON,  (New-Jersey)  May  6. 
On  Sunday  evening,  the  3Oth  of  April,  as  the  Revd. 
Mr.  John  Blair,  Mr.  Benjamin  Skillman,  his  wife  and 
daughter,  who  had  a  young  child  in  her  arms,  were  re- 
turning from  Kingston,  where  Mr.  Blair  preached  that 
day,  had  occasion  to  cross  Millston  in  a  Battoe  (as  it  was 
swolen  with  the  rain)  were  accidentally  overset  in  the 
middle  of  the  current,  which  run  very  rapidly;  Mr.  Blair 
'tis  said  was  so  long  under  water,  that  a  few  moments 
more  would  have  landed  him  in  eternity;  after  they 
emerged,  they  clung  to  the  battoe,  until  they  caught  hold 
of  some  limbs,  by  the  help  of  which  they  all  got  on  shore, 
except  Mrs.  Skillman,  who  missing  that  opportunity,  was 
unfortunately  drowned. 

We  are  informed,  that  at  a  meeting  of  the  Trustees  of 
the  College  of  New-Jersey,  lately  held  at  Nassau-Hall, 
the  Revd.  Mr.  Blair,  Professor  ol:  Divinity  in  said  Col- 
lege, requested  liberty  to  resign  his  said  office,  as  he  con- 
sidered the  present  revenue  of  that  college  insufficient  for 
the  support  of  a  professorship;  and  that  the  instruction 
of  pupils  in  that  branch  might  at  present  devolve  upon  the 
President  of  the  College.  The  Trustees  gave  him  the 
thanks  of  the  board  for  his  services  to  that  institution,  and 
considering  the  application  as  an  act  of  generosity  and 
disinterestedness  in  him,  added  the  highest  testimonials  of 
their  approbation  of  his  character  and  conduct. 

Trenton,  in  West  New  Jersey,  May  4,  1769. 

To   WHOM   IT   MAY   CONCERN. 

WHEREAS  by  an  act  of  the  General  Assembly  of  the 
province  of  Pennsylvania,  passed  in  the  year  1765,  I  was 
granted  the  enlargement  of  my  person  for  ever,  against 


438  NEW    JERSEY    COLONIAL   DOCUMENTS.  [1769 

all  debts  contracted  by  me,  before  my  surrender  made  on 
the  1 4th  day  of  February,  1764.  And  whereas  I  am  again 
sued  and  in  danger  of  being  distressed  in  this  province, 
for  the  ballances  that  remain  due  to  some  of  my  creditors, 
and  hereby  shall  be  prevented  from  endeavouring  to  dis- 
charge the  just  ballances  that  may  remain  against  me,  after 
a  distribution  of  my  effects  surrendered  in  the  year  1764, 
is  made,  agreeable  to  the  above  recited  act  of  assembly. 
These  therefore  are  to  notify  all  those  whom  it  may  con- 
cern, that  at  the  next  meeting  of  the  General  Assembly  of 
the  province  of  New  Jersey,  I  do  intend  to  petition  that 
Honourable  House  and  pray  them  to  grant  me  such  relief 
as  they  in  their  wisdom  shall  think  meet. 

ROBERT  LETTIS  HOOPER,  Jun. 

To  the  CREDITORS  of  JOHN  BUDD, 

GENTLEMEN, 

I  Am  extremely  sorry  to  hear  that  you  neither  have,  or 
are  likely  to  receive  any  part  of  the  money  due  from  me 
to  you  if  things  remain  in  their  present  situation,  and  as 
some  of  bonds  are  now  in  the  hands  of  the  executors,  &c. 
of  my  deceased  creditors,  a  letter  of  licence  in  the  common 
form  is  impracticable.  I  have  therefore  no  way  left  to  do 
you  justice,  but  by  petitioning  the  legislative  body  of  the 
province  of  New- Jersey,  for  an  act  to  grant  me  licence  to 
return  and  reside  in  the  said  province,  five  years  free  from 
arrest,  to  collect  in  the  money  due  to  me  and  pay  my 
debts :  This  method  has  been  proposed  to  me  by  some  of 
my  principal  creditors,  and  I  make  no  doubt  but  it  will  be 
acceptable  to  you  all.  I  therefore  design  to  do  it  at  the 
next  sitting  of  the  assembly  of  the  said  province.  I  am, 
Gentlemen,  with  the  greatest  respect  your  very  humble 
Servant  J.  BUDD. 

— The  Pennsylvania  Journal,  No.    1379,   May    n, 
1769. 


1769]  NEWSPAPER    EXTRACTS.  439 

WHEREAS  the  subscriber,  living  in  the  city  of  Burling- 
ton, in  the  province  of  New- Jersey,  executed  a  note  to  one 
Alexander  Lindsey,  for  the  sum  of  Nine  Pounds  Five 
Shillings,  for  a  servant  girl,  which  the  said  Lindsey  fraud- 
ulently sold  to  him,  alledging  that  he  had  just  brought  her 
from  ship  board,  which  is  entirely  false;  these  are  there- 
fore to  forewarn  all  persons  from  taking  an  assignment  of 
said  note,  as  I  am  determined  not  to  pay  it,  unless  com- 
pelled thereto  by  law.  Witness  my  hand  the  2/th  of  April, 
1769.  George  Dunham. 

N.  B.  The  said  girl  has  been  discharged. — The  Penn- 
sylvania Chronicle,  No.  123,  May  15-22,  1769. 

To  be  sold  at  private  sale,  any  time  before  the  first  day 
of  July  next,  the  plantation  on  which  Nathaniel  Salmon 
now  lives,  in  Springfield,  in  the  borough  of  Elizabeth,  in 
East  New-Jersey,  within  half  a  mile  of  the  presbyterian 
church  in  said  place;  it  contains  about  50  acres,  near  half 
of  it  good  mowing;  it  has  on  it  a  good  double  house  and 
barn,  stable,  smoak  house,  chair  house,  cyder  mill,  with 
two  good  presses,  likewise  other  necessary  out  houses;  a 
good  garden,  and  bearing  orchard  of  1 50  apple  trees,  and 
near  2000  peach  trees  of  the  best  fruit,  all  in  their  greatest 
perfection.  It  is  bounded  on  the  south  side  by  the  east 
branch  of  Raway  river;  is  very  pleasantly  and  conve- 
niently situated  for  a  gentleman's  country  seat,  or  for  a 
store,  tavern,  or  tradesman.  Any